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183: The Road to Excellence: Featured Interview with David Mattson

President and CEO of the Sandler Organization

Bill Ringle and Dave Mattson discuss some of the crucial blind spots to building a successful business, as well as the 6 phases of the Excellence Process: Planning, Positions, People, Processes, Performetrics, Passion.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • Growth is continuous, so training to succeed should also be continuous
  • You have to become comfortable talking about money to reach higher levels of success as a small business owner
  • Surprising how many companies fail to take advantage of creating an onboarding playbook for success and the many forms it can take
  • How a sales manager can successfully link an employee’s personal and corporate goals
  • The 6 P’s in the Excellence Process

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:14 How his grandfather inspired Dave to have a strong work ethic.

3:55 “I came from a family of non-sales people.”

5:26 The importance of putting your own personality into sales.

5:39 How Dave started working with David Sandler.

7:09 Characteristics of entrepreneurs who need outside help

8:04 Why it’s essential for a team of sales people to use the same sales language.

9:54 How to recognize when you have a blind spot and what to do about it.

10:30 “Being an entrepreneur, it’s a lonely business.”

11:10 “People will work harder for themselves than they will for you.”

12:06 “In order to link the corporate goal to the personal goal, you should sit down and have a conversation that would look something like this.”

14:09 “Do you know the top 2 or 3 goals for the people who work for you? If not, you have a blind spot.”

15:21 “If you’re working on the business it’s really tough to work on the business.”

15:45 How having best practices allows your employees to mimic success.

17:06 “If someone’s stepping into that role, i want them to produce at the same level as the person who’s leaving that role.”

17:17 The 6 “P’s” in the excellence process.

18:19 “Where I want to be then affects where the company will be.”

22:12 How to set up your company’s practices so that if the leader or a pivotal employee leaves, the company isn’t paralyzed.

24:31 The Lightning Round

Expert Bio

David Mattson is the CEO and President of Sandler Training, an international training and consulting organization headquartered in North America. Since 1986, he has been a trainer and business consultant for management, sales, interpersonal communication, corporate team building and strategic planning throughout the United States and Europe. A Wall Street Journal bestselling author, his new book is The Road To Excellence: 6 Leadership Strategies To Build a Bulletproof Business.

For more information, visit David Mattson’s website.

Contact Info for David Mattson

Web address: https://www.sandler.com/about/our-story/dave-mattson

Travels from: Owning Mills, MD (Baltimore area)

Phone: 410-653-1993

Contact:

LinkedIn Twitter

Resources Mentioned by David Mattson:

Redeem Your Sandler Class Crash Offer: 

Click here to redeem your complimentary sales class with the Sandler Corporation!

Just message a nearby Sandler Training Center and say “I listened to Dave and Bill on the My Quest for the Best podcast, and I want to crash a class!”

Thanks so much for this generous offer, Dave!

  

Chris Clearfield

177: Meltdown: Interview with Chris Clearfield

Founder of System Logic, Co-Author of Meltdown

Bill Ringle and Chris Clearfield discuss the remarkable simplicity that can avert catastrophic business disasters, applicable of organizations of all sizes.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • Complexity is unavoidable, so here is how to think about it in order to manage it successfully.
  • Why it is important to consider how many things have to go RIGHT for your project to succeed.
  • The importance of developing a test and feedback cadence in your work.
  • The myth of the open door policy.
  • How a Toronto hospital cut down unnecessary (and costly) x-rays by changing their protocol

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:41 Chris tells about the time when a physics professor took the time to explain a difficult subject to him, and eventually took him under his wing, and the impact that had on his young mind.

3:56 “When you’re doing science, you don’t always have the answer, and sometimes you get an answer that you don’t expect…the world is not a straightforward and linear place.”

4:46 Chris describes his role working for James Street, and using computers to recognize how much things were worth.

6:58 “Once I understood the trading and I understood the infrastructure and the regulatory stuff and the way everything came together, I switched to a role where I was looking at these bigger questions of risk.”

9:00 How reading about aviation infrastructure, or lack thereof, in Asia allowed Chris to see the complexity inherent in the system.

9:24 “Why do some organizations do a great job of making decisions in really complex environments and managing risk and others do not?”

9:58 “Aviation has figured out how to manage some of these risks prospectively.”

11:00 The genesis of starting his own firm.

11:57 Chris recounts his interest in the BP oil spill. “I was really interested in understanding what happened, and as I dug in more and more…I became fascinated with how the accident happened.”

12:37 “The greatest environmentalist in the last 50 years, might’ve been someone at BP who said, ‘No, this isn’t the right way to do this.’”

13:53 The reason to buy down risk. “There are things happening in the world that [people] don’t quite understand that will affect their business.”

15:18 The importance of preparing for the “knock-on” consequences.

15:58 “It’s not about figuring out what hatch to close, it’s about developing a different perspective and saying: ‘Oh, these things might interact in a way that causes a big problem.’”

16:24 “We wear a seatbelt not because we know the exact kind of accident we’re going to get into, we wear a seatbelt because we want to protect ourselves regardless of the accident.”

17:34 On the post-disaster case study. “I think what that training did was give them the confidence they needed so that they were able to, the next time these things came up, not only deal with it in real time but see the precursors.”

19:12 “In this day and age, there is so much more interconnectedness and complexity.”

20:02 How the Meltdown Quiz can you help you think better about your existing systems. “How many things in this project have to go right for this project to succeed?”

22:28 “We need to add structure to our thinking…we do a lot of work with leaders to help them develop a process to add that structure to their thinking.”

23:05 How to avoid falling into the trap of making the situation more complex than it needs to be.”

26:10 What it means to, as Cal Newport named it, “do deep work.”

27:16 How Chris tracks his deep work hours.

27:53 “I realized that my morning routine with my five-year-old son looked a lot like a crisis.”

30:44 Why you should start your meetings a little bit differently.”

33:18 How doctors in Toronto figured out that asking patients a handful of questions could quickly determine whether or not the patient needed an x-ray.

35:00 “An open door policy is not enough.”

37:25 Chris’s three big takeaways.

Expert Bio

Before starting System Logic, Chris worked as a derivatives trader at a prestigious proprietary trading firm focused on understanding and hedging risk. After years as a trader in New York, Tokyo, and Hong Kong, his role matured from trading to analyzing the financial and regulatory risks inherent in the business of technologically complex high-speed trading to devising policies that mitigate those risks.

He co-authoredMeltdown: Why Our Systems Fail and What We Can Do About It with András Tilcsik, a Toronto business-school professor, to tell us how and why.

He graduated from Harvard College, where he studied physics and biology and is a licensed commercial pilot. He now lives and works in Seattle, WA with his family.

For more information, visit the Rethink Risk website.

Contact Info for Chris Clearfield

Web address: https://www.rethinkrisk.net/

Travels from: Seattle, WA

Phone: 646-543-4250

Contact:

LinkedIn 

Resources Mentioned by Chris Clearfield:

Meltdown Deep Work

Take the Meltdown Quiz! 

Featured Interview with Cal Newport 

 

173: How to Hire A Players: Featured Interview with Eric Herrenkohl

President of Herrenkohl Consulting

Eric Herrenkohl talks with Bill Ringle about how to hire A-Players for Small Business Leaders.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • The fatal flaw of treating hiring as a transactional process
  • Understanding that outstanding performers often need to be managed and supported differently than others
  • Recruiting is a critical leadership skill
  • The magic of involvement leading to buy-in
  • The precaution that C-players may be able to sell themselves better than A-players
  • The best questions to ask to discover the real responsibilities that a candidate undertook
  • How to coach your team to find the best fit for the role without worrying about offending candidates (you’re actually doing them a service, too!)
  • Even very good businesspeople have blind spots that can limit their effectiveness (in hiring as well as in performing)

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

3:04 Eric discusses what it was like meeting Bob Perkins at YoungLife.

3:19 “Great leaders lead other leaders.”

4:01 “If you want to hire and keep great people then you’re going to have to be prepared to invest in a few and have that team be the core that impacts the many.”

6:08 Why “A Players” can sometimes be difficult.

7:48 “I think there’s a difference between disagreeable [people] and people who are behaving poorly because they’re not getting the attention, and not getting treated the way that they need.”

9:25 Why leaders should always have a Plan B when it comes to dealing with toxic A Players.

12:02 “You’ve got to get your whole team involved in recruiting.”

14:25 What it means to have an A Player scorecard, and what the process means for team buy-in of new recruits.

14:51 How asking questions can create a whole new level of employee engagement.

16:23 “We get better at things that we practice.”

18:03 Tested tips and tricks for putting interviewees at ease before and during an interview.

18:08 “The most important interview question is the follow-up question.”

20:54 “What you’re doing as an interviewer is working to ensure a good mutual fit: good for the company, and good for the person.”

22:45 “There are not that many great leaders out there, so if you invest in your own ability as a leader, if you get better as a leader, then you’ll attract other leaders.”

23:25 “I’m committed to finding and hiring the best people that I can.”

23:57 What inspired Eric to write the book How to Hire A-Players.

26:54 “Over the last 6 months the talent markets have gotten hotter, making it harder to find and hire the best.”

27:35 What Eric does to stay productive and on track. 

Expert Bio

Eric Herrenkohl is the President of Herrenkohl Consulting, a consulting and retained executive search firm that he founded in 2002. He works as an advisor to CEOs on building superior leadership teams.

Eric is the author of the upcoming book Crowbar: Pry away top talent, surround yourself with the right leaders, and create the team your customers demand.

His previous book How to Hire A-Players is an Amazon bestseller published by Wiley that is described as one of the top 10 recruiting books of all time by Recruiter.com.

Business Week, Fox News, NBC News, the Toronto Globe and Mail, the Philadelphia Business Journal, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Inc.com, Careerbuilder.com, MSNBC.com, Monster.com, and the LinkedIn Talent Blog have all featured his work.

Eric holds a master’s degree from Covenant Seminary in St. Louis and an undergraduate degree in economics and history from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He and his wife and four children live in the Philadelphia area.

For more information, visit Eric Herrenkohl’s website.

Contact Info for Eric Herrenkohl

Web address: http://www.herrenkohl.com/

Travels from: Wynnewood, PA

Phone: (610) 742-8196

Connect on Social Media

LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube

Resources Mentioned by Eric Herrenkohl:

Bob Perkins – WRTI

167: How Creativity Remakes the World – Featured Interview with Anthony Brandt

Author, Director Professor of Composition and Theory at Rice University

Anthony Brandt talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about how creativity is an untapped wellspring of ideas to enrich your life and business.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • How making cards and gifts in his family growing up nurtured his belief in everyday creativity, which is why he still carries on this tradition in his family today.
  • How business leaders can harness the dynamic tension between what’s familiar and what’s new to improve products and services.
  • Examples of how to encourage creativity in the workplace, and when to recognize that you’ve gone too far and are making your people uncomfortable.
  • The importance of creativity in your company’s culture, and whether to concentrate on a dedicated team or to imbue creativity throughout the culture.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:08 Anthony describes one of the ways he and David co-author Eagleman initially connected.

1:41 How Anthony’s parents practice of restricting TV, and introducing construction materials, in the home encouraged his early creativity.

3:13 “From the moment I did something like playing the violin, I also wanted to make the music myself.”

4:15 Why hearing their piece rehearsed is such a joy for composers.

4:45 “David’s an amazing scientist. Not only does he do cutting edge research, but he’s also a best selling novelist.”

5:53 Bill tells off the collaborative efforts between Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison

7:39 Why did Beethoven move to Vienna? – “He needed to be embedded in a culture in order to thrive as an individual creator.”

8:17 “There’s this virtuous loop between social engagement and the actions of our own imagination.”

10:06 Anthony describes the process of writing the book with David Eagleman.

10:38 “The only reason animals have memories is in order to better predict the future.”

11:01 [Exploration vs. Exploitation] – “Every animal. even if their in the most bountiful environment, they’ve got all the food they could ever want, will dedicate a certain amount of their life to exploring new environments.”

11:40 [The roots of creativity] – “Being able to think beyond the present moment and detach from reality and imagine alternative futures, that was where, evolutionarily, the seed of creativity was born.”

13:54 “It’s true that some examples of creativity exist in the wild, but they’re very anecdotal and they’re very limited.”

15:31 “[Creativity] is something that is absolutely normal. It is awe-inspiringly ordinary. “

16:55 Anthony’s steps for people who want to reconnect with their creativity. – “Whatever you can find that you can make yourself, do it yourself.”

18:29 “Creativity is too often presented as being all about novelty…human minds like to have one foot in the familiar and one foot in the unexpected.”

22:44 “One of the most dangerous concepts is that of the finish line.”

24:20 “How do you know when you’ve come up with a great idea?”

26:05 What companies can do to foster creativity in the workplace.

28:10 “There’s no doubt that creativity is risky.”

31:00 The importance of play not just for children, but for adults too.

33:13 Why composers are so deadline driven, and why it’s essential to create “intermediate deadlines” for yourself in the midst of a large project.

35:20 What Anthony uses to stay on track and productive.

37:12 “The smartest and the most successful people are the ones who are generating the most options.” 

Expert Bio

Composer Anthony Brandt is a Professor of Composition and Theory at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music and Artistic Director of the award-winning contemporary music ensemble Musiqa. He and neuroscientist David Eagleman have co-authored “The Runaway Species: How Creativity Remakes the World” (“Essential and highly pleasurable reading”-Kirkus, “A refreshing and thought-provoking book”-Booklist ,”Beautifully produced, illustrated and written”–Nature). Dr. Brandt’s musical catalogue includes orchestral, chamber, vocal, theater, dance and television works, installation pieces and two chamber operas. Recordings of his music are available on the Albany and Crystal labels. His honors include a Koussevitzky Commission from the Library of Congress, grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, Meet-the-Composer, and the Houston Arts Alliance, and fellowships to the MacDowell and Djerassi arts colonies.

He has been a visiting composer at the Bremen Musikfest, the Universidad Veracruzana, the Bowdoin International Music Festival, the Baltimore New Chamber Festival, Cleveland State University and SUNY-Buffalo, and composer-in-residence of the International Festival of Music in Morelia, Mexico and Houston’s OrchestraX. Dr. Brandt has co-authored articles for the journals Frontiers and Brain Connectivity and is a contributing author to the upcoming Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology. He is also the author of the innovative free online music appreciation course “Sound Reasoning,” available at OpenStax.org. He is currently a co-investigator in a study of music and stroke recovery at Methodist Hospital’s Center for Performing Arts Medicine. Dr. Brandt has been awarded Rice University’s Phi Beta Kappa and George R. Brown Teaching Prizes.

For more information, visitAnthony Brandt’s Website.

Contact Info for Anthony Brandt

Web address: https://runawayspecies.com/

Travels from: Houston, TX

Phone: (646) 928-5999

Contact:

 Twitter LinkedIn

Resources Mentioned by Anthony Brandt:

162: Scuba Tanks and Fierce Conversations – Featured Interview with Susan Scott

Founder of Fierce, Inc., Author of Fierce Conversations and Fierce Leadership

Susan Scott talks to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about fierce leadership and the benefits of learning how to have truly meaningful conversations.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • What is the real role of managers
  • Why leaders should offer their employees to challenge the way they’re thinking.
  • How meaningful conversation occurs in a culture where candor is valued.
  • How “putting on a scuba tank” can keep your meetings from being a waste of time.
  • Why practice can make you a better communicator

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:39 Scott talks about an early role model – her grandmother – the first to start the Tuxedo rental business.

2:07 [On starting Fierce] – “I had been running groups of CEO’s here in Seattle…and I would meet with each of them once a month for about 2 hours.”

2:45 [Inspired by Hemingway] “I had an epiphany that our companies and our careers and our relationships and our lives can succeed or fail, gradually hen suddenly, one conversation at a time.” 

3:08 “What gets talked about within a company, how it gets talked about, and who is invited to the conversation, determines what’s going to happen.”

4:22 [Paraphrasing Annie Dillard] – “How we spend our days is how we spend our lives.”

4:29 “Most leaders are spending their days in meeting after meeting after meeting, conversation after conversation after conversation.”

5:23 The importance of straight talk and straight listening.

5:38 “People are understandably frightened to disclose what they’re really thinking and feeling, and they don’t necessarily want to go for the biggest and baddest and toughest and most complicated issues.”

5:59 “People end up waterskiing through their conversations rather than putting on a scuba tank and going deeper.”

7:14 “Fierce Leadership is the book that if somebody’s going to read one book, they should read that one.”

7:57 [On making the conversation real] – “You have to decide whether or not you really care about the issues on the table. If you don’t care, then you’re not necessarily going to come out from behind yourself and be real.”

8:22 “I would hope that you are in a culture where candid candor is valued.”

8:31 “No plan will survive its collision with reality.”

9:31 “The person who’s holding the meeting fills that form before everyone comes together for the meeting.”

10:21 “A leader’s job is not to be right, a leader’s job is to get it right for the company.”

10:38 “If I’m the leader, I want to start by changing the way I’m holding my meetings.”

11:31 “There’s an easy and graceful way to put your perspective on the table even if it contradicts the leaders of the organization.”

12:14 “Most people aren’t even aware that they’re shutting people down.”

13:05 “In our training nobody does any role play, nobody pretends to be someone other than who they are.”

14:29 How practice can make you a better communicator.

14:51 “We teach people what accountability really is and how to raise the bar on accountability.”

16:05 How a meeting facilitator can help keep a meeting from derailing.

16:31 “We want the client to have gotten tremendous benefit from the training and actually make progress on an issue that is of great importance to them.”

17:12 People always amaze me at how brave, courageous, and skillful they can be very quickly, given the right tools and understanding of what’s at stake.”

17:59 “What is your role as a manager? It is not to have all of the answers, it is not to create the plan all by yourself.”

18:42 “If I as a manager am always just dictating to them what they should do, and sharing the brilliance of my own thinking with them, there’s not much room for them to shine. Plus, I am not always going to get it right.”

20:13 [On Managers changing mindset] – “Why would I want to go back to that lonely role of coming up with all of these ideas myself, when I’ve got some amazing people who came up with ideas is a short amount of time?”

22:05 “When everybody knows, and you tell them at the beginning ‘Before we conclude I’m going to ask every one of you to give me your best advice,’ when you do that, no one is going to be checking out.”

23:08 “If you haven’t heard from somebody in the meeting you call on them.”

23:38 “You teach people how to behave in these meetings and no one gets to hide out and shrink their subatomic particles and vanish off the radar screen. They’re invited to the meeting because their perspective is important.”

25:24 [Paraphrasing Will Rogers] – “Politicians are good at saying absolutely nothing and saying it all the time. Nobody’s listening and then everybody disagrees,”

26:43 Ask more questions, respond with fewer ‘Yes, but’s,” especially in regards to political discussions.

29:44 “Labelling people or groups of people is so counterproductive.”

30:30 “People are tired of having these 360 anonymous inputs…people want to have conversations.”

30:53 “Companies are shifting their performance management to be this ongoing conversation.”

31:00 The two major updates to Fierce Conversations

33:04 [On feedback] – “The time has come, we all know that we need it.”

33:36 “Let’s get away from the practice of holding people accountable and holding people able and modeling accountability.”

34:09 “Be very clear with people on what are their deliverables.”

34:44 “There’s no way I can hold you to a standard that is higher than the one I’m exhibiting myself.”

34:54 “Accountability is an attitude.”

35:03 “You have to create an environment in which people choose accountability.”

36:08 Feedback Scott has received from readers.

37:23 “You wasn’t people to come up with their own insights.”

38:59 [On fierce conversations] – “It’s one where we lean in, we really listen to one another, we totally disclose what we’re thinking, we share the goal of getting it right.

39:17 Five questions with Susan Scott

Expert Bio

Susan Scott is a best-selling author and leadership development architect who has enabled top executives worldwide to engage in vibrant dialogue with one another, with their employees, and with their customers for more than two decades. As CEO of Fierce Conversation, a company she founded in 2001, Susan sets the company’s strategic vision and creates the culture through her ongoing commitment to ensure employees are engaged, communication is candid, and learning is continuous.

Prior to starting Fierce, Susan spent 12 years running think tanks for CEOs designing and delivering training to peers working with CEOs across the globe. In 2002, ‘Fierce Conversations -Achieving Success at Work and in Life, One Conversation at a Time,’ was published in 4 countries. It was included on The Wall Street Journal and UPI best seller lists, and was one of USA TODAY’S top 40 business books of 2002. Her much anticipated second book – ‘Fierce Leadership: A Bold Alternative to the Worst ‘Best’ Practices of Business Today was published in 2009, and was also listed on The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times best seller lists. In May 2017 Susan re-released “Fierce Conversations” with 40% updated content, incorporating more data and technology that was developed through her experience in the industry over the last 15 years.

For more information, visit Susan Scott’s website.

Contact Info for Susan Scott

Web address: www.fierceinc.com

Travels from: Seattle, WA

Phone: (206) 818-2429

Contact: Sarah Mann

LinkedIn Facebook Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Susan Scott:

 

Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises

Henry David Thoreau’s Walden

Annie Dillard

Will Rogers

159: Action is the Key to Success – Featured Interview with Rhett Power

Entrepreneur, Author, Coach, Columnist at Inc. and Success Magazines

Rhett Power talks with Bill Ringle about the troubles and triumphs of entrepreneurship, and why it just might not be for everyone.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • Is entrepreneurship an innate talent?
  • How Power’s time in the Peace Corps encouraged him to take risks
  • What allowed Wild Creations to go from being out of money to being a $9 million company
  • How reliability and communication can lead to trust with vendors
  • The formula for success that Rhett Power found the hard way

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:40 Power tells about the early influencers of his life.

2:40 [The Peace Corps] – “All of those life lessons prepared me for entrepreneurship.”

2:55 “Is entrepreneurship learned or is it innate?”

3:32 “Well I think certain people have the characteristics, maybe you’re born with it…but I see both sides now.”

3:52 “I think all types can be good entrepreneurs.”

5:04 “Some people are entrepreneurs and they don’t know it.”

5:27 Power recounts the various odd jobs he did prior to joining the Peace Corps. “It took me a while to find, finally, what I wanted to do.”

6:38 “It was the best move I ever made because I learned those two years about myself and about truly being able to do what I wanted to do, and to take chances.”

6:51 “Nobody’s going to hand you success, no one’s gonna do it for you. If you want something you’ve got to go out and work for it.”

7:39 “The work I did after Peace Corps in the developing countries, in the former Soviet Union, helping them understand what a market economy was, and helping them transition, and be profitable, and learn how to manage a new type of company, is what sort of got me where I got comfortable with the idea of going into business for myself.”

8:15 The genesis of Wild Creations.

8:25 “We both wanted to be in business. We felt like it was our time to do something and create something that was ours.”

9:10 Power describes the early days of Wild Creations, including an interaction with a body removal company.

9:43 [On taking over Wild Creations] – “We saw where the product could go, we saw what we could do with it. We thought that we could do something different with the company.”

10:30 [Wild Creations’ initial product.] – “It had all kinds of problems.”

11:11 How a UPS technology grant allowed Wild Creations to get off the ground.

11:32 “Every single vendor gave us 6 months of credit, or there would have been no way to secure those first orders.”

12:10 “Frankly we were struggling, we were probably about a month from having to close the doors.” 

12:57 “We didn’t have it in toy stores. We had it in little gift and novelty stores.”

13:26 How a connection with the president of the Toy Store Association allowed Wild Creations to get their foot in the door. “Come to New York, come to the Toy Fair.”

14:18 [On the meteoric rise of Wild Creations] – “We walked out of Toy Fair a $9M company.”

15:34 “It was scary, it was really scary.”

15:53 [How honesty and communication allowed them to ship on time.] – “Build a relationship with your suppliers so if you have a problem or you have a growth spurt like that, then they are 100% behind you.”

18:10 Power discuss the process of writing the book. “When we started writing it I don’t think we knew what we wanted to say.”

18:45 “The Entrepreneur’s Book of Actions was easier because I knew what I wanted to say.”

19:25 Power lists the “avatars” he interviewed for his book.

20:01 “I wrote it because I think I know what people go through and I wanted to sort out their issues and help them be more successful.”

21:06 “I wanted to break it down for people what the important parts of the book were.”

21:18 “I do believe that action is really the key to success.”

21:42 Why doing something every day for a whole year brings about change.

21:53 Focus on self-change first, then focus on changing your people.

22:01 “In order for our companies to grow, we have to grow.”

22:39 The questions and issues that entrepreneurs and founders often overlook.

22:58 “Sometimes you find that they’re disciplined in their work but their not disciplined in their personal lives.”

23:49 The importance of managing the minutes.

24:27 “I’ve learned the hard way of having to scale up.”

27:01 What a bad experience with an experienced toy consultant taught Power about coaching.

28:00 “Founders and entrepreneurs, they typically have a vision for how they want to do something.”

28:22 What Power learned from Mark Thompson and Marshall Goldsmith

28:48 “When you run a company the size of our first company, you are the leader and your influence where that company goes.”

29:54 “One of the things that I see is that people feel somewhat embarrassed that they’re seeking advice, that they’re seeking help.”

31:08 Why it’s important to hire a coach that you actually like.

32:12 “First and foremost make a professional mission statement.”

32:56 “Success ultimately boils down to a couple of things. It boils down to your habits, your discipline, and your ability to figure out what’s important.”

Expert Bio

Rhett Power co-founded Wild Creations in 2007 and quickly built the startup toy company into the 2010 Fastest Growing Business in South Carolina. Wild Creations was named a Blue Ribbon Top 75 US Company by the US Chamber of Commerce and named as one of Inc. Magazine’s 500 Fastest Growing US Companies two years in a row. He and his team have won over 40 national awards for their innovative toys. He was a finalist for Ernst and Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year award in 2011 and was nominated again in 2012. He was recently named as one of the world’s top 100 business bloggers in 2015.

Prior to founding Wild Creations, Rhett worked as an economic and small business development consultant for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), serving 7 years in the former Soviet Republics of Central Asia. Prior to that, he was Director of National Service Programs for Habitat for Humanity, which included being Habitat’s chief liaison with for The White House, Congress, and the Corporation for National Service.

A member of the United States Department of State’s International Speakers Program, Rhett travels the globe speaking about entrepreneurship, leadership, and management alongside the likes of Gates Foundation CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann, AOL Founder Steve Case, and President Barack Obama. He has written for the Huffington Post, Time, and The Wall Street Journal and is a regular columnist for Inc., Success Magazine, and Business Insider.

He served in the US Peace Corps and is a graduate of the University of South Carolina. His second book on entrepreneurship will be published in early 2017 by McGraw Hill. He now has a rapidly growing coaching and consulting practice based in Washington DC and Charleston, South Carolina.

For more information, visit Rhett Power ‘s website.

Contact Info for Rhett Power

Web address:www.rhettpower.com or www.powercoachinggroup.com

Travels from: Washington, DC

Phone: 202.465.7120

Contact:

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154: Better Leaders Equal a Better World – Featured Interview with Courtney Lynch

 

New York Times Bestselling Author, Keynote Speaker, and Leadership Expert

Courtney Lynch talks with Bill Ringle about how each of us can become better leaders and create a better world on My Quest for the Best.

 

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • How integrating leadership development for women allowed Walmart to solve problems at the store level
  • The common challenges that arise from people working together: conflicts or power struggles that need to be resolved; miscommunication around expectations, scheduling, and style; and much more
  • Tips for achieving human connection even when you’re working remotely
  • How to use feedback to be an inspiring leader instead of an alienating leader
  • What it means when high performance teams have the courage for candor

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:02 Lynch tells about how her experiences with the United States Marine Corps shaped her abilities as a leader.

2:48 “I’m not someone who would’ve been able to afford going to graduated school, but thanks to my military service – the GI Bill is a fantastic vehicle – and so I went to law school after my time in uniform, and through the opportunity was able to enter the profession as a full-fledged attorney.”

3:26 Lynch describes how working in the law firm wasn’t the kind of work that she found fulfilling.

4:05 [On creating the startup with Angie Morgan] – “Our firm’s 14 years old, but I still remember the startup days like they were yesterday…there’s a lot of vision, a lot of ambition and that phase of a business. You’re motivated to work hard, and you know you want to add value and you want to have a positive impact.”

4:35 [On having Walmart as a first customer] – “When you’re a tiny little startup and Fortune1 becomes your first customer, you learn a lot quickly.”

5:02 “We didn’t have a strong platform to stand on, but we were incredibly passionate about what we had to offer.”

5:54 [On getting Walmart as a client] – “Walmart was a cold call, but it was an informed cold call.”

6:21 “I realized that the problems Walmart had, the challenges Walmart had…when you’re such a big organization, you’re a cross section of society, just like the Marine Corps…so my thinking was, if they had leadership development experiences, especially for their female employees, problems could be caught at the store level.”

7:06 “We just happened to connect with someone inside their diversity department whose father had served in the Marine Corps and really understood the practical value of leadership development for making any work force better.”

7:54 “I say it’s kudos to Walmart rather than kudos to us for investing in a small, women-owned business.”

8:16 [On why clients contact them] – “It’s people right? Anytime there’s 2, 3, of or more people working together, there’s bound to be friction.”

8:28 “We hear consistent challenges. How do we adopt a better strategy? How do we empower employees? How do we work in a virtual environment? How do we hold people accountable?”

8:41 “The joy of our work is that we get to work across all industries, all verticles, because people are people everywhere they go.”

8:50 [On why organizations contact them] – “Organizations are typically having a pain point, and people not working together as efficiently or as effectively as they could, is what seems to be at the root of it, or, the opposite side is the client or companies experiencing a tremendous amount of success, and they’re having to scale very quickly.”

9:18 “We usually come in when things are going really tough, or when things are just going gangbusters.”

9:47 “Training and development is necessary and definitely a part of what we do, yet our clients bring us in and we integrate very deeply into their business. So everything that we do is about helping the client achieve their business goals.”

10:40 [On working with Facebook as things were moving quickly] – “It was the true pleasure of my career to see that company grow up on the inside and work with their most amazing talented professionals.”

11:30 “We work a lot in the energy industry, with a lot of engineers. “I sent the e-mail I asked for it to be done!” But really it’s about human connection.

11:47 “There’s lots of different ways to connect, and we like to help our clients see the practical ways even in a virtual environment, a fast-paced environment, or an environment of mathematicians, computer scientists, and engineers, greater human connection can happen.”

12:10 Lynch discusses the importance of maintaining spontaneous contact and agenda-less conversation.

12:34 “What can happen when we’re in a virtual world is we can get very task focused.”

13:19 Lynch describes her son’s “the practice after the practice,” noting how connection and bonding occurs in between the places where work and tasks are accomplished.

13:46 [On the inspiration for writing Spark] – “Spark is like our greatest hits album because it was really hard fought in the trenches…[Angie, Sean, and I spent thousands of hours inside the company, and it was such an exciting opportunity to be a student of the best leaders in the world.”

14:24 “Spark was written over a 5-6 year period, even though actually sitting down and writing the book only took about a year, it was those 5-6 years of learning and taking notes and working with so many different talented leaders that really led to “Hey, we learned a lot, and we want to share this so that everyone has an opportunity, everyone who picks up the book, to be a better leader.”

14:59 “Better leaders really do equal a better world, and that’s leaders at all levels.”

15:05 “Anyone has the potential to lead, and if we all just spent a little time practicing it, great things happen within our communities, and our greater world.”

15:50 “I think that our world is becoming more flat. Organizations are starting to trim the hierarchy, people have matrix relationships. So I would encourage someone who’s focused on what they don’t have, when it comes to authority or title, to shift their focus to what they do have.

16:15 Lynch explains how the best leaders guide while the worst leaders mandate and control.

16:51 Leadership is to influence and inspire other people.

17:00 “Some of the most front-line roles that we have in organizations: a front-line sales representative, a receptionist, a new account manager, a front-line invoice processor – these are the people that are making the company run, and if they demonstrate leadership behaviors, they’ll be able to influence their teams and the greater organization.”

17:55 “[Feedback] has to be delivered in a way that doesn’t disrupt ego and stability. There’s ways to give feedback well. I think that all feedback that is delivered effectively begins with a lot of accountability.

18:19 “Feedback isn’t well-received if someone is placing blame while they’re giving it.”

19:00 “There’s a fine line between feedback and complaining.”

19:24 Lynch illustrates the creative leadership model for feedback: giving feedback from a situation, behavior, and impact perspective.

21:17 “A lot of time feedback gets into a really tough place because it becomes accusatory or unduly emotional, and we need to talk about behaviors that people can change, and we need to do it in a way that sets the stage for grace and dignity.”

22:21 “I think that’s the mark of a high performing team: when you can talk about accountability.”

23:00 The four keys to being credible.

23:53 “Self-awareness is the accelerant to our leadership development. If we can anticipate our blind spots and work to take action, that’s growth and that’s where growth happens.”

24:55 The Say/Do Gap concept.

25:05 Lynch explains why leadership doesn’t only happen in the heroic moments.

25:38 “If you’ve made a commitment, are you doing everything it takes to meet those standards that you’ve set?”

26:52 Why you shouldn’t “hide the ball.”

27:23 How people who have been athletes or in athletics often make excellent leaders.

28:05 “When anyone enrolls in any professional development or any academic experience they’re saying, ‘Hey, I want to learn. I want to grow.’ And that growth mindset is highly relevant to us as professionals.”

29:07 Lynch describes a major bump in the road LeadStart faced, and the path they took to overcoming it as a team.

29:55 “Stress has a way of bringing up a lot of unproductive emotions.”

30:28 “People want to buy consulting services from the consultants, they don’t necessarily want to buy that from a third party sales professional.”

32:09 “In those earlier years we really had to ask for those referrals to get them.”

32:27 “Hope is not a strategy. We really needed to be explicit with our clients about what we needed.”

34:24 Lynch describes the differences between the company 14 years ago and the company today.

34:57 “I’m a multi-dimensional thinker. I think broadly, I like to think from a lot of different vantage points. Yet, when it comes to doing, I’m very linear.”

35:29 [On tools and tips for productivity.] – “I jot down the things I must do the next time I’m at work.”

Expert Bio

As a founding partner of Lead Star, Courtney works closely with all levels of leaders as she designs and delivers development programs designed to drive immediate results. Courtney is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling co-author of SPARK: How to Lead Yourself and Others to Greater Success and Leading from the Front, and has written numerous articles on behavior-based leadership and organizational excellence.

She’s been a guest on CNBC, FOX News, and CNN. Courtney’s efforts with Lead Star have been cited in business publications ranging from Fast Company and Inc. to The New York Times. In addition to her work with consulting clients, Courtney served as the Director of the Center for Creative Leadership’s Partner Network, convening and connecting leading consultancies with the Center’s innovative thought leadership, research and development solutions.
Prior to starting Lead Star, Courtney’s professional experiences included service as a Captain in the United States Marine Corps, an attorney at a large law firm, and a sales manager for Rational Software. She holds a law degree from William & Mary, an undergraduate degree from North Carolina State University and completed intensive studies at Cambridge University. Courtney lives with her husband and three children in Glen Allen, Virginia.

For more information on Courtney Lynch, visit the Lead Star website.

Contact Info for Courtney Lynch

Web address: www.leadstar.us

Travels from: Fairfax, VA

Phone: (703) 273-7280

Connect on Social Media:

LinkedIn Twitter YouTube YouTube

Resources Mentioned by Courtney Lynch:

152: Putting People First – Featured Interview with Jonathan Raymond

Jonathan Raymond, Owner of Refound

Jonathan Raymond talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about the culture of accountability, the proper way to give feedback, and developing an organization that puts people first.

 

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • Why organizations are putting so much thought into a “people first” culture
  • How to give feedback without micromanaging
  • How a software company gave their senior management the room to play at the level of their title
  • The one mistake organizations make over and over again
  • The importance of embracing uncertainty

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:10 Raymond recounts his first real experience in entrepreneurship, telling about the “driveway car wash’ he owned with his friends.

1:33 [On lessons learned from this early venture] – “One of the lessons was the operating costs are always higher than you think they are.”

1:50 “Any industry worth being in is crowded.”

2:15 How law school taught Raymond to show up in the world in a professional way.

2:53 “My education in law school really helped me write with some structure, rather than just stream of consciousness, but to actually put one idea after the next in a way where something builds.”

3:05 “A lawyer is able to string a series of good ideas together and build an argument, right? Which is what a good book or a good blog post is: it’s a good argument for advocating a a piece of change.”

3:45 Raymond describes what it was like working 3 jobs out of law school, and still barely being able to cover rent. 

4:04 [Paraphrasing Andy Warhol] – “You know you’re on track in your life when you’re using the best and the worst of what’s happened to you over the course of your journey.”

4:26 “If I want to have an impact in the world, I’m going to have to take some steps, and there’s going to be some painful moments along the way.”

4:52 [On Raymond’s Clients at Refound] – “I think the biggest problem we help people with, I would say, is overwhelm and ambiguity.”

4:55 “In most modern organizations, there’s a lot of thought being put into ‘How do we create a people first culture? How do we engage with employees? How do we create the conditions where people feel like they’re coming to work not just to create profit for owners and shareholders, but a sense of personal meaning.”

5:27 “What we’ve been able to do is offer a real tactical approach for how to do, in particular, feedback and accountability in an organization that really grounds the way people operate on a day to day basis.”

5:53 “Where organizations go sideways, and where things start to degrade, is in the actual conversations between managers and employees, between managers and one another, and, very importantly, between managers and senior executives.”

7:39 [Case Study Software Company in south bay, CA] – “There was this big aha moment, which is fairly common, where all of the managers in the organization [realized] how they were sort of playing a level down or two levels down from their title.”

8:26 “It’s incremental. Nothing changes overnight. Nothing worth doing changes overnight.”

9:09 “And that’s really the best part of this work for me. I get to see people take these tools and apply them in ways that I never would’ve thought, and have conversations that are meaningful to them.”

9:44 [On Raymond’s inspiration for writing the book] – “I bumped up against my own capacity as a leader, and I realized that I didn’t know what I was doing.”

10:23 How Raymond’s experience with cold, unfeeling training programs led him to create a work that was truly human.

10:26 “It’s not about being authentic, because “being authentic,” well, what does that mean? But, you know, how do you show up in a way that’s both professional and personal, that’s warm and kind and compassionate, but that also drives results?”

11:15  The type of feedback that makes people uncomfortable, and the scourge of the “Millennials boogeyman.”

11:57 [On the reluctance to new processes and change] – “People have been burned before.”

12:31 “This points to the tragedy of what’s happening right now in otherwise really interesting space in time, is that we’re radically over investing in technology to solve this problem, and radically underinvesting in training.”

12:59 [The mistake organizations make again and again] – “Buying tools and technology to solve human problems.”

13:39 Why managers are so hesitant to give feedback.

14:24 “To be able to embrace a communications methodology that says, ‘Actually, you know what, uncertainty is your best friend.’”

14:40 “If your feedback provides a solution, it’s not feedback, it’s micromanagement.”

15:12 “When we get a solution, when we get a ‘Here’s what you should do next,’ it’s quite disempowering.”

16:15 Raymond reveals some tips for managers.

16:25 “There are very few things we can do that will give us more value than not going into feedback situations cold.”

17:26 [On Accountability] – “We have to reframe what we think of when we say accountability. We can use the word, but if we don’t understand the meaning behind the word, we’re on the wrong track.”

18:07 “Accountability, all it means is responsibility for one’s actions.”

18:35 Why accountability without consequences is ineffective.

19:14 “Accountability is a gift.”

19:50 Raymond shares the layers of developing accountability in an organization.

20:25 [The key to accountability] – “The key is communication where people say, ‘You know what? I’m holding myself accountable for this, and you, Sir or Ms. Manager, I want your help.”

21:13 “We’re not very mindful as a species, we tend to be kind of reactive.”

21:35 How to “name what we feel” when giving constructive feedback.

21:58 “We can’t change behavior if we don’t know what the behavior is.”

22:33 “People will surprise you.”

22:47 “Oftentimes that’s what we need, we need boundaries. We need structure for what does excellent work look like.”

23:25 “If you get to do whatever you want, whenever you want with no consequences and no structure, you’re not really helping your teammates, you’re not really helping the organization in any directed, vision oriented way.”

23:44 “A good sales conversation has structure, it has flow – you have pieces that you want to cover; but it also has substance – it’s how you show up, and how you relate, and how you listen.”

24:49 How structure, communication, and substance go hand in hand.

25:37 “What unifies the organizations that are doing this well is participation from executives in a very specific way.”

26:10 [On the importance of recognizing where we are.] – “We’re very good at making big pronouncements of how it’s going to be in the future.”

27:14 “You actually have a lot more latitude, a lot more leeway with the people in your organization than you think.”

27:25 “You don’t have to fix the organization this afternoon. You just have to own that there are problems.”

27:49 “The frustration comes from when management and leadership tries to whitewash [problems].”

28:26 “I think it’s interesting that organizations have found themselves in this position of having to apologize for holding people accountable for being jerks.”

29:49 The problem with taking half measures.

31:12 “Don’t boast about what you’re going to do, let actions speak for themselves.”

32:05 What Raymond reads to stay on top of current trends.

33:02 The tools Raymond uses to stay productive.

Jonathan Raymond’s Bio

After twenty years of not being able to decide whether he was a business development guy or a personal growth teacher, Jonathan stopped trying to figure it out. He’s the owner of Refound, an online training startup that offers Good Authority training programs for owners, executives, and managers. He’s madly in love with his wife, tries not to spoil his daughter, and will never give up on the New York Knicks. Jonathan is the former CEO and Chief Brand Officer of eMyth, where he led the transformation of a global coaching brand and has worked in tech, clean tech, and the nonprofit world after graduating law school in 1998. He lives in Ashland, Oregon, a lovely town that’s too far away from a warm ocean.

For more information, visit Jonathan Raymond’s website.

Contact Info for Jonathan Raymond

Web address: www.refound.com

Travels from: Ashland, OR

Phone: (541) 690-5212

Contact:

LinkedIn Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Jonathan Raymond:

Joe Calloway

142: Focus on WOM – Featured Interview with Joe Calloway

Business Author, Consultant and Speaker

Joe Calloway, author of Magnetic, talks with Bill Ringle about being intentional about attracting new business and satisfying your existing customers.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The importance of committing to make every business experience to be a positive one for all involved
  • How to get more positive WOM (word of mouth)
  • The single most important strategic asset for many companies and how it relates to your relationship with your customers.
  • What he said to correct a misunderstanding, even when it came at significant out-of-pocket expense to replace 600 of the wrong title books sent to the meeting planner

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:03 Calloway recounts his childhood experience with entrepreneurship despite growing up in a small town with a father who was not, by any means, an entrepreneur.

1:53 “From an early age I was into selling stuff. I mowed a million yards, I raked a trillion yards. I think part of that came from my dad…if there was something special that I wanted, he would say ‘That’s great, how much money do you have saved up?’”

3:00 How Calloway transitioned from an interest in politics to a career in business.

3:49 [Recalling a stint in a real estate agency] – “The way I got paid was based on how much all the agents made, it was based on all the revenue generated in the firm, and that’s where I got big by the bug of ‘What can I come up with or what can I pass along in terms of ideas that will help other people be more successful?’ Because the more successful they were, it had an absolute direct impact on my own income.”

5:00 “I just am really good at paying attention. And that was my technique and my method, and I do it to this day, my job is to study the marketplace, and to look for individuals and organizations, businesses large and small, across the board, every kind of industry, and profession, and business you can imagine, and what I look for is quite simply this: who are the ones who are the market leaders who are successful and able to sustain that success?”

5:55 “What is it that top performers do that any of us could do if we just chose to?”

6:18 “It’s not easy to succeed in business, but it’s not a mystery. I don’t believe there are any secrets to success. I think the ideas that work are right out there in the open for all of us. So it’s a matter of getting intentional about using those ideas and doing the hard work necessary to execute on those ideas.”

7:58 Calloway describes why it’s important for people in this industry to stay relevant.

8:17 “I have to stay relevant, which means I’ve got to stay current on what is working in the marketplace.”

8:31 [On being hirable as a speaker] – “I work really hard at having a deep understanding of who is in my audience.”

9:04 The significance of tying what you’re speaking about to the audience you’re addressing, regardless of whether or not you’re an industry expert.

9:26 “You can have what you think is the greatest idea in the world, and be very passionate about it, but if other people don’t want it, if they don’t see the need for it, then you’ve got a hobby, you don’t have a business.”

11:00 Calloway asks the question: What’s the competitive advantage of being easy to do business with?

13:05 [On how to address people in an industry you’re not an expert in] – “What I can do is help make the link between ‘Here’s the principle, here’s the illustration of it, and here’s quite clearly what it has to do with you and your business.’”

14:20 “I perceive myself as being more of a facilitator than a speechmaker, because…I want to facilitate their thinking in a way that’s useful when they go back to work.”

14:50 [On what small businesses all say] – “How do I get customers, keep customers, and attract more customers?”

15:25 “It’s not what you say about yourself that matters one way or another, it’s what other people are saying about you, it’s what your customers are saying.”

16:08 [On using the internet and social media to you’re advantage] – “My biggest energy isn’t about what I post on social media, it’s about being intentional about creating a customer experience that is so compelling that my customers are saying things that drive new business to me.”

16:35 [On the worth of positive word of mouth] – “The biggest force in being magnetic is passed through word of mouth.”

17:25 The story of Western Water Works California and what they’ve done to become a market leader.

19:58 “The single greatest competitive advantage out there is satisfied customers.”

21:30 [On not apologizing to customers] “A lot of businesses [who] find themselves apologizing frequently to customers – well, hello, that’s a clue that you need to back up and solve whatever’s causing you to have to apologize.”

21:50 How a humble response to an honest mistake – but a big one since he sent 600 of the wrong title books sent to the meeting planner – kept chaos at bay and even made the situation better than expected.

23:14 “The point though is this, you don’t argue with a customer, you make it right, and you make it right so overwhelmingly that they say, ‘Ok, you just knocked my socks off. I’m going to talk about this.’

25:28 A nod to Warren Buffett and a discussion of the importance of using “no” to narrow your focus.

26:30 “Over the years, little by little, I’ve learned that it makes me a lot of money over the long haul to stick with what I do best and let other people do what they do best.”

27:45 How having a low tolerance level for jerks can be an effective filter in creating new business.

28:35 “I think it serves people really well to say ‘No’ more often, because it actually creates opportunity for the right things.”

29:20 Why you should say no to or walk away from those clients whose philosophy is in conflict with your philosophy.

31:15 [On saying no to clients who will be a drain on your energy] “Even though it’s money, it’s not good money.
32:35 The story of the Saint Paul Saints and how the owner’s dedication to hiring great people and getting out of their way makes the organization successful.

34:48 [The Saint Paul Saints method] – “If you hire the right people, you can totally turn them loose as long as they understand the direction that the business is going, you’ll be successful.

35:07 [The Saint Paul Saints method cont.] – “Fun is good.”

36:51 Pig-asso the baseball delivering pig.

37:10 “If people like doing business with you, that is a competitive advantage.”

37:55 How Old Dominion Trade Line simplifies their company language to encourage personal responsibility and ensure employees’ high performance.

40:00 [Paraphrasing Steve Jobs] – “If you can make things simple, you can move mountains.”

41:27 [On how expanding focus can lead to losing magnetic mojo] – “One trap that’s easy to fall into is to say ‘We could also do this, and we could also do that, and we can also this service, and we could also offer those products.’ Which might be the right thing to do, but we often stretch ourselves way beyond where we should be in terms of trying to do too many things.”

42:16 “For every ten ideas I have, for nine of them the market says ‘No, I don’t think so.’”

43:19 “You have to change to stay relevant. You have to improve, you have to innovate. But you’ve always got to create value in the eyes of the customers, otherwise it won’t work.”

43:45 [On reevaluating inventory] “We all need to periodically sit down with ourselves or with our teams and ask ‘Where are we spending way too much energy?”

46:02 Calloway’s daily rituals for productivity and success.

47:28 “You have to work at constantly being sure that you, and everyone else, are focused on what is most important.”

Expert Bio

Joe Calloway is a business author, consultant, and speaker who has served Coca-Cola, Verizon, and American Express among other well-known corporations. He also works with medical practices, law firms, and a range of professional services groups. Joe is the Executive in Residence at the Belmont University Center for Entrepreneurship.

Joe is the author of Be the Best at What Matters Most and five other business books that have been well-received by publications like The New York Times, Retailing Today, and Publisher’s Weekly.

His latest book is Magnetic: The Art of Attracting Business.

For more information, visit Joe’s website.

Contact Info for Joe Calloway

Web address: www.JoeCalloway.com

Travels from: Nashville, TN

Phone: (615) 429-7600

Contact:
LinkedIn Facebook Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Joe Calloway:

scott_ginsberg

131: Hello, My Name is Scott – Featured Interview with Scott Ginsberg

The Nametag Guy/Founder, Hello, My Name is Scott

Scott Ginsberg talks with Bill Ringle about approachability, embracing failure, and the advantages of “Try-Listen-Leverage” as a business tactic.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The importance of “I did” versus ideas.
  • The advantages of just jumping into the abyss with “Try, Listen, Leverage”.
  • About joining versus buying brands.
  • What is a “brand tag.”
  • How you can learn to fail with style.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:04 How Ginsberg’s fascination with approachability led him to conduct some ultimately successful experiments in college.

1:55 [Ideas vs. Execution] – “You don’t need an idea, you need an I did.”

2:54 “It is a mindset, execution, it’s sort of a way of life, and there are key distractions and things people need to get rid of. And it’s not about productivity, it’s not about ‘getting things done,’ it’s about creating a filter for your life.”

3:21 “It’s about being willing to delete the people, being willing to delete the processes, and deleting the irrelevant stuff that’s just killing you.”

4:27 [On ready, aim, fire] – “A) you’re never ready, B) aiming is overrated, and C) fire burns people.”

4:37 “Try, Listen, Leverage.”

4:45 [On Try, Listen, Leverage] – “You just try stuff, you just jump, you take the risk whether it’s a blog post or a new product or an idea or you wanna create a group on Facebook. Just try it. You listen, you see what happens, and then you leverage it. If it works, then great! If not, you move on.”

5:25 “You gotta fail yourself to success.”

5:40 “I’m actually not afraid of failing. I fail all the time. I love failing. I feel like failing is the best way to learn. I think it’s more fun. I think it makes a better story.”

5:59 “Can you imagine anything more terrifying than getting exactly what you want?”

6:40 [Paraphrasing Estée Lauder] – “Men buy brands, but women join them.”

6:48 “We should invite people to join our brand, not ask them to buy it, because it’s a totally different mindset, not to mention heartset.”

7:12 [On branding his company] – “What I wanted to do was create a piece of art that makes the mission more than a statement. It’s not just some sense that people memorize or something people stick on the wall.”

7:50 [On brand tagging] – “I don’t think people should wear a name tag everyday. I think they should find something that takes their identity and shares it.”

8:40 “My job is to come in as both a writer and translator to interview the key people and hang out for a couple hours and find out: who are these people, what’s important to them, why are they. What’s the why behind what they do?”

9:25 “Never fall in love with your own inventory.”

9:48 “Every brand tag has an intentional typo. It’s put in there as a reminder to be human, to be imperfect, and that’s a good way to get conversations started too.”

10:50 The importance of injecting life into your company mission with the use of a brand tag.

13:20 “Execution and commitment are part of my constitution. It’s not just what I do, that’s who I am.”

13:53 [On creating motivation for yourself] – “I don’t have deadlines, I have smell dates.”

15:15 Ginsberg’s experience giving a speech to a Rotary club, and how an audience member’s encouragement made him think.

15:45 “When you have a topic like approachability or you address an issue like execution, you frame it in a way where you can meet people where they are, and you can let them put themselves into your equation.”

16:40 “You open yourself to a lot of new markets, and a lot of it has to do with your willingness to just stick it out there and to be open and to be welcoming when people add different angles to your theme.”

17:34 “The first word after no is next.”

18:00 “I don’t work with people I don’t like, and I don’t have clients that annoy me to no end.”

18:18 “Part of execution is knowing when to say no. I’d rather be known for things I don’t do.”

19:02 “I think the secret is coming to this realization that saying ‘No’ to the good you make room to say ‘Yes’ to the best.”

19:38 “You gotta know where you suck.”

19:45 “I’m not much of a team player, I work really well alone. It’s my style, it’s my personality type. I love people, I crave human interaction and I have to have it every day. But when it comes to my work, I have to do it alone.”

21:39 Ginsberg’s daily routines for success and productivity.

Expert Bio

Scott Ginsberg transformed wearing a nametag into a six figure enterprise. His publishing/consulting company, HELLO, my name is Scott! offers an array of products and services. Dubbed “The Authority on Approachability” and voted as St. Louis’s “Young Entrepreneur of the Year” in 2008 by The St. Louis Small Business Monthly, Scott is the author of twelve books including HELLO, my name is ScottThe Power of ApproachabilityHow to be That Guy and Make a Name for Yourself.

Scott gives presentations, breakout sessions, keynote speeches and seminars to tens of thousands of people each year. Companies and organizations worldwide, including Staples, Verizon Wireless, and Boeing, have been successfully implementing his programs on approachability since 2003. He is regularly interviewed by and writes for major media outlets.

Scott is the only person in the world who wears a nametag 24-7 to make people friendlier. (In case you’re wondering, he has a nametag tattooed on his chest for certain occasions.)

For more information, visit the Hello, My Name is Scott website.

 

Contact Info for Scott Ginsberg

Business Phone: 314-256-1800

Web address: Hello, My Name is Scott

Travels From: St. Louis, MO

Follow Scott: twitter

Books by Scott Ginsberg

mark sanborn

126: Become a Presentologist – Featured Interview with Mark Sanborn

President of Sanborn & Associates, Award-winning Speaker, and Bestselling Author

Mark Sanborn talks to Bill Ringle about how becoming a more effective leader means focusing less on the future, and more on the present.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • What clients really want to hear from consultants and what audiences want to hear from speakers.
  • Ways in which change itself has changed.
  • A key question that effective leaders ask daily to build a shared sense of vision and progress.
  • How leaders at any level can share what matters most to help an organization move more rapidly towards business success.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:35 Sanborn describes how the origins of his career path began with public speaking in 4H.

2:21 “The reason why that’s important is that the [experience in 4H] got me down a path of learning how to speak well. Through speaking I started to understand the process of mastery.”

2:50 “[Youth Organization Leadership and public speaking] combined together to create a great interest in how leaders communicate, how leaders influence others, how they create great organizations that deliver extraordinary service.”

3:21 [On his company] “We work with leaders at every level, showing them through my speaking and through my books and my advising, how to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary.”

3:41 “For anyone to get better at anything, [it] begins with desire.”

3:51 “Those people who want to improve have taken the first and most important step in the process. But they now have to figure out how to channel that desire into action.”

4:15 The two reasons why there’s no better reason to be alive if you want to learn how to lead than now.

5:01 “I think probably today the biggest challenge [if you want to learn how to lead] is evaluating which ones are really good…the real challenge is to find those resources which will best help you with your particular needs and desires become better at leading.”

5:42 [On the biggest roadblocks for leaders] – “Today leaders struggle with uncertainty. There’s always been uncertainty in the world. I’ve heard some of my colleagues say we’ve always had change, change is nothing new. I think change itself has changed. I think its more complex. I think it’s happening at a greater speed. I think that there are challenges happening with change that we didn’t have 5 years ago, much less 50 years ago.”

6:16 “I think the very nature of change is that uncertainty has become so unpredictable that’s its hard to know day to day, week to week, month to month what we should be doing.”

6:23 “One of the things that I’ve tried to do in my work is focus less on trying to predict the future, less on being a futurist, and more on being a presentologist. A presentologist isn’t somebody that predicts the future, they’re somebody who’s pretty sure, based on what’s going on, in what they can foresee in the future. They’re sure about what needs to be done now.”

6:51 [On the importance of creating shared focus] – “Leaders not only have to be focused on doing the right things, but they need to create shared focus. In other words, they need to identify what we should be doing now, to hedge our bets, assure our success, mitigate the downturns, if you will, and then they need to make sure that those things are being done.”

7:28 [Paraphrasing Scott Ginsberg], “What are the three or four things you do everyday to ensure your ongoing success.”

8:07 “The reality is that there are a few, a very few [things we do every day] that really create the majority of our results and our success.”

8:15 The significance of creating a structure that creates focus in times of potential uncertainty.

8:41 “If business development is key, you need to make sure that everybody from the person who answers the phone, to the salespeople, to the ones who work in the warehouse know their job perspective…Everybody needs to know, even if their job isn’t specifically business development, how their job impacts business development.”

9:55 [On building the structure that supports the philosophy of focus] – “What I suggest is you work with each of the people you lead, begin with yourself, but each of the people you lead to identify their MVP activities. We know in sports being an MVP is for most valuable player, but in this sense it stands for most valuable and profitable activities. And that simply means that you look at all the things you do every day through that lens of focus and you say ‘What are those key things, those most valuable and profitable activities, that will give us the biggest payback on our investment of time and energy and expertise”

11:00 “If you could spend 60-80% of every day on your most valuable and profitable activities, you would a) be almost laser-like in your focus, but more importantly you would increase dramatically the results you enjoy.”

11:40 [The difference between activity and accomplishment] – “Life isn’t about how busy you are, it’s about the results you create. There are times when we can accomplish more by doing less, by editing out the unimportant, or the trivial, or the insignificant.”

12:53 Sanborn describes his experiences in branding himself as an author, and discusses some of the key points of his most famous works.

15:10 “People are less interested in what you and I have learned or done, what they ultimately want to know is what they can learn from what we’ve learned or done.”

Expert Bio

Mark Sanborn, CSP, CPAE, is president of Sanborn & Associates, Inc., an idea studio dedicated to developing leaders in business and in life. Mark is an international bestselling author and noted authority on leadership, team building, customer service and change.

Mark holds the Certified Speaking Professional designation from the National Speakers Association (NSA), is a member of the Speaker Hall of Fame, and recently served as the president of the National Speakers Association. He was recently honored with the Cavett Award, the highest honor the NSA bestows on its members, in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the speaking profession. Mark is also a member of the exclusive Speakers Roundtable, made up of 20 of the top speakers in America.

Mark is the author of seven books, including TeamBuilt: Making Teamwork Work, Sanborn on Success, and Upgrade: Proven Strategies for Dramatically Increasing Personal and Professional Success. Mark’s book The Fred Factor: How Passion in Your Work and Life Can Make the Ordinary Extraordinary is an international bestseller. His most recent release, You Don’t Need a Title to be a Leader, is making an impact on leadership development at every level. He has created and appeared in 20 videos and numerous audio training programs. His video series Team Building: How to Motivate and Manage People made it to the #2 spot for bestselling educational video series in the U.S.

Mark’s list of over 1,500 clients includes Capital One, Costco, Enterprise Rent-a-Car, FedEx, and many similar major players.

For more information, visit Mark’s website.

Contact Info for Mark Sanborn

Business Phone: 1-800-650-3343

Web address: MarkSanborn.com

Travels From: Denver, CO

Follow Mark:

Twitter Linked In Facebook

Books by Mark Sanborn

   

 

jj ramberg

Set Your Standards Higher – Featured Interview with JJ Ramberg

Author and Host of MSNBC’s “Your Business”

MSNBC’s “Your Business” show host JJ Ramberg talks to Bill Ringle about hiring better and developing a team with world class standards.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • Tactics she uses to thrive as both a journalist and an entrepreneur
  • The importance of having clear criteria for building your team
  • The one question you can ask a new hire to send the message that you care about high standards
  • How to prepare a response to the question, “How can I help?” so that the result is win-win
  • Keys to building good business relationships
  • Book marketing secrets to share your message widely

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:04 JJ began as a journalist, and her parents and brother were all entrepreneurs.

3:03 JJ and her brother, Ken, work well together because they have mutual respect and trust, and they recognize each others’ skills.

4:46 The biggest challenge at the start was convincing skeptics that doing something so simple (using GoodSearch.com as one’s primary search engine) could actually make a tangible impact.

7:23 JJ and Ken saw how effective and successful GoodSearch was becoming, both for the causes that were earning quite a bit, as well as the philanthropic impact of so many people wanting to do good on a daily basis, so they created GoodShop and GoodDining, and are not done yet.

9:29 Over 9 million dollars have been raised for these good causes, and over 15 million people have used the site.

11:17 Lisa’s book “It’s Your Business” is all about action-based advice, and she intends for readers to see an idea that they resonate with, put the book down, and go implement that idea.

13:01 One of JJ’s favorite tips is to make it easy for people who offer assistance to actually help, which is done by giving them three specific tasks they can do to help.

16:31 “If somebody asks you for help, give it to them without thinking about ‘what can they do for me later on.’ Building up a network and relationships is about getting people to help you, but it’s also you helping them.”

19:25 JJ sees that people are always striving to improve their business, and she intends her book to assist these folks.

21:11 Once a business owner listens to their customers, they are better equipped to shape their product or business to what the consumers want, which not only serves the business, but more importantly serves the consumers.

23:47 JJ is passionate about and skilled at creating a community around giving business-growing advice, rather than just creating content to sell.

26:21 To stay productive and on track, JJ uses to-do lists and her calendar.

Expert Bio

JJ Ramberg is the host of MSNBC’s Your Business, the only television show dedicated to issues affecting small business owners. Now in its sixth season, the program has profiled thousands of small business owners and offered advice from countless experts and investors. She is also the co-author of It’s Your Business: 183 Essential Tips that Will Transform Your Small Business.

In 2005, JJ and her brother Ken founded GoodSearch.com, a company which turns your everyday activities into ways to give back to your favorite cause. GoodSearch has raised more than $10 million for its participating charities and schools.

JJ has bounced between entrepreneurial activities and journalism throughout her career, having worked as a producer, reporter, and host for CNN and CNNfn, a producer on Dateline NBC, and the director of business development at Cooking.com. She is also a regular contributor to the TODAY Show on small business and financial issues.

For more information, visit JJ’s website.

Contact Info for JJ Ramberg 

Web address: ItsYourBusinessBook.com

Web address: GoodSearch.com | GoodShop.com

Web address: MSNBC “Your Business”

Travels From: Brooklyn, NY

Follow JJ:
Twitter

Books by JJ Ramberg

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