###: Steve Condurelis, author of The Brand New Real Estate Agents Handbook

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Steve Condurelis , author of The Brand New Real Estate Agents Handbook


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Steve Condurelis , author of The Brand New Real Estate Agents Handbook

Broker since 1982
Owner investor, four Keller Williams offices Middle Tennessee
Teacher, speaker, coach,
A survivor of four economic shifts
About the author

40 or so years ago I worked in corporate real estate. Tax advantaged real estate actually, I was young, single, and traveled every week to a new city. My clients were wealthy and searching for ways to avoid paying taxes. Our company delivered that product beautifully. I enjoyed a decent salary and commission.

The family company I worked for had been in business for 40+ years and never lost a dime for its clients. We maintained an excellent national reputation and felt pretty good about ourselves. We made lots of money for our clients and ourselves. Life was good, very good.

Then came the crash. Congress called it the Tax act of 1986. Overnight the U.S. commercial real estate market collapsed. Billions of dollars were lost and thousands of people were laid off. My company declared bankruptcy.

Out of a job and on the street, I was determined to remain in commercial real estate and take full advantage of my excellent training. The interviews were few and far between. I found myself competing with people that had MBA’s and multiple years of experience. It finally became apparent that no one was hiring. Not me, not any of my past co-workers. No one.

Applying for unemployment was out of the question. Somehow that seemed degrading to me.

All the pundents decried that it would take years for the markets to repair themselves. The only industry that offered some hope was the residential sales business. Problem: There was no salary, no per diem, and no bonus structure. There was however, potential.

I began to research the local housing market. It to had suffered setbacks. Top producing agents I spoke with had sold one or two homes over the course of a year. Not pretty.
Following a series of interviews, I was hired by a local leading luxury real estate firm. The owner was a one man show. He was old and becoming older by the day. I figured he had the time and certainly the experience to show me the ropes. I did not realize it at the time but his 45 years plus wisdom began to wear off on me. To me, he was a genius. He took me to all his new listings and he introduced me to each of his clients. Each home tour included a tutorial on how to spot quality home construction and poor quality home construction. He shared his vast knowledge of wisdom with each fine home he listed. More importantly, he shared his secrets of good client service.
I had negotiated a small draw against upcoming sales. 18 months following my start I sold my first home. The total of the draws far exceeded the commission check. I actually owed my broker money. It was worth every penny I owed him.

By and by it came time and the old man announced his retirement. He also announced that he was closing his company. He wasn’t going to sell it, give it away, or merge. He walked out of the office, cut off the lights and never returned.

Back on the street again.

I joined another “up and coming” firm in our luxury market. Like all new agents, they placed me in the bull pen with a desk and a phone. “Here you go, call me with any questions”. No formal training. No draw. You sell or you starve.
I began working other agents open houses. I was told that the vast majority of people walking through an open house don’t buy it. This would be my chance to get to know possible buyers or sellers. Attendance was lackluster. The one or two clients that wandered in taught me so many wonderful lessons. Most times they were not there to buy. They were curious neighbors or friends of the sellers. Some said that they were looking for decorating ideas. More than a few Open House days resulted in zero attendance. The hours were long, lonely, silent, and scary.
By the end of that year the top agent in my firm had sold two homes. I had sold none.
My savings were gone, and I was well into the last drops of my retirement account.
Ah ha! I had forgotten about my change jar in the closet!! Quarters first, then dimes, then nickels. Desperation was setting in….
Then it happened. I finally stumbled into a secret I’d not tried before. While holding an open house one Sunday, a lovely young couple showed some interest my listing. They had two younger kids that screamed in anticipation of exploring yet another home. Off they went over all three floors! An hour went by and well into the next. I looked at them and asked, “Well, you’ve spent over an hour here.” “You have asked lots of questions.” “I hope I’ve answered most of them to your satisfaction.” Would you like to buy this house?”

They said yes! What???? I was flabbergasted. Almost a year with no closings ….and they said yes!!
They were shocked that I was so shocked. We wrote an offer and thirty days later, the sale closed.
It was a big -ticket sale and a decent commission check. I was out of the economic basement for a few months. Most importantly, I had learned a lesson I have never forgotten. I learned to ask for the business!
I also learned that I was in desperate need of more education. Lots of it. Off to the bookstore I went. I bought one book at a time. It was all I could afford.
I still had no listings so I asked other agents if I could hold theirs open. Most said yes.
The slowdown continued in our market. No one came my open houses. No one ever seemed to come.
This actually became a career changing blessing for me. Open houses provided the quiet time to read and outline the books I had bought. They kept me company and made the hours spent in an empty home go by a bit more quickly.
I learned to outline each book. I’d record the important stuff on 3×5 cards.
I carried the cards around with me everywhere. I’d pull them out at each red light and study them at open houses.
Over time, the books piled up as well as the 3×5 cards. When would this recession end? The Times were lean, even for the superstars.

Three more years drug by and the education began to pay off. Interest rates dropped from 12 to 9%. The momentum of the market began to pick up. Our town began to grow again. The next 5 years my income more than doubled, and then tripled! The brutal grind had paid off.
I’d finally emerged out of the dark downturn and into the real estate promised land! That was almost 30 years ago. I’ve never forgotten those dark days. The isolation. The lack of income. The beans and rice for dinner.
That was then and this is now.

Historically, 80% of newly licensed agents walk away from their practice before reaching their second year. Good Markets or bad markets. The numbers have hovered in this area for decades. This is heartbreaking to me.

The first goal of this book is to help you decide if residential real estate sales and marketing is for you. You deserve to know.
This book is written to help you discover and appreciate your own personal talents and convictions. If you find out this business is for you, great, if not, then you haven’t waisted much time and money. Pass this book along to someone else.
The second goal of this book is to provide insights that will help assure your success, (should you choose to dive in). Hours, weeks and months were spent in research for this guide. Successful agents from all over the world have offered their opinions. They remember what it was once like to be a rookie. They know what you are about to begin.



Education: University of Tennessee, B.S. Marketing and Economics 1972
Tennessee Broker license, 1982
GRI, (Graduate Realtors Institute
CRS, Certified Residential Specialist
ABR, (Accredited Buyers Broker)
CRB, (Certified Residential Broker)

Co-owner, Investor, Keller Williams Realty, Nashville, Hendersonville, Mt. Juliet, and Franklin, Tn.

Experience: Residential Sales and Listings, 1988-present
Life-Time Award Sales, Greater Nashville Realtors Association
GNR Board of Directors (retired)
Chairman Professional Standards Greater Nashville Realtors Association (retired)
Instructor: listing specialist, buyer representation, new home construction, flip and home renovations, Investment Real Estate, and retirement planning

Entrepreneur: Opened successful businesses in four separate industries, Health and Wellness, Building Maintenance, and general real estate practice, Home Renovations












About the author

40 or so years ago I worked in corporate real estate. Tax advantaged real estate actually, I was young, single, and traveled every week to a new city. My clients were wealthy and searching for ways to avoid paying taxes. Our company delivered that product beautifully. I enjoyed a decent salary and commission.

The family company I worked for had been in business for 40+ years and never lost a dime for its clients. We maintained an excellent national reputation and felt pretty good about ourselves. We made lots of money for our clients and ourselves. Life was good, very good.

Then came the crash. Congress called it the Tax act of 1986. Overnight the U.S. commercial real estate market collapsed. Billions of dollars were lost and thousands of people were laid off. My company declared bankruptcy.

Out of a job and on the street, I was determined to remain in commercial real estate and take full advantage of my excellent training. The interviews were few and far between. I found myself competing with people that had MBA’s and multiple years of experience. It finally became apparent that no one was hiring. Not me, not any of my past co-workers. No one.

Applying for unemployment was out of the question. Somehow that seemed degrading to me.

All the pundents decried that it would take years for the markets to repair themselves. The only industry that offered some hope was the residential sales business. Problem: There was no salary, no per diem, and no bonus structure. There was however, potential.

I began to research the local housing market. It to had suffered setbacks. Top producing agents I spoke with had sold one or two homes over the course of a year. Not pretty.
Following a series of interviews, I was hired by a local leading luxury real estate firm. The owner was a one man show. He was old and becoming older by the day. I figured he had the time and certainly the experience to show me the ropes. I did not realize it at the time but his 45 years plus wisdom began to wear off on me. To me, he was a genius. He took me to all his new listings and he introduced me to each of his clients. Each home tour included a tutorial on how to spot quality home construction and poor quality home construction. He shared his vast knowledge of wisdom with each fine home he listed. More importantly, he shared his secrets of good client service.
I had negotiated a small draw against upcoming sales. 18 months following my start I sold my first home. The total of the draws far exceeded the commission check. I actually owed my broker money. It was worth every penny I owed him.

By and by it came time and the old man announced his retirement. He also announced that he was closing his company. He wasn’t going to sell it, give it away, or merge. He walked out of the office, cut off the lights and never returned.

Back on the street again.

I joined another “up and coming” firm in our luxury market. Like all new agents, they placed me in the bull pen with a desk and a phone. “Here you go, call me with any questions”. No formal training. No draw. You sell or you starve.
I began working other agents open houses. I was told that the vast majority of people walking through an open house don’t buy it. This would be my chance to get to know possible buyers or sellers. Attendance was lackluster. The one or two clients that wandered in taught me so many wonderful lessons. Most times they were not there to buy. They were curious neighbors or friends of the sellers. Some said that they were looking for decorating ideas. More than a few Open House days resulted in zero attendance. The hours were long, lonely, silent, and scary.
By the end of that year the top agent in my firm had sold two homes. I had sold none.
My savings were gone, and I was well into the last drops of my retirement account.
Ah ha! I had forgotten about my change jar in the closet!! Quarters first, then dimes, then nickels. Desperation was setting in….
Then it happened. I finally stumbled into a secret I’d not tried before. While holding an open house one Sunday, a lovely young couple showed some interest my listing. They had two younger kids that screamed in anticipation of exploring yet another home. Off they went over all three floors! An hour went by and well into the next. I looked at them and asked, “Well, you’ve spent over an hour here.” “You have asked lots of questions.” “I hope I’ve answered most of them to your satisfaction.” Would you like to buy this house?”

They said yes! What???? I was flabbergasted. Almost a year with no closings ….and they said yes!!
They were shocked that I was so shocked. We wrote an offer and thirty days later, the sale closed.
It was a big -ticket sale and a decent commission check. I was out of the economic basement for a few months. Most importantly, I had learned a lesson I have never forgotten. I learned to ask for the business!
I also learned that I was in desperate need of more education. Lots of it. Off to the bookstore I went. I bought one book at a time. It was all I could afford.
I still had no listings so I asked other agents if I could hold theirs open. Most said yes.
The slowdown continued in our market. No one came my open houses. No one ever seemed to come.
This actually became a career changing blessing for me. Open houses provided the quiet time to read and outline the books I had bought. They kept me company and made the hours spent in an empty home go by a bit more quickly.
I learned to outline each book. I’d record the important stuff on 3×5 cards.
I carried the cards around with me everywhere. I’d pull them out at each red light and study them at open houses.
Over time, the books piled up as well as the 3×5 cards. When would this recession end? The Times were lean, even for the superstars.

Three more years drug by and the education began to pay off. Interest rates dropped from 12 to 9%. The momentum of the market began to pick up. Our town began to grow again. The next 5 years my income more than doubled, and then tripled! The brutal grind had paid off.
I’d finally emerged out of the dark downturn and into the real estate promised land! That was almost 30 years ago. I’ve never forgotten those dark days. The isolation. The lack of income. The beans and rice for dinner.
That was then and this is now.

Historically, 80% of newly licensed agents walk away from their practice before reaching their second year. Good Markets or bad markets. The numbers have hovered in this area for decades. This is heartbreaking to me.

The first goal of this book is to help you decide if residential real estate sales and marketing is for you. You deserve to know.
This book is written to help you discover and appreciate your own personal talents and convictions. If you find out this business is for you, great, if not, then you haven’t waisted much time and money. Pass this book along to someone else.
The second goal of this book is to provide insights that will help assure your success, (should you choose to dive in). Hours, weeks and months were spent in research for this guide. Successful agents from all over the world have offered their opinions. They remember what it was once like to be a rookie. They know what you are about to begin.



Education: University of Tennessee, B.S. Marketing and Economics 1972
Tennessee Broker license, 1982
GRI, (Graduate Realtors Institute
CRS, Certified Residential Specialist
ABR, (Accredited Buyers Broker)
CRB, (Certified Residential Broker)

Co-owner, Investor, Keller Williams Realty, Nashville, Hendersonville, Mt. Juliet, and Franklin, Tn.

Experience: Residential Sales and Listings, 1988-present
Life-Time Award Sales, Greater Nashville Realtors Association
GNR Board of Directors (retired)
Chairman Professional Standards Greater Nashville Realtors Association (retired)
Instructor: listing specialist, buyer representation, new home construction, flip and home renovations, Investment Real Estate, and retirement planning

Entrepreneur: Opened successful businesses in four separate industries, Health and Wellness, Building Maintenance, and general real estate practice, Home Renovations





Steve Condurelis , author of The Brand New Real Estate Agents Handbook



Steve Condurelis and Bill Ringle discuss The Brand New Real Estate Agents Handbook for small business leaders.


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Expert Bio

Broker since 1982
Owner investor, four Keller Williams offices Middle Tennessee
Teacher, speaker, coach,
A survivor of four economic shifts
About the author

40 or so years ago I worked in corporate real estate. Tax advantaged real estate actually, I was young, single, and traveled every week to a new city. My clients were wealthy and searching for ways to avoid paying taxes. Our company delivered that product beautifully. I enjoyed a decent salary and commission.

The family company I worked for had been in business for 40+ years and never lost a dime for its clients. We maintained an excellent national reputation and felt pretty good about ourselves. We made lots of money for our clients and ourselves. Life was good, very good.

Then came the crash. Congress called it the Tax act of 1986. Overnight the U.S. commercial real estate market collapsed. Billions of dollars were lost and thousands of people were laid off. My company declared bankruptcy.

Out of a job and on the street, I was determined to remain in commercial real estate and take full advantage of my excellent training. The interviews were few and far between. I found myself competing with people that had MBA’s and multiple years of experience. It finally became apparent that no one was hiring. Not me, not any of my past co-workers. No one.

Applying for unemployment was out of the question. Somehow that seemed degrading to me.

All the pundents decried that it would take years for the markets to repair themselves. The only industry that offered some hope was the residential sales business. Problem: There was no salary, no per diem, and no bonus structure. There was however, potential.

I began to research the local housing market. It to had suffered setbacks. Top producing agents I spoke with had sold one or two homes over the course of a year. Not pretty.
Following a series of interviews, I was hired by a local leading luxury real estate firm. The owner was a one man show. He was old and becoming older by the day. I figured he had the time and certainly the experience to show me the ropes. I did not realize it at the time but his 45 years plus wisdom began to wear off on me. To me, he was a genius. He took me to all his new listings and he introduced me to each of his clients. Each home tour included a tutorial on how to spot quality home construction and poor quality home construction. He shared his vast knowledge of wisdom with each fine home he listed. More importantly, he shared his secrets of good client service.
I had negotiated a small draw against upcoming sales. 18 months following my start I sold my first home. The total of the draws far exceeded the commission check. I actually owed my broker money. It was worth every penny I owed him.

By and by it came time and the old man announced his retirement. He also announced that he was closing his company. He wasn’t going to sell it, give it away, or merge. He walked out of the office, cut off the lights and never returned.

Back on the street again.

I joined another “up and coming” firm in our luxury market. Like all new agents, they placed me in the bull pen with a desk and a phone. “Here you go, call me with any questions”. No formal training. No draw. You sell or you starve.
I began working other agents open houses. I was told that the vast majority of people walking through an open house don’t buy it. This would be my chance to get to know possible buyers or sellers. Attendance was lackluster. The one or two clients that wandered in taught me so many wonderful lessons. Most times they were not there to buy. They were curious neighbors or friends of the sellers. Some said that they were looking for decorating ideas. More than a few Open House days resulted in zero attendance. The hours were long, lonely, silent, and scary.
By the end of that year the top agent in my firm had sold two homes. I had sold none.
My savings were gone, and I was well into the last drops of my retirement account.
Ah ha! I had forgotten about my change jar in the closet!! Quarters first, then dimes, then nickels. Desperation was setting in….
Then it happened. I finally stumbled into a secret I’d not tried before. While holding an open house one Sunday, a lovely young couple showed some interest my listing. They had two younger kids that screamed in anticipation of exploring yet another home. Off they went over all three floors! An hour went by and well into the next. I looked at them and asked, “Well, you’ve spent over an hour here.” “You have asked lots of questions.” “I hope I’ve answered most of them to your satisfaction.” Would you like to buy this house?”

They said yes! What???? I was flabbergasted. Almost a year with no closings ….and they said yes!!
They were shocked that I was so shocked. We wrote an offer and thirty days later, the sale closed.
It was a big -ticket sale and a decent commission check. I was out of the economic basement for a few months. Most importantly, I had learned a lesson I have never forgotten. I learned to ask for the business!
I also learned that I was in desperate need of more education. Lots of it. Off to the bookstore I went. I bought one book at a time. It was all I could afford.
I still had no listings so I asked other agents if I could hold theirs open. Most said yes.
The slowdown continued in our market. No one came my open houses. No one ever seemed to come.
This actually became a career changing blessing for me. Open houses provided the quiet time to read and outline the books I had bought. They kept me company and made the hours spent in an empty home go by a bit more quickly.
I learned to outline each book. I’d record the important stuff on 3×5 cards.
I carried the cards around with me everywhere. I’d pull them out at each red light and study them at open houses.
Over time, the books piled up as well as the 3×5 cards. When would this recession end? The Times were lean, even for the superstars.

Three more years drug by and the education began to pay off. Interest rates dropped from 12 to 9%. The momentum of the market began to pick up. Our town began to grow again. The next 5 years my income more than doubled, and then tripled! The brutal grind had paid off.
I’d finally emerged out of the dark downturn and into the real estate promised land! That was almost 30 years ago. I’ve never forgotten those dark days. The isolation. The lack of income. The beans and rice for dinner.
That was then and this is now.

Historically, 80% of newly licensed agents walk away from their practice before reaching their second year. Good Markets or bad markets. The numbers have hovered in this area for decades. This is heartbreaking to me.

The first goal of this book is to help you decide if residential real estate sales and marketing is for you. You deserve to know.
This book is written to help you discover and appreciate your own personal talents and convictions. If you find out this business is for you, great, if not, then you haven’t waisted much time and money. Pass this book along to someone else.
The second goal of this book is to provide insights that will help assure your success, (should you choose to dive in). Hours, weeks and months were spent in research for this guide. Successful agents from all over the world have offered their opinions. They remember what it was once like to be a rookie. They know what you are about to begin.



Education: University of Tennessee, B.S. Marketing and Economics 1972
Tennessee Broker license, 1982
GRI, (Graduate Realtors Institute
CRS, Certified Residential Specialist
ABR, (Accredited Buyers Broker)
CRB, (Certified Residential Broker)

Co-owner, Investor, Keller Williams Realty, Nashville, Hendersonville, Mt. Juliet, and Franklin, Tn.

Experience: Residential Sales and Listings, 1988-present
Life-Time Award Sales, Greater Nashville Realtors Association
GNR Board of Directors (retired)
Chairman Professional Standards Greater Nashville Realtors Association (retired)
Instructor: listing specialist, buyer representation, new home construction, flip and home renovations, Investment Real Estate, and retirement planning

Entrepreneur: Opened successful businesses in four separate industries, Health and Wellness, Building Maintenance, and general real estate practice, Home Renovations












About the author

40 or so years ago I worked in corporate real estate. Tax advantaged real estate actually, I was young, single, and traveled every week to a new city. My clients were wealthy and searching for ways to avoid paying taxes. Our company delivered that product beautifully. I enjoyed a decent salary and commission.

The family company I worked for had been in business for 40+ years and never lost a dime for its clients. We maintained an excellent national reputation and felt pretty good about ourselves. We made lots of money for our clients and ourselves. Life was good, very good.

Then came the crash. Congress called it the Tax act of 1986. Overnight the U.S. commercial real estate market collapsed. Billions of dollars were lost and thousands of people were laid off. My company declared bankruptcy.

Out of a job and on the street, I was determined to remain in commercial real estate and take full advantage of my excellent training. The interviews were few and far between. I found myself competing with people that had MBA’s and multiple years of experience. It finally became apparent that no one was hiring. Not me, not any of my past co-workers. No one.

Applying for unemployment was out of the question. Somehow that seemed degrading to me.

All the pundents decried that it would take years for the markets to repair themselves. The only industry that offered some hope was the residential sales business. Problem: There was no salary, no per diem, and no bonus structure. There was however, potential.

I began to research the local housing market. It to had suffered setbacks. Top producing agents I spoke with had sold one or two homes over the course of a year. Not pretty.
Following a series of interviews, I was hired by a local leading luxury real estate firm. The owner was a one man show. He was old and becoming older by the day. I figured he had the time and certainly the experience to show me the ropes. I did not realize it at the time but his 45 years plus wisdom began to wear off on me. To me, he was a genius. He took me to all his new listings and he introduced me to each of his clients. Each home tour included a tutorial on how to spot quality home construction and poor quality home construction. He shared his vast knowledge of wisdom with each fine home he listed. More importantly, he shared his secrets of good client service.
I had negotiated a small draw against upcoming sales. 18 months following my start I sold my first home. The total of the draws far exceeded the commission check. I actually owed my broker money. It was worth every penny I owed him.

By and by it came time and the old man announced his retirement. He also announced that he was closing his company. He wasn’t going to sell it, give it away, or merge. He walked out of the office, cut off the lights and never returned.

Back on the street again.

I joined another “up and coming” firm in our luxury market. Like all new agents, they placed me in the bull pen with a desk and a phone. “Here you go, call me with any questions”. No formal training. No draw. You sell or you starve.
I began working other agents open houses. I was told that the vast majority of people walking through an open house don’t buy it. This would be my chance to get to know possible buyers or sellers. Attendance was lackluster. The one or two clients that wandered in taught me so many wonderful lessons. Most times they were not there to buy. They were curious neighbors or friends of the sellers. Some said that they were looking for decorating ideas. More than a few Open House days resulted in zero attendance. The hours were long, lonely, silent, and scary.
By the end of that year the top agent in my firm had sold two homes. I had sold none.
My savings were gone, and I was well into the last drops of my retirement account.
Ah ha! I had forgotten about my change jar in the closet!! Quarters first, then dimes, then nickels. Desperation was setting in….
Then it happened. I finally stumbled into a secret I’d not tried before. While holding an open house one Sunday, a lovely young couple showed some interest my listing. They had two younger kids that screamed in anticipation of exploring yet another home. Off they went over all three floors! An hour went by and well into the next. I looked at them and asked, “Well, you’ve spent over an hour here.” “You have asked lots of questions.” “I hope I’ve answered most of them to your satisfaction.” Would you like to buy this house?”

They said yes! What???? I was flabbergasted. Almost a year with no closings ….and they said yes!!
They were shocked that I was so shocked. We wrote an offer and thirty days later, the sale closed.
It was a big -ticket sale and a decent commission check. I was out of the economic basement for a few months. Most importantly, I had learned a lesson I have never forgotten. I learned to ask for the business!
I also learned that I was in desperate need of more education. Lots of it. Off to the bookstore I went. I bought one book at a time. It was all I could afford.
I still had no listings so I asked other agents if I could hold theirs open. Most said yes.
The slowdown continued in our market. No one came my open houses. No one ever seemed to come.
This actually became a career changing blessing for me. Open houses provided the quiet time to read and outline the books I had bought. They kept me company and made the hours spent in an empty home go by a bit more quickly.
I learned to outline each book. I’d record the important stuff on 3×5 cards.
I carried the cards around with me everywhere. I’d pull them out at each red light and study them at open houses.
Over time, the books piled up as well as the 3×5 cards. When would this recession end? The Times were lean, even for the superstars.

Three more years drug by and the education began to pay off. Interest rates dropped from 12 to 9%. The momentum of the market began to pick up. Our town began to grow again. The next 5 years my income more than doubled, and then tripled! The brutal grind had paid off.
I’d finally emerged out of the dark downturn and into the real estate promised land! That was almost 30 years ago. I’ve never forgotten those dark days. The isolation. The lack of income. The beans and rice for dinner.
That was then and this is now.

Historically, 80% of newly licensed agents walk away from their practice before reaching their second year. Good Markets or bad markets. The numbers have hovered in this area for decades. This is heartbreaking to me.

The first goal of this book is to help you decide if residential real estate sales and marketing is for you. You deserve to know.
This book is written to help you discover and appreciate your own personal talents and convictions. If you find out this business is for you, great, if not, then you haven’t waisted much time and money. Pass this book along to someone else.
The second goal of this book is to provide insights that will help assure your success, (should you choose to dive in). Hours, weeks and months were spent in research for this guide. Successful agents from all over the world have offered their opinions. They remember what it was once like to be a rookie. They know what you are about to begin.



Education: University of Tennessee, B.S. Marketing and Economics 1972
Tennessee Broker license, 1982
GRI, (Graduate Realtors Institute
CRS, Certified Residential Specialist
ABR, (Accredited Buyers Broker)
CRB, (Certified Residential Broker)

Co-owner, Investor, Keller Williams Realty, Nashville, Hendersonville, Mt. Juliet, and Franklin, Tn.

Experience: Residential Sales and Listings, 1988-present
Life-Time Award Sales, Greater Nashville Realtors Association
GNR Board of Directors (retired)
Chairman Professional Standards Greater Nashville Realtors Association (retired)
Instructor: listing specialist, buyer representation, new home construction, flip and home renovations, Investment Real Estate, and retirement planning

Entrepreneur: Opened successful businesses in four separate industries, Health and Wellness, Building Maintenance, and general real estate practice, Home Renovations

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