Work culture and Change Archives • My Quest for the Best

Category Archives for "Work culture and Change"

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217: Cameron Mitchell, author of YES IS THE ANSWER. WHAT IS THE QUESTION

Cameron Mitchell, author of YES IS THE ANSWER. WHAT IS THE QUESTION

Cameron Mitchell and Bill Ringle discuss YES IS THE ANSWER. WHAT IS THE QUESTION: How Faith In People and a Culture Of Hospitality Built A Modern American Restaurant Company

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top 3 Take-Aways from this Interview

  • How a chocolate milkshake is served to each employee at his/her first day and is told the story of how it symbolizes the "yes" attitude of service at the company.  
  • Why our attitude is a crucial aspect of how we approach a business or leadership position... and a  barometer of how we are viewed. 
  • The "Must Have" five pillars of every business describes your vision for your team and your identity to your customers and the outside world. 

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

Always surround yourself with great people.>> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet Yes requires action, No requires no action.>> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet Have a mentor with whom you can always learn from and grow professionally.>> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet You cannot survive in an organization unless you believe in the organization's cultural philosophy. >> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet Growth of the people is most important, it always translates into the growth of the business.>> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet If things aren't good outside of work, they can't be good at work.>> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet We are better today than yesterday, and better tomorrow than we are today.>> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet Every human organization are not perfect, we make mistakes.>> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet The three A's that can soothe an angry customer: Acknowledge, Apologize, and Act. >> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet People are people – we all have the same wants, needs, and basic values. >> #MQ4B Ep217 with Cameron Mitchell (@CMRColumbus), author of YES IS THE ANSWER Click To Tweet

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Expert Bio 

Cameron Mitchell, a lifelong entrepreneur and accomplished businessman, graduated from the Culinary Institute of America when he was 22 years old and has developed 18 different restaurant concepts, including Mitchell’s Fish Market and Mitchell’s Steakhouse, a total of 22 restaurants, that were sold to Ruth’s Hospitality Group for $92 million in 2008.

To this day, Cameron Mitchell Restaurants remains independent and privately held recognizing over $300 million in combined annual revenue from its food service operations consisting of 60 restaurants, Cameron Mitchell Premier Events, The Budd Dairy Food Hall and its sister company, The Rusty Bucket Restaurant and Tavern.

Mitchell has built CMR around the philosophy, “The answer is yes. What is the question?” and by making a Raving Fan out of every person touched by the business, from associates, to guests to delivery drivers at the back door.

It’s a simple statement that serves as the backbone of how the company identifies itself as “great people delivering genuine hospitality.”

MQ4B-Cameron Mitchell

Contact Info for Cameron Mitchell

Web address: www.cameronmitchell.com

Travels from: Austin, TX

 Social  Media Links:

​Books Authored by the Guest

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

Susan Packard, author of FULLY HUMAN

216: Develop Your Emotional Fitness as a Leader: Interview with Susan Packard

Susan Packard, author of FULLY HUMAN

Susan Packard and Bill Ringle discuss how to grow your emotional fitness in work, leadership. and life.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top 3 Take-Aways from this Interview

  • The essence of good leadership is to take care of yourself and others, and to do so requires emotional fitness.
  • Being fully human at work and in your life means committing to a wider range of standards than just output or productivity. 
  • Trust is the lifeblood of any organization, from a start-up to an enterprise like HGTV. 

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

Looking at time as a resource really helps you to navigate your life wisely.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetSometimes people need to air out the things that have kept them stuck.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetWe do what we have been trained to do.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetStart something that you personally love but do make sure that you have a market big enough to sustain your business.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetPeople want to work for people that they respect, trust, and feel connected to.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetIn anything you do, consider the customer first.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetIf you are running a business and not thinking about the customers, you are not going to be in business for long.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetIf you want to change your product, always talk with your customers.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetAlways make sure you build titanium strength culture so you have the benefit of your people's experience as part of your decision making.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To Tweet

Interview Insights

Read the Show Notes from this Episode

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Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

Author and entrepreneur Susan Packard was one of a small number of women leaders who were a part of the newly created cable industry, helping in the launch of HBO and CNBC. She went on to be a co-founder of HGTV and Scripps Network.

An in-demand speaker at summits, TEDX, and corporate events, as well as a guest expert on television and radio, and op-ed contributor, Packard is a pioneer in both the industry she helped to shape and the workplace she works to redefine.

She is the author of New Rules of the Game and the just released Fully Human: 3 Steps to Grow your Emotional Fitness in Work, Leadership and Life.

MQ4B-Featured-Susan Packard, Author of Fully Human

Contact Info for Susan Packard

Web address: www.susanpackard.com

Travels from: Lakeville, CT

 Social  Media Links:

​Books Authored by the Guest

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

214: Apply Recovery Strategies in Your Leadership – interview with Christie Aschwanden

Christie Aschwanden, author of Good to Go

Christie Aschwanden and Bill Ringle discuss what the athlete in all of us can learn from the strange science of recovery.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top 3 Take-Aways from this Interview

  • How overworking can reduce your effectiveness as an athlete or a business leader.
  • The similarities between overtraining and overworking.
  • The importance of scheduling time to decompress and recover between work activities.

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

Interview Insights

Read the Show Notes from this Episode

Subscribe to My Quest for the Best on Your Favorite App

Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

Christie Aschwanden is the author of GOOD TO GO: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn From the Strange Science of Recovery and co-host of EMERGING FORM, a podcast about the creative process.

She’s the former lead science writer at FiveThirtyEight and was previously a health columnist for The Washington Post. Christie is a frequent contributor to The New York Times. She’s also been a contributing editor for Runner’s World and a contributing writer for Bicycling.

Her work appears in dozens of publications, including Discover, Slate, Consumer Reports, New Scientist, More, Men’s Journal, Mother Jones, NPR.org, Smithsonian and O, the Oprah Magazine.

MQ4B-Featured-Christie Aschwanden

Contact Info for Christie Aschwanden

Web address: www.christieaschwanden.com

Travels from: Cedaredge, CO

 Social  Media Links:

​Books Authored by the Guest

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

213: Asking Better Questions Improves Business: an interview with Warren Berger

Warren Berger, author of The Book of Beautiful Questions

Warren Berger and Bill Ringle discuss the power of asking proper questions and how these powerful questions will help you decide, create, connect, and lead better.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top 3 Take-Aways from this Interview

  • Curiosity is a business leader's most important quality.
  • What are the limits of a question?
  • The idea that every business leader should audit the quality of the questions she or he asks.

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

Interview Insights

Read the Show Notes from this Episode

Subscribe to My Quest for the Best on Your Favorite App

Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

WARREN BERGER developed his inquiry skills as a journalist for The New York Times but first declared himself a “questionologist” with the 2014 publication of his best-selling book, A MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION. The book shows that questioning has been the starting point of everything from the cell phone, to Netflix, to the International Red Cross.

In the book, Warren introduces an original framework (the “Why/What If/How” cycle of inquiry) that can be applied to challenges and problems. A More Beautiful Question has been embraced by the NASA space program, the National Science Foundation, companies such as Starbucks, Chanel, Oracle, and Pepsi, as well as by major universities around the country.

Warren has keynoted at the DesignThinkers Conference in Toronto and the International Women’s Conference in Rome. He also regularly visits elementary and high schools around the country, urging teachers to try to encourage more questioning in the classroom.

In the fall of 2018, Warren released a follow-up book on questioning, THE BOOK OF BEAUTIFUL QUESTIONS: The Powerful Questions That Will Help You Decide, Create, Connect, and Lead.

In addition to authoring eight books (including the acclaimed GLIMMER, one of the first books on “design thinking”), Warren has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered, CNN, and NBC’s Today Show, and he contributes regularly to Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, and Psychology Today, where he writes the “Questionologist” column.

MQ4B-Featured-Warren Berger

Contact Info for Warren Berger

Web address: www.amorebeautifulquestion.com

Travels from: Mount Kisco, New York

 Social  Media Links:

Books Authored by the Guest

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

Here is the special offer that Warren referenced during the interview just for our listeners – a special list of:

10 questions to help you be a more effective leader

Thanks so much, Warren! 

207: Charming Cheaters – Interview with Nicole Kelly, M.D

Nicole Kelly M.D., Physician and Author

Nicole Kelly M.D. and Bill Ringle discuss how common and dangerous it is to work with sociopaths, and yet how seldom we think it could happen to one of us.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top Take-Aways from this Interview

  • Not everyone thinks like you do, to think otherwise is dangerous.
  • The differences between a psychopath, a sociopath, and a sexopath.
  • Just because someone is a jerk, it doesn’t mean that they’re a psychopath or a sociopath. Only a licensed medical professional can make that kind of diagnosis.
  • How recognition of certain dangerous characteristics can help in the hiring process, and why it’s so important to document questionable behaviors in new employees.
  • What the empathetic majority can do to better interact with those on the sociopathic spectrum. 

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

Interview Insights

Read the Show Notes from this Episode

Subscribe to My Quest for the Best on Your Favorite App

Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

Nicole Kelly, M.D. is a board-certified physician in Nashville, TN who was victimized by a sociopath – who also turned out to be a sociopathic sex addict or sexopath – who embezzled over $700,000 from her medical practice. Using her ability to explain complicated medical concepts, Dr. Kelly makes clear one of the most important truths of our time: Not everyone thinks like you do—and to assume otherwise is dangerous.

For more about Nicole Kelly M.D., visit her website.

Contact Info for Nicole Kelly, M.D.


Web address: https://www.nicolekellymd.com/

Travels from: Nashville, TN

Social Media Links

Books Authored by the Guest

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

188: Shift Ahead – Interview with Allen Adamson

Co-Founder of Metaforce.co

Allen Adamson talks with Bill Ringle about how small business owners can shift ahead and outsmart the problems that might limit, restrict, or confine the growth of your business.

Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Key Insights from this Interview 
  • The 7 Red Flags that mean a company is becoming less relevant
  • Why it’s so essential to transform your brand into an experience 
  • The story of Central Park and how they divided tasks to assign accountability to the conservancy rangers.
  • The importance of zooming out when it comes to increasing social media engagement.
  • What Jerry Seinfeld can teach us about being more observant

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:44 Allen recounts his experience interviewing with an ad agency immediately following graduation.

3:19 “Marketing is about making your products or service relevant in a rapidly changing world, and if you have no clue what’s going on in the world, you’re not going to be very good at marketing.”

4:11 What Allen reads and listens to in order to stay relevant. “Part of staying current is staying out of your desk.”

4:46 “I always look for clients that are facing challenges that don’t have any easy answer.”

6:39 “If you just really try to watch your customer and observe what’s going on, you’ll be a step ahead.”

7:10 Why you should be more like Jerry Seinfeld.

9:05 “If you just do what you did yesterday, [you’re] going to become less relevant.”

9:50 Why being myopic is the biggest red flag for your business.

10:58 The importance of paying attention to alternatives.

12:09 “A big problem for a business that has become irrelevant is pointing at the other guy.”

14:19 The story of Katz’s Deli and what they did to stay relevant.

15:32 “Sometimes luck matters.”

18:17 The story of the National Geographic Boats. “Instead of just taking a cruise to Alaska, you could take a cruise on National Geographic Boats…you’re living a National Geographic Experience.”

19:14 Why you should make your brand an experience.

20:22 “Everyone can provide a little extra to make their customers’ experience really unexpected. If it’s unexpected people will share it.”

21:11 The importance of zooming out when it comes to increasing social media engagement.

22:26 The story of Central Park and how they divided tasks to assign accountability to the conservancy rangers.

23:37 “If you can get your employees to own the problem or own the business totally with you…you’ll be far better off.”

23:59 “No one ever washes a rental car.”

24:21 The Lightning Round

Expert Bio

Allen Adamson is a noted industry expert in all disciplines of branding. He is Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Metaforce.co and the author of BrandSimple, BrandDigital, The Edge: 50 Tips from Brands That Lead, and Shift Ahead: How the Best Companies Stay Relevant in a Fast Changing World. Prior to Metaforce, Allen was Chairman, North America of Landor Associates, a global branding firm.

More information can be found on the Shift Ahead website: www.shiftaheadbook.com

For more information, visit Allen Adamson’s website.

Contact Info for Allen Adamson

Web address: https://www.metaforce.co/

Travels from: Scarsdale, NY

Phone: (914) 806-6647

Contact:

Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Allen Adamson:

     

187: How Women Rise – Interview with Sally Helgesen

Internationally Acclaimed Speaker, Leadership Consultant, and Bestselling Author

Sally Helgesen and Bill Ringle discuss how women rise in business settings by finding their voice and engaging their power.

Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top takeaways from this interview:

  • Habits are behaviors you can control, so focus on making concrete changes that make a difference in how people treat you.
  • The 4-part change process explained so that it is no longer a mystery or secret. Women and men who lead at work benefit from knowing these steps.
  • By enlisting the help of your colleagues and friends, you benefit from their support, feedback, and upgraded perception of you.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:25 “I was inspired by the nuns of the school I went to.”

3:29 How one particular nun, sister Mary Lawrence

4:52 “These days my work is inspired by the women and increasingly the men in the audiences that I speak to.”

5:59 Why people hire Sally to speak. “Number 1 they’re struggling to develop their women leaders so they can move into much more senior positions…”

7:10 “I think there’s ever more recognition that engagement is key.”

7:39 On the global employee engagement survey. “What they discovered was that not just did people feel engaged or disengaged, they based on whether or not their voice was heard or actively heard by their immediate supervisor.”

8:15 “Engagement is correlated to safety. “

8:31 “What they needed to adopt into their culture was the ability to translate the message that employee engagement and inclusion were important down from the most senior level, where there was big buy-in about it, to the level of supervisory or on-site.”

9:52 “The most powerful way to create a career path that is satisfying, engaging, and rewarding and sustainable over time is to look at what you can control, what lies within your control. What lies within your control is going to be your own habits and behavior.”

10:40 “It’s very common that behaviors that serve you well early in your career can restrict you later on.”

12:50 “Women are often, for very good reasons, reluctant to use the “I” voice when claiming their achievements. Women can be proactively trying to ward off the charge of being ambitious, aggressive, or ‘all about myself’ for things that men would never be tagged as overambitious for saying.”

15:35 How to articulate the exact skills of what you brought to the table, rather than deflecting the credit to avoid looking overambitious.

17:26 The Change template 

17:46 The Change template Step 1 – “Start with one behavior that you can clearly begin to address.”

17:49 The Change template Step 2 – “Enlist other people as allies.”

18:41 The Change template Step  3 – “Let go of self-judgment.”

20:13 “I’ve been doing this for 30 years and I’ve never heard anyone say ‘I work for a perfectionistic boss and I love it.’”

21:40 “Leading your organization and leading it well gives you a platform for being a leader in your industry or sector or in your community as well.”

22:33 “Putting yourself out there and testing your own ultimate capacity for exerting leadership in a variety of venues is always going to be a benefit to you as a leader.”

23:46 Why you shouldn’t expect people to spontaneously acknowledge and reward your contributions, and how this applies to STEM fields.

27:39 How men can become more aware of some of the habits that do get in women’s ways.

29:13 The importance of honest and solicited feedback in an organization.

31:31 The Lightning Round

Expert Bio

Sally Helgesen has been named by Forbes as the world’s premier expert on women’s leadership and by Leadership Excellence magazine as one of the top 50 authorities on leadership in organizations. For the last thirty years, she has helped women leaders around the world to recognize, articulate and act on their greatest strengths and worked with organizations seeking to build more inclusive cultures.

Sally discusses topics from her most recent book, How Women Rise: Break the 12 Habits Holding You Back from Your Next Raise, Promotion, or Job, co-authored with #1 ranked executive coach Marshall Goldsmith, examines the behaviors most likely to get in the way of successful women. It became the top-selling title in its field within a week of publication.

Sally brings a global perspective, having delivered leadership programs for clients around the world including Chevron, Google, IBM, BHP Billiton Melbourne, Mellon Bank, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, The World Bank, The West Point Military Academy, Roschier LLP Helsinki, ING Amsterdam, HP Asia Pacific, The Distributed Education Network Oslo, and the Women’s Leadership Forum of Kuala Lumpur. She has consulted with the United Nations Development Program on building more inclusive country offices in Africa and Asia, led seminars at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and been visiting scholar at Northwestern University, U-Nordic Stockholm, and the Lauriston Institute AU. A contributing editor to Strategy+Business magazine and a member of the International Women’s Forum, Sally Helgesen lives in Chatham NY.

For more information, visit Sally’s website.

Contact Info for Sally Helgesen

Web address: SallyHelgesen.com

Travels From: New York, NY

Follow Sally:

Twitter  linkedin icon

Books by Sally Helgesen

  

186: Rebel Talent – Featured Interview with Francesca Gino

Professor, Harvard Business School

Francesca Gino and Bill Ringle discuss Rebel Talent – what it is and how to cultivate it to achieve greater success in your small business.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • Those with Rebel Talent aren’t just the troublemakers and show-offs. Rebelliousness has real advantages in business.
  • The 5 talents that comprise Rebel Talent: curiosity, perspective, diversity, authenticity, and engagement.
  • How Rebel Talents build on their strengths to create a stronger business

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:10 How Francesca’s dad inspired her to work hard, made sure that she engaged deeply with whatever she was studying, and taught her the importance of travel.

3:08 “I’ve always been fascinated by our human nature.”

3:35 “I began to look at breaking rules in a way that was constructive rather than destructive.”

4:26 How a non-traditional recipe book inspired her to create a non-conventional book of her own. She would later use the chef as a case study.

7:01 “Whenever we do case studies, we usually visit the business and have interviews right there in the city where the business is, but instead of just an interview, they put me to work.”

8:53 “For many people, despite the fact that they spend a lot of time at work, work is not a source of inspiration.”

9:50 “Rebelliousness has a lot of advantages for businesses.”

9:56 “We tend to think about rebels the wrong way.”

10:50 The story of a family who ate at the Michelin starred restaurant and what the chef did to appease the two smallest boys seated at the table.

12:41 “Rebels are those who break rules, whether for the constructiveness of destructiveness of the business.”

13:08 The 8 qualities of a rebel.

14:10 “Being a rebel means really being committed to adopting certain behaviors and talents.”

15:18 Why it’s remarkable for a chef to put on his coat and go out to clean the streets.

15:47 “Leaders who really are rebellious are those who also tend to be contagious because they’re modeling the behaviors for others.”

16:57 What a Tennessee/West Virginia fast food restaurant does to make their employees experts at their stations.

17:15 Why it was important for Francesca’s study to be multi-industry.

18:32 “Revealing yourself and reflecting is all about is focusing on strengths instead, and really finding opportunities to be authentic, and that sometimes means making ourselves vulnerable.”

21:24 “By being rebellious, or by being a curious leader you are showing the right behaviors for others.”

Expert Bio

Francesca Gino is an award-winning researcher and teacher, and a tenured professor at Harvard Business School. Her consulting and speaking clients include Bacardi, Akamai, Disney, Goldman Sachs, Honeywell, Novartis, P&G, and the U.S. Air Force, Army, and Navy. She has been honored as one of the world’s Top 40 Business Professors under 40 and one of the world’s 50 most influential management thinkers. Her work has been featured on CNN and NPR, as well as in the Economist, Financial Times, New York Times, Newsweek, Scientific American, and Psychology Today.

For more information, visit Francesca’s website.

Contact Info for Francesca Gino

Web address: https://www.rebeltalents.org/

Travels from: Cambridge, MA

Phone:(617) 792-1186

Contact:

LinkedIn Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Francesca Gino:

Take the Rebel Test 

185: Getting Grit – Interview with Caroline Miller, MAPP

Owner of Caroline Miller Coaching

Bill Ringle and Caroline Adams Miller discuss the different types of grit that business owners can adopt – good grit, faux grit, poor grit, and stupid grit. Getting the right grit makes all the difference!

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • The main components of grit
  • Why a handshake is integral in making a solid first impression
  • How Caroline became the first person to overcome bulimia and live to tell the story
  • Caroline’s habits that pertain to excellence
  • How your environment affects your behavior
  • How humility helped a business owner learn grit and become great in his role as a leader

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:28 How both Caroline’s Grandmother and the founding principle of the Norwood school in Maryland had an impact on her young professional life.

3:45 Good handshakes show that you’re not afraid of being seen and heard.

5:08 Caroline recounts how Uncle Platt set the world record for the high jump.

6:02 [On overcoming bulimia and telling the story – “I had to begin unpacking how not just for myself, but for other people.”

7:04 “You have to learn to integrate recovery into a life which is part and parcel of how people connect with other people.”

8:49 “There’s no danger of relapse for me. I’m fully recovered.”

9:33 “When we don’t talk about things that are part of our backstory, we connote shame.”

10:07 “I created habits that pertain to excellence.”

11:24 “The fastest way to change your behavior is to change your environment and the quality of the people around you.” 

13:58 How humility plays a role in grit.

16:32 The main components of grit as espoused by Angela Duckworth

17:42 “I don’t think grit is a good quality unless it’s used in the process of pursuing good goals for the right reasons. “

18:45 “There’s a kind of grit that’s really dangerous in the wrong person for the wrong reasons.”

20:05 The story of Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos as an example of bad grit.

22:03 “Bad grit repels people.”

23:17 “The most meaningful goals are also the hardest goals.

24:39 “We have a generation I feel that was brought up to dumb down standards of excellence.”

25:58 How to hire for grit in companies.

27:06 “It’s really important to ask people not just what they have overcome but who else have they helped to overcome.”

28:16 Lightning Round

Expert Bio

Caroline is one of the world’s leading positive psychology experts on Goals & Grit ™. She’s spent more than 30 years helping individuals, leaders, and companies to cultivate grit, one of the top indicators of success. Caroline is the author of six books including Getting Grit (Sounds True 2017), Creating Your Best Life (Sterling 2009), Positively Caroline (Cogent 2013), and My Name is Caroline (Doubleday 1988). Live Happy Magazine named Creating Your Best Life one of the top 10 goal setting books ever published and Getting Grit one of the 10 books that would change your life in 2017. Caroline’s work has been featured in media around the world including BBC World News, The New York Times, The Washington Post, NBC, NPR, and CNN.
Angela Duckworth, the winner of the 2013 MacArthur Genius grant for her research on grit, said of Caroline: “I don’t know anybody who has thought more than [Caroline] about how to apply the scientific research on grit and achievement to our own lives!”
Caroline’s TEDx Talk “The Moments That Make Champions” explores the three things that we can choose to do differently to improve our chances of developing grit. Caroline has worked with clients around the world, including Morgan Stanley, Lululemon, The Wharton School/UPENN, RE/MAX, Booz Allen, Young Presidents’ Organization, Harvard Law School, and Swisse Wellness.
Caroline has a Masters of Applied Positive Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard. She is a top-ranked Masters Swimmer in multiple events, has a black belt in Hapkido and has more than three decades of unbroken recovery from bulimia.

For more information, visit Caroline Miller’s website.

Contact Info for Caroline Miller

Web address: http://www.carolinemiller.com/

Travels from: Washington, DC

Phone: (214) 543-0844

Social Media links:

LinkedIn Facebook YouTube

Resources Mentioned by Caroline Miller:

 

The moments that make champions | Caroline Adams Miller | TEDxGramercy

Chris Clearfield

177: Meltdown: Interview with Chris Clearfield

Founder of System Logic, Co-Author of Meltdown

Bill Ringle and Chris Clearfield discuss the remarkable simplicity that can avert catastrophic business disasters, applicable of organizations of all sizes.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • Complexity is unavoidable, so here is how to think about it in order to manage it successfully.
  • Why it is important to consider how many things have to go RIGHT for your project to succeed.
  • The importance of developing a test and feedback cadence in your work.
  • The myth of the open door policy.
  • How a Toronto hospital cut down unnecessary (and costly) x-rays by changing their protocol

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:41 Chris tells about the time when a physics professor took the time to explain a difficult subject to him, and eventually took him under his wing, and the impact that had on his young mind.

3:56 “When you’re doing science, you don’t always have the answer, and sometimes you get an answer that you don’t expect…the world is not a straightforward and linear place.”

4:46 Chris describes his role working for James Street, and using computers to recognize how much things were worth.

6:58 “Once I understood the trading and I understood the infrastructure and the regulatory stuff and the way everything came together, I switched to a role where I was looking at these bigger questions of risk.”

9:00 How reading about aviation infrastructure, or lack thereof, in Asia allowed Chris to see the complexity inherent in the system.

9:24 “Why do some organizations do a great job of making decisions in really complex environments and managing risk and others do not?”

9:58 “Aviation has figured out how to manage some of these risks prospectively.”

11:00 The genesis of starting his own firm.

11:57 Chris recounts his interest in the BP oil spill. “I was really interested in understanding what happened, and as I dug in more and more…I became fascinated with how the accident happened.”

12:37 “The greatest environmentalist in the last 50 years, might’ve been someone at BP who said, ‘No, this isn’t the right way to do this.’”

13:53 The reason to buy down risk. “There are things happening in the world that [people] don’t quite understand that will affect their business.”

15:18 The importance of preparing for the “knock-on” consequences.

15:58 “It’s not about figuring out what hatch to close, it’s about developing a different perspective and saying: ‘Oh, these things might interact in a way that causes a big problem.’”

16:24 “We wear a seatbelt not because we know the exact kind of accident we’re going to get into, we wear a seatbelt because we want to protect ourselves regardless of the accident.”

17:34 On the post-disaster case study. “I think what that training did was give them the confidence they needed so that they were able to, the next time these things came up, not only deal with it in real time but see the precursors.”

19:12 “In this day and age, there is so much more interconnectedness and complexity.”

20:02 How the Meltdown Quiz can you help you think better about your existing systems. “How many things in this project have to go right for this project to succeed?”

22:28 “We need to add structure to our thinking…we do a lot of work with leaders to help them develop a process to add that structure to their thinking.”

23:05 How to avoid falling into the trap of making the situation more complex than it needs to be.”

26:10 What it means to, as Cal Newport named it, “do deep work.”

27:16 How Chris tracks his deep work hours.

27:53 “I realized that my morning routine with my five-year-old son looked a lot like a crisis.”

30:44 Why you should start your meetings a little bit differently.”

33:18 How doctors in Toronto figured out that asking patients a handful of questions could quickly determine whether or not the patient needed an x-ray.

35:00 “An open door policy is not enough.”

37:25 Chris’s three big takeaways.

Expert Bio

Before starting System Logic, Chris worked as a derivatives trader at a prestigious proprietary trading firm focused on understanding and hedging risk. After years as a trader in New York, Tokyo, and Hong Kong, his role matured from trading to analyzing the financial and regulatory risks inherent in the business of technologically complex high-speed trading to devising policies that mitigate those risks.

He co-authoredMeltdown: Why Our Systems Fail and What We Can Do About It with András Tilcsik, a Toronto business-school professor, to tell us how and why.

He graduated from Harvard College, where he studied physics and biology and is a licensed commercial pilot. He now lives and works in Seattle, WA with his family.

For more information, visit the Rethink Risk website.

Contact Info for Chris Clearfield

Web address: https://www.rethinkrisk.net/

Travels from: Seattle, WA

Phone: 646-543-4250

Contact:

LinkedIn 

Resources Mentioned by Chris Clearfield:

Meltdown Deep Work

Take the Meltdown Quiz! 

Featured Interview with Cal Newport 

 

173: How to Hire A Players: Featured Interview with Eric Herrenkohl

President of Herrenkohl Consulting

Eric Herrenkohl talks with Bill Ringle about how to hire A-Players for Small Business Leaders.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • The fatal flaw of treating hiring as a transactional process
  • Understanding that outstanding performers often need to be managed and supported differently than others
  • Recruiting is a critical leadership skill
  • The magic of involvement leading to buy-in
  • The precaution that C-players may be able to sell themselves better than A-players
  • The best questions to ask to discover the real responsibilities that a candidate undertook
  • How to coach your team to find the best fit for the role without worrying about offending candidates (you’re actually doing them a service, too!)
  • Even very good businesspeople have blind spots that can limit their effectiveness (in hiring as well as in performing)

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

3:04 Eric discusses what it was like meeting Bob Perkins at YoungLife.

3:19 “Great leaders lead other leaders.”

4:01 “If you want to hire and keep great people then you’re going to have to be prepared to invest in a few and have that team be the core that impacts the many.”

6:08 Why “A Players” can sometimes be difficult.

7:48 “I think there’s a difference between disagreeable [people] and people who are behaving poorly because they’re not getting the attention, and not getting treated the way that they need.”

9:25 Why leaders should always have a Plan B when it comes to dealing with toxic A Players.

12:02 “You’ve got to get your whole team involved in recruiting.”

14:25 What it means to have an A Player scorecard, and what the process means for team buy-in of new recruits.

14:51 How asking questions can create a whole new level of employee engagement.

16:23 “We get better at things that we practice.”

18:03 Tested tips and tricks for putting interviewees at ease before and during an interview.

18:08 “The most important interview question is the follow-up question.”

20:54 “What you’re doing as an interviewer is working to ensure a good mutual fit: good for the company, and good for the person.”

22:45 “There are not that many great leaders out there, so if you invest in your own ability as a leader, if you get better as a leader, then you’ll attract other leaders.”

23:25 “I’m committed to finding and hiring the best people that I can.”

23:57 What inspired Eric to write the book How to Hire A-Players.

26:54 “Over the last 6 months the talent markets have gotten hotter, making it harder to find and hire the best.”

27:35 What Eric does to stay productive and on track. 

Expert Bio

Eric Herrenkohl is the President of Herrenkohl Consulting, a consulting and retained executive search firm that he founded in 2002. He works as an advisor to CEOs on building superior leadership teams.

Eric is the author of the upcoming book Crowbar: Pry away top talent, surround yourself with the right leaders, and create the team your customers demand.

His previous book How to Hire A-Players is an Amazon bestseller published by Wiley that is described as one of the top 10 recruiting books of all time by Recruiter.com.

Business Week, Fox News, NBC News, the Toronto Globe and Mail, the Philadelphia Business Journal, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Inc.com, Careerbuilder.com, MSNBC.com, Monster.com, and the LinkedIn Talent Blog have all featured his work.

Eric holds a master’s degree from Covenant Seminary in St. Louis and an undergraduate degree in economics and history from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He and his wife and four children live in the Philadelphia area.

For more information, visit Eric Herrenkohl’s website.

Contact Info for Eric Herrenkohl

Web address: http://www.herrenkohl.com/

Travels from: Wynnewood, PA

Phone: (610) 742-8196

Connect on Social Media

LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube

Resources Mentioned by Eric Herrenkohl:

Bob Perkins – WRTI

169: The One Percent Edge – Interview with Susan Solovic

Entrepreneur and New York Times Bestselling Author

Susan Solovic and Bill Ringle discussed how business leaders can find and exploit the one percent edge to stay relevant to their markets and outpace the competition on My Quest for the Best.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • How early jobs in the family funeral home and waitressing motivated her to seek new opportunities and environments.
  • Secrets to effective business networking that you can use to stand out, get noticed, and gain business.
  • A way to gauge progress in building your brand online.
  • An example of the importance in cutting the dead weight in your organization.
  • The importance of a “no sacred cows” principle in your leadership.
  • Why the National Court Reporters Association is one of Susan’s favorite examples of re-envisioning your organization’s mission in the face of technology trends.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:10 How a negative experience working at a steakhouse encouraged Susan to think about making money differently.

3:51 Susan recounts how her mom’s entrepreneurial drive inspired her to become one too.

4:37 “If you have the guts to go out and do it on your own, go out and do it on your own.”

5:15 [On having the courage to leave the corporate world] – “You take the step and say I’m going to give this a try, and if it doesn’t work out, it doesn’t work out.”

5:55 The benefits of knowing your core competencies.

7:15 The steps Susan took to deal with the challenge of an assumed learning disability in middle school.

8:04 “Believe in yourself, know what you can do. No one should label you.”

9:06 How a lack of knowledge about how to run an internet company didn’t stop Susan from buying SBTV.com. The company would become one of the Hot Tech 100 companies of the year.

10:28 “The biggest thing that we did to build the business was getting collaboration.”

11:28 [On Networking] – “It’s not about selling, it’s about building that trust and rapport.”

13:29 Marketing used to be the message going out to consumers, and now it’s a two way street.

15:05 “We have so much access to data.”

16:40 Susan explains the significance of being authentic and connecting with your followers online.

17:22 How collaboration with other websites can bring more traffic to your website.

19:08 [The One Percent Edge] – “It’s about looking at your business on a regular basis…and about continuing to evolve on a regular basis.”

20:30 “You can”t be on the status quo, you’ve got to be on the status grow.”

20:49 The dangers of being married to our business operations.

22:40 “If you’re not willing to open up, I can’t help you.”

24:05 Susan describes the process of writing the book.

25:56 The trend of people wanting to talk about what’s happening, and being more accessible to having new conversations.

Expert Bio

Susan Solovic is an award winning entrepreneur, New York Times bestselling author, media personality, keynote speaker and attorney. Her new book is The One Percent Edge: Small Changes That Guarantee Relevance and Build Sustainable Success. Solovic is also the host of The One Percent Edge podcast.

For more information, visit Susan Solovic’s Website.

Contact Info for Susan Solovic

Web address: http://www.susansolovic.com/ 

Travels from: Jupiter, FL

Phone: (631) 539-4558

Contact:

  

Resources Mentioned by Susan Solovic:

 

 

 

166: The Everyday Joy of ‘I Get To’ – Featured Interview with Ted Larkins

Owner of The Get To Principle, LLC

Ted Larkins talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about how to adopt a “get to” mindset and become more peaceful, productive, and satisfied in your everyday life.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The significance of the Dalai Lama’s advice that the purpose of life is to find happiness.
  • What happens when you start thinking in terms of “I get to” instead of “I have to.”
  • What an Indian man who lived in a 10 x 10 home with his wife and four children taught Ted about happiness.
  • What happened when a successful Tampa real estate agent started applying the “Get To” principles.
  • What matters to celebrities like Jon Bon Jovi when it comes to happiness.
  • Ted’s 15 minute daily morning practice that strengthens his mindset and creates a blueprint for success.

 

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:49 How Ted’s parents passed onto him the ethic of “getting out and doing things.”

2:58 [Paraphrasing the Dalai Lama] – “The purpose of life, I believe, is to find happiness.”

3:28 “When you make the choice to be happy, it’s really powerful.”

4:25 The benefits of smiling more often.

5:30 The “30 second rule” of changing your mindset.

5:49 [The Get To Mantra] – “You say, ‘I get to do this,’ you smile, and then you do what you’re going to do.’”

7:08 The essential difference in mindset between “I have to” and “I get to.”

10:15 Why the kind of happiness Ted refers to isn’t a “Polyanna” kind of happiness.

13:08 How Ted’s experiences traveling through India helped him shape his worldview.

14:59 “When I’m deliberate about saying ‘I get to do this,’ the more in control I am of my life.”

15:49 “We all have our level of frustration and things like that, but we do have the choice.”

17:28 Ted recounts his work with Bon Jovi, and what it was like to get through the trust barrier.

18:49 “We’re born and then we die, and in between we get to do this thing called life.”

20:09 The point of the mindful movement.

21:43 [Ted describes his 3 month executive coaching process.] – “It helps take people from this mundane [mindset] or just going through the motions and brings them up to really experiencing life.”

22:30 Case study of a Florida business man who just wasn’t getting the most out of life.

23:45 [On writing Get To Be Happy] – “I had the best time.”

25:24 “I learned that just being focused and dedicated to something for 30 minutes a day, you can get a lot done.”

28:15 Ted’s daily exercise for staying happy and productive.

Expert Bio

Ted Larkins is an author, speaker, accomplished business executive and coach on happiness. Through his book and keynote talks, he shares the powerful Get To Principle, the ability to say “I Get To” as opposed to “I have to”. Ted also co-developed a leading entertainment licensing company in Tokyo, representing major movie studios that included Paramount Pictures, Sony Pictures, and 20th Century Fox. He’s worked on projects with Jon Bon Jovi, Jack Nicklaus, Mariah Carey, and many other artists. He is former Senior Vice President of the North American division of CPLG, one of the world’s leading entertainment, sport and brand licensing agencies. He is on the board of directors of the Licensing Industry Merchandise Association (LIMA), co-chairing the charity committee and sitting on the executive committee. He is a guest lecturer for the UCLAx Entertainment Studies and Performing Arts program.
Over a year and a half period, during his daily 4 hour train commute to work in Hollywood, he wrote the book, “Get To Be Happy: Stories and Secrets On Loving the Sh*t Out of Life. Ted lives with his wife of 22 years and their two children in Southern California.

For more information, visit Ted Larkins’ Website

Contact Info for Ted Larkins

Web address: http://www.tedlarkins.com

Travels from: Costa Meza, CA

Phone: (818) 261-8262

Contact:

LinkedIn  Twitter 

Resources Mentioned by Ted Larkins:

 

160: Thinking Right Side Up – Featured Interview with David Fields

Founder of Ascendant Consulting

David Fields talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about how connecting with clients means recognizing that when it comes to consulting, it’s not about you.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • Why Emotional Connection plays such an important role in client relationships
  • How Making mistakes can make you more valuable to your clients
  • What it means to think “right side up.”
  • Why being confident will get you more consulting clients
  • The reason clients have difficulty trusting new approaches

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

00:59 Fields discusses his fanatical love of both chocolate and hockey.

1:28 “I happen to love what I do, like many of us who are entrepreneurs. I just thrive on the business.”

2:36 Fields recalls a story from his childhood about a word class mathematician who taught him how to use unit blocks in kindergarten. “This amazing mathematician would ride his bike to teach kids in kindergarten.”

3:00 “I just think that the idea of teaching other people and giving your knowledge, not at your level, but at their level…you meet people where they are and help them.”

3:56 [On his first job(s)] “I’m a numbers person, and I went into marketing research and learned a lot of great skills there.”

4:07 “My first boss once told me, ‘David our job isn’t to say that the glass is half empty or the glass is half full but to say there is 6oz of water in a 12 oz glass.”

4:33 “Life is so much more than numbers, and in fact, numbers aren’t the answer.”

5:13 Fields tells about his time working as an interviewer for a dating service.

6:05 “If you go back 30 years, the idea of meeting someone through a service, there’s a lot of stigma attached.”

6:30 “It wasn’t the matching that got people there, it was the emotional journey.”

7:00 Fields recounts the time leading up to spinning off from his original company to start a new consulting company with his partner Jim.

7:40 [On the fate of the early venture] – “That worked incredibly well for about 4 weeks.”

8:05 “Jim was the business development guy. I was the backroom engine guy. I was coming up with models and smart solutions to client problems.”

8:19 “I was left without a partner, without clients, and without the skill set to develop clients.”

8:37 “My first year running Ascendant was a disaster.”

8:59 “Once you have some success and you’re smart enough to get help, then it gets easier.”

9:25 “Unless you have failed, you can’t show that you have the resilience and the ability to get up.”

9:43 “I wouldn’t go out of my way to try to make mistakes, but if you try to avoid them, that’s where trouble sets in.”

10:25 [On Org Design] – “No design is ever perfect out of the gate.”

10:33 “We’re better off putting it in place, getting it darn close, and then refining it. I don’t worry about the mistakes, I worry about creating high quality.”

11:15 [On thinking right side up] – “Consulting is not about you, it’s about them.”

11:35 [On what his experiences working in a shoe store taught him] – “It doesn’t matter what it looked like to you…it mattered what it felt like to them. It wasn’t about my shoes it was about their feet.”

11:56 “If there’s one thing to take away from our discussion, I would say take that away. It’s not about you, it’s about them.”

12:26 “Most of the time we start something we think about ourselves, and we have to push ourselves to think about our clients.”

12:50 “Take the first line of the e-mail and make it about the client, not about you.”

13:08 “In everything you do: every e-mail you write, every presentation you give, think to yourself, ‘How do I make this about them, not me.”

13:32 “Confidence is extremely important.”

13:59 “One of the ironies is that people look inside for their confidence. They’ve been taught by self-help gurus that there is some inner core and they have to believe in themselves, and I think that’s absolutely nonsense.”

14:16 “Stop looking at yourself. If your prospect or client believes you have value, then you have value.”

14:38 “The lack of self-confidence comes from thinking too much about yourself.”

16:20 [On teaching new consultants why they don’t need certifications] – “If a client came to you with this problem, could you give them a solution that will solve the problem? If the answer is yes, then why do you need a certification?”

17:20 “A lot of consultants want to start with: ‘Here’s what I’m good at. Here’s what I know. Let me try to sell what I know.” 

17:30 It doesn’t matter what you know or what you’re good at, all that matters is what the market wants.

17:38 “Learn something different. Learn what the market wants.”

18:14 “It’s not that we shouldn’t study and learn. We absolutely should, we should go where the market is and pick up skills.”

18:42 [What Field learned from consumer products] – “You need a breakthrough product and you need to be differentiated.”

19:05 “Clients aren’t looking for different. Clients aren’t looking for breakthrough. Clients are looking for solved. They’re looking for a solution that’s reliable and credible.”

19:25 “Every single client, every single executive, has had at least one experience, and probably multiple experiences, with having hired a third party and that third party didn’t deliver.”

19:59 [On client trust] – “They want the thing that’s worked 30 times.”

20:03 “Don’t worry about what makes you different, worry about what makes you credible and reliable.”

20:25 How Fields met Keith Ferrazzi

22:00 “If we’re trying to appear reliable and we’re trying to appear credible, the clients need some proof.”

22:21 “There’s social proof like crazy these days.”

22:41 Clients are looking for how you interact with them, and they’re also looking for other kinds of social proof.

23:15 “The advantage of having a marquee client is that you can put them on the marquee and people will say ‘Wow!’”

24:15 “Whether you’re a sole [consultant] or boutique, you’re always trying to balance command.”

24:25 “I would never advise building capacity ahead of demand.”

24:50 Not everyone is cut out to be a rainmaker.

25:53 “Impact is step 2, before you get visibility.”

26:55 “People who are going to take your ideas and not call you, were never going to call you anyway.”

27:26 “What you do is gain the people who were smart enough to realize that there’s one level, which is understanding a concept, there’s another level which is implementing it without making as many mistakes. And then there’s another level, which is implementing it with feedback and coaching and guidance along the way, and that’s going to make the entire process faster.”

29:06 “I think most people know that coaching is a good thing.”

29:25 “You have to make a decision that you’re willing to invest in your business.”

29:45 “Are you willing to learn and change?”

29:55 Good coaches will often make you do something different, something uncomfortable.

30:00 “And if you want to achieve something different, you’re going to have to change something and probably something that feels uncomfortable.”

31:17 [On the early years of Ascendant] – “It never occurred to me to do hourly work, that’s not how I grew up.”

32:25 Fields tips for staying on track and focused.

32:42 “I’m not naturally on track. I’m intellectually spastic.”

32:54 “If something’s not your skill set, you get rid of it and you have somebody whose skill set it is take care of it.”

35:00 “I am here to help consultants succeed.”

36:35 “We can always learn and we can always improve.”

David Field’s Bio

David A. Fields works with boutique consulting firms and individual consultants across the globe that are eager to accelerate growth, increase profit and create lucrative, lifestyle-friendly practices. He has guided consultancies ranging from one-person startups to the consulting divisions of some of the world’s largest companies.

David still advises corporate clients too. After climbing the ranks to become a partner at a prestigious consulting firm in Connecticut, David co-founded Ascendant Consulting, where he has attracted clients such as Abbott Laboratories, Church & Dwight, FMC, Warner Home Video, and many others.

David’s books include Amazon’s highest-rated book on the business of consulting released in the past 20 years: The Irresistible Consultant’s Guide to Winning Clients.

He also leads the Ascendant Consortium, a unique, “general contractor” model in which David acts as both a client and consultant on the same project. The consortium now includes more than 150 consultants whose clients are a Who’s Who of the global business world. The Ascendant Consortium was a breakthrough for David professionally, and in this model high-dollar, high-margin projects are the norm.

David received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from Carnegie Mellon. (Go plaid!) He is a hockey fanatic and eats egregious amounts of chocolate.

For more information, visit David Field’s website.

Contact Info for David Fields

Web address: http://davidafields.com

Travels from: Ridgefield, CT

Phone: (203) 438-7236

Contact:

LinkedIn YouTube Twitter

Resources Mentioned by David Fields:

   

David Livermore photo

158: Overcoming Diversity Fatigue – Featured Interview with David Livermore

Cultural Intelligence Thought Leader and Author

David Livermore talks with Bill Ringle about how awareness of values diversity drives business value.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The importance of taking inventory of your company culture.
  • How to recognize and overcome “diversity fatigue.”
  • The role of diversity metrics in business.
  • The key ingredient of shared objectives.
  • What Jeff Bezos missed with his “empty chair” technique

Expert Bio

David Livermore is a thought leader in cultural intelligence (CQ) and global leadership and the author of ten books on cultural intelligence and global leadership. His book,  Leading with Cultural Intelligence, was named a best-seller in business by The Washington Post. He’s president and partner at the Cultural Intelligence Center in East Lansing, Michigan and a visiting research fellow at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Prior to leading the Cultural Intelligence Center, Dave spent 20 years in leadership positions with a variety of non-profit organizations around the world and taught in universities. He’s a frequent speaker and adviser to leaders in Fortune 500’s, non-profits, and governments and has worked in more than 100 countries across the Americas, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Europe.

Dave has authored several other books, including the award-winning titles, Serving With Eyes Wide Open and Cultural Intelligence: Improving your CQ to Engage our Multicultural World (Baker Publ.).

Dave loves to take research and make it accessible to practitioners. He has been interviewed and referenced by major news sources such as Atlantic Monthly, CBS News, The Christian Post, Christian Science Monitor, The Economist, Forbes, NBC, The New York Times, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post.

For more information, visit David’s website.

Contact Info for David Livermore

Web address: http://www.davidlivermore.com

Travels from: Holt, MI

Phone: (512) 519-9875

Contact:

LinkedIn Facebook Twitter RSS

Resources Mentioned by David Livermore:

Janice Presser

147: Team Well and Prosper – Featured Interview with Dr. Janice Presser

Behavioral Scientist and CEO of The Gabriel Institute

Dr. Janice Presser talks with Bill Ringle about Teamability®, and reveals some essential tips and tricks for team success on My Quest for the Best.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The connection between employee satisfaction and engagement, and meaningful work
  • The 4 elements of teaming that are essential for team chemistry and success
  • New methods for testing new hires for collaborative work
  • The crucial differences in showing that appreciation and respect for the people on your team
  • The formula for understanding team characteristics and successful teamwork

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:09 [On Presser’s early life experiences“My earliest questions didn’t have answers, I had to spend a lot of time seeking them out myself.”

2:00 “Everything is about people interacting with other people. And why is it sometimes that you have this amazing feeling that you’re yourself but you’re like the best you that you ever are when you’re doing it with these people?”

3:00 Teaming up with Dr. Jack Gerber.

4:15 [On being a female entrepreneur during the women’s movement] “We were on a mission to change the world.”

5:15 [On the power of teams] – “Everyone else did all those other things that I didn’t do very well. I was great at coming up with ideas, but you have to have people who will lead the execution, or who make sure the details get followed up on, or the person who handles the emergency as it happens.”

5:53 “It was so gratifying, not just because it was my mission in life, but that I also could do it with people who felt that the way in which they were contributing to this thing that was bigger than any of us, that that was meaningful to them, and that’s a very contagious feeling. That feeling that what you’re doing is meaningful and important.”

7:36 “Teaming is a science. Great teamwork, that great team chemistry that we want, there’s an operating system for it.”

7:55 [On incorporating the formula for teaming] – “Whether you’re a startup or a huge multinational, it doesn’t matter, we all start new things at different times.”

8:20 [One of the most important question to ask about people] – “How do they really make meaningful contributions to something bigger than themselves?

9:18 Two more important points to think about when evaluating the people on your team and their level of contribution.

10:17 “It’s not that people are good or bad or indifferent, it’s that everyone has an optimal place that they’re going to make a better contribution from the standpoint of the team, but also do it in a way that’s fun for them.”

10:50 Presser uses herself as an example to describe teaming characteristics.

14:34 “If you want to understand anything about someone, all of the ways that existed prior to tenability are some variation of directly, or indirectly, asking someone what they’re like.”

15:26 “It’s not good for business to not have their needs met, and it’s not great for people to be in a job that isn’t going to be satisfying to them in at least some way, and to have that feeling of at least doing something productive.”

16:43 The characteristics which don’t factor into Teamability.

17:18 “If you ask someone how good they are at something, very often you’ll get something completely incorrect, because people do not know what they do not know.”

18:01 [On objective evaluation] – “The fact is, evaluating yourself you use yourself as the reference point.”

19:57 [On hiring for skill based work] – “Think about what’s important, what is truly important, in this job. If it’s something like lifting boxes, then ask someone to lift the weight of a typical package, or the heaviest package, that has to go on. That’s a pretty good test. But if the test is: Will they smile at the person they’re delivering it to? Do they have to deal with any regulators on the road? Ask yourself, ‘To be successful at this job, how does this person need to interact with other people?’”

21:46 How teaming characteristics affect personal interactions.

21:52 “Rethinking what we expect of people in terms of personal interactions or longer term relationship is really key, because, you know, why do people leave jobs? Because they don’t like the boss or the people they’re working with. Most people don’t leave because, well, they don’t like the actual task that they do.”

22:33 How Presser’s clients use her expertise on Teamability.

24:54 The 4 components used for the Teamability Playbook.

25:30 [Basis 1 – Well fit] – “Give people actual work, tasks, day to day things to do that align with the way in which they contribute. They will be happier and so will you.”

25:46 [Basis 2 – Team Fit] – “Make sure every person on the team is meeting on of those key needs that that team has.”

26:34 [Basis 3 – Team Chemistry] – “If we try to do everything we don’t succeed very well and we feel like we’re being stretched in too many directions. When we find our role partner…then one person starts, and the other person finishes.”

27:55 [Basis 4 – Role Respect] – “Role is the way you make that contribution, and role respect is the way that a manager can manage, communicate, respect, appreciate any other person on the team in a way that aligns with the way in which they make their contributions.”

31:00 How to appreciate the people on your team in the role that they play.

33:41 “If you want to have better teaming, make it real, make it visible. Acknowledge people for the parts in which they contribute. And, by the way, if you start to do this at work, you will start to do this in your personal life.”

34:13 How growing up in your family structure creates the foundation for your views of teaming.

34:48 “If you want to leave a legacy, leave a legacy of great teaming.”

35:00 “When you make the workplace a better place to work, you make the world a better place to live.”

37:32 “If you are wanting a successful company, or division, or team, or anything, if it’s successful you are very likely doing something right, wouldn’t you like to know what it is so you don’t have to go through the aggravation of ‘Why did this work so perfectly last time and now it doesn’t?’”

39:56 “When you think of any sport team, you tend to think of the players that are on the field, but for every player on the field, how many people are there supporting them?”

Expert Bio

Dr. Janice Presser is CEO of The Gabriel Institute, a behavioral scientist, and architect of the technology that powers Teamability®. She has studied team interaction in academic, clinical, and business settings for over 40 years, and has applied her expertise in the areas of HR metrics and measurements, workforce planning, and the future or work. Dr. Presser has authored seven books, most recently, Timing Isn’t Everything. Teaming Is (July 2017). In an era of digital disruption and transformational change, Dr. Presser’s integrated technology and management methods create collaborative culture, generate extraordinary business results, and open new paths to meaningful work and organizational health.

 

For more information, visit Janice’s website and blog.

Contact Info for Dr. Janice Presser

Web address: http://www.thegabrielinstitute.com

Travels from: Philadelphia, PA

Phone: (215)-825-2500

Contact:

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Resources Mentioned by Dr. Janice Presser:

  

anita_campbell

145: Following Small Business Trends – Featured Interview with Anita Campbell

Founder and CEO, Anita Campbell Associates Ltd.

Anita Campbell talks to Bill Ringle about the nuggets of advice that small business owners need to succeed in the midst of their busy schedule.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How she made the successful transition from the corporate world to being a successful entrepreneur.
  • What other entrepreneurs want from learning materials and networking.
  • Four trends that are driven by different forces and are shaping what tools and strategies entrepreneurs use to grow.

 

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:38 Campbell’s journey from corporate attorney to business decision-maker and consultant to founder of Small Business Trends.

4:07 [On curating content in the web’s earlier days] – “We would follow our website statistics and see which articles were most popular. We would see which articles were getting linked to by others, just which ones were getting the attention, and from there we were able to do more of the things that were really popular.”

5:08 [On reacting to customer feedback] – “Like any magazine we get communications from readers and we act on that.”

5:47 The different types of content, personalities, and media Campbell hosts on her podcast.

6:37 “We like an eclectic mix of good information whether it’s on technology, or human resources, management, marketing, whatever it is, as long as it’s of interest to small businesses.”

7:08 “People are interested in actionable kinds of advice rather than long essays that may be real thought pieces, I mean there’s a place for those, but we need to have a steady diet of good actionable tips.”

7:52 “A lot of our advice applies whether you are a sole proprietor, or if you have a staff of 5,10, 50 people working in the business. We just react to ‘What do people say is the most important to them?’”

8:22 How tracking private email shares can indicate the success of published content.

9:25 [On SBT’s most popular content] “Our perennial favorites are the startup failure statistics, they get quoted a lot…People are just trying to make sure that they don’t become a statistic.”

10:10 [On SBT’s popular 1 page marketing plan] “People are looking for something that doesn’t overwhelm them, and when you think about your typical small business owner – well think about yourself, I think about myself – I have so many things coming at me in a day’s time I don’t have big blocks of time to sit down and write a lengthy marketing plan.”

11:15 “We want help. We look for aids and assistance. But it’s gotta be stuff that we can deal with quickly, because we don’t have a lot of time.”

12:25 [On the inspiration for Visual Marketing] “We’re very busy, our brains our fried from all of the other things we have to worry about and get done in a day. Even if we have some outside marketing help, we’re rolling up our sleeves and helping our outside marketing agency or consultant. And we have to think up new ideas and that’s very tough.”

12:50 Campbell’s technique for quick idea formulation.

13:20 [What the book is about] “It’s 99 examples that you can use of low-cost creative marketing to pull ideas and hopefully trigger some ideas of something you can apply in your own business.”

13:55 “With the explosion of blogs today, so many small business, and in particular those that sell B2B to other small business, have started their own blogs. And while getting information and advice was useful, one thing that so many of them were looking for is a way to also get visibility for their own blog, for their own thoughts, and to be able to share with the world what they are doing.”

14:24 “One of the very powerful things that we learned was that we could become more popular if we helped our readers become better known.”

15:01 “While we want to give you information and resources as a reader, we know that it’s also key for you as a small business owner – perhaps you’re a consultant, account, or some sort of professional, head of your own marketing agency – you need to establish your own thought leadership, and to be able to get out there and let the world know what you’re doing.”

16:00 The story of BIzSugar.com and what it does for small business owners.

17:57 [On BizSugar’s content] – “We keep the site very focused on small business, we don’t allow anything off topic in there. If you are really into sports or entertainment, there are plenty of sites for that. BizSugar is not one of them. And it’s because we keep it so focused that it’s a useful resource.”

19:35 “We’re open and we relish serving even the smallest of small business, or even if you think your business is a mundane kind of business, there’s probably a place for it to be mentioned in some way. We always look for the unique, what’s special about a business. I think every business has something special – I don’t care how small, where you’re located, there’s something special in your business, and if we can spot that, we love to talk about it.”

20:45 On how Small Business Trends is able to track changes and trends in the market, especially with emerging technology. 

Expert Bio

Anita Campbell is a small business expert who serves as CEO of Anita Campbell Associates Ltd, a woman-owned consulting firm helping companies and organizations reach the small business market. Prior to starting her own businesses in 2001, Anita held a variety of senior executive positions in the corporate world, including Senior Vice President of Bell & Howell Publishing Services, culminating in the role of CEO of an information technology subsidiary of Bell & Howell.

As Publisher of several online media properties and syndicated content, Anita reaches over 1 million small business owners and entrepreneurs annually. She is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Small Business Trends, an award-winning online publication, and hosts Small Business Trends Radio, where she interviews other small business experts.

Anita is a prolific writer and a regular speaker at small business, marketing and technology events. Her new book, Visual Marketing, was published in September, 2011. In addition to her own publications, her articles and columns have been published at places such as Inc Technology, OPEN Forum, and Success Magazine. Her expertise is often sought by the media, and she is quoted in The New York TimesFortuneUSA Today, and many other outlets.

For more information, visit Anita’s website.

Contact Info for Anita Campbell

Business Phone: 330-242-1893

Web address: AnitaCampbell.com

Web address: SmallBizTrends.com

Travels From: Cleveland, OH

Follow Anita:

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Books by Anita Campbell

Randy Pennington photo

138: The Most Significant Trait of a Company Culture – Featured Interview with Randy Pennington

Award-winning Author and Consultant

Randy Pennington talks with Bill Ringle about how to make company culture work to increase productivity and morale.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The importance of company culture in attracting talent.
  • The risks of not changing fast enough as a team or company.
  • The 6 choices that need to be made regarding how a culture develops.
  • The single most significant trait of a company culture.
  • How structure and process are the building blocks of habits.
  • The executive team that rolled out training to emphasize its importance to the company.

Expert Bio

Randy Pennington helps leaders achieve positive results in a world of accelerating change an disruption. He is a twenty-five year business performance veteran, award-winning author, and consultant who has worked with many of this country’s best-known organizations including: Alabama Power Company, Motorola, LSG Sky Chefs, SmithBucklin, Hyatt Hotels and Resorts, Texas A&M University, Marathon Oil, Sprint, Huntsman Chemical, State Farm Insurance, and DFW Airport in addition to government agencies at the local, state, and national level. Additionally, he serves as an adjunct instructor in the Cox Business Leadership Center at Southern Methodist University.

Pennington is the author of three books: Results Rule!, which received the 2007 Best Books Award from USA Book News, and On My Honor, I Will, which Ross Perot described as having “cracked the code of great leadership.” His third book, Make Change Work, received the 2013 Best Books Award for general business from USA Book News.

Randy’s background is a unique blend of line, staff, and consulting experiences ranging from hourly employee to senior management. He holds a Bachelors and Masters Degree in Psychology and completed Postgraduate work in Organization Administration and Management. He is a past Chairman of the Board for the American Heart Association, Texas Affiliate, and a founding member of the Texas Council on Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke. Randy has been inducted into the Speakers Hall of Fame by the National Speakers Association and is past Chairman for the NSA Foundation.

For more information, visit Randy’s website.

Contact Info for Randy Pennington

Web address: http://www.penningtongroup.com/

Travels from: Addison, TX

Contact:
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Resources Mentioned by Randy Pennington:

   

Julie Williamson

137: Purpose More, Transform Less – Featured Interview with Julie Williamson

Vice President of Strategy & Research for Karrikins Group

Julie Williamson talks with Bill Ringle about overcoming the obstacles to growth so you can create a company that matters to its employees, customers, and the larger community.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The connection between an unclear purpose and growth stagnation.
  • How when it comes to transformation, less is almost always better.
  • An example of a construction company transformation based on elevating its business relationships
  • A sure sign that technology is not being deployed effectively
  • A breakdown of how investing in customers, employees, and your community reflects both an abundance mentality and measurable ROI.

Expert Bio

Julie Williamson has worked with major corporations, helping them set and execute on strategy and transformation. She has also worked with smaller organizations (for-profit, non-profit, and government) to drive success as they seek to grow their revenue and their impact their communities.

Julie is an educator with experience at the undergraduate and graduate level, teaching organizational strategy, behavior, and change. Her students learn to connect theoretical concepts to real-world applications.

Her work with Peter Sheahan on the book MATTER: Create more value, move beyond the competition, and become the obvious choice highlights Julie’s commitment to shifting the focus of leaders to optimum levels.

For more information, visit Karrikin’s Group website.

Contact Info for Julie Williamson

Web address: http://www.karrikinsgroup.com

Travels from: Denver, CO

Contact:

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2 3

Resources Mentioned by Julie Williamson:

Victor-Hwang

124: Designing Innovative Ecosystems – Featured Interview with Victor Hwang

CEO/Co-Founder of T2 Venture Capital

Victor Hwang talks to Bill Ringle about Silicon Valley, breakthrough technologies, and the nature of the innovative ecosystem.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • Why some places thrive and others struggle with comparable levels of the talent pool and opportunity.
  • What is a trust network and why it matters.
  • The surprising key to an innovative ecosystem
  • A simple belief to cultivate that makes an ecosystem sustainable

Expert Bio

Victor Hwang is CEO, co-founder and Managing Director of T2 Venture Capital, a Silicon Valley venture firm that builds startup companies and the ecosystems that grow them. T2VC mentors and invests in innovative companies with breakthrough technologies. But unlike any other firm of its kind, T2VC also leverages the practical knowhow of company-building to design innovation ecosystems around the world. This expertise includes capital formation, innovation policy, and entrepreneurial development for partners such as the World Bank, USAID, and numerous governments and corporations.

Victor is primary co-author of the book The Rainforest: The Secret to Building the Next Silicon Valley (Regenwald, 2012), which explains how society can foster innovative economies.  The book has been praised as “an insightful, forward-thinking assessment of what makes Silicon Valley tick” (Kirkus Reviews) and “a detailed analysis of the power of environment on startup success” (Forbes).  Victor is author of the follow-up book, The Rainforest Blueprint: How to Design Your Own Silicon Valley (Regenwald, 2013), a short, full-color, lively do-it-yourself guide to catalyze innovation in any company, organization, or region. Victor is also a contributing columnist to Forbes magazine, where he authors the blog Riffs from the Rainforest. He has also written for The Wall Street Journal, TechCrunch, and Entrepreneur.

Victor graduated from Harvard University with an A.B. with Honors, studying Government plus additional studies in Computer Science, Computer Architecture, and Operating Systems Design. He graduated from the Law School of the University of Chicago with a J.D. He was appointed as a Law Clerk in the General Counsel’s office of the U.S. Agency for International Development in 1997 and served in national politics from 1995 to 1997.

For more information, visit Victor’s website.

Contact Info for Victor Hwang

Web address: Innovation Rainforest

Travels From: Silicon Valley, CA

Follow Victor:
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Books by Victor Hwang:

The Rainforest 

Michael Stanier

122: Great Work vs. Good Work – Featured Interview with Michael Bungay Stanier

Author, Speaker, and Senior Partner of Box of Crayons

Michael Bungay Stanier talks with Bill Ringle about practical ways to do more great work instead of only good work.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The importance of structuring training that includes objectives for employee self-sufficiency
  • Understand what it means to great work vs. good work
  • Criteria for asking great questions
  • What effective coaching most resembles
  • How to overcome “hacking your own productivity systems”
  • When it makes sense NOT to coach as a manager

Expert Bio

Michael Bungay Stanier is the Senior Partner of Box of Crayons, a company that helps organizations do less Good Work and more Great Work. On the way to founding Box of Crayons ten years ago, Michael lived in Australia, England, the US and now Canada. As an innovation expert he helped invent new products and services, and as a change management consultant he supported companies as they evolved.

He’s written a number of books, the best known of which are Do More Great Work and the philanthropic project End Malaria; created a series of short internet videos, such as The Eight Irresistible Principles of Fun; and designed a wide range of training programs that are being used around the world.

He was the first Canadian Coach of the Year and a Rhodes Scholar. An internationally acclaimed professional keynote speaker, Michael is a popular speaker at business and coaching conferences around the world, including International Coaching Federation conferences, the OD Network, the International Association of Facilitators, CSTD and SHRM. He’s also Thinker in Residence at Knowledge Blocks, a resource for readers of business books. He’s been the Creativity Coach for David Allen’s Getting Things Done online community.

For more information, visit Michael’s website.

Contact Info for Michael Bungay Stanier

Business Phone: 416-532-1322

Web address: BoxofCrayons.biz

Travels From: Toronto, Canada

Follow Michael:

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Books by Michael Bungay Stanier

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Andrea Waltz and Richard Fenton

119: Burning Your Ships – Featured Interview with Andrea Waltz and Richard Fenton

Co-Founders of Courage Crafters and Bestselling Authors

Courage Crafters co-founders Andrea Waltz and Richard Fenton talk to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about learning to love the word “no.”

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How they started their business by “burning their ship”
  • A clever approach to expanding business within a client company
  • Understanding that each of us has a “relationship” with the word “no”
  • When it makes sense to celebrate a “no” to encourage positive behavior
  • Getting off the roller coaster of reactivity

Andrea Waltz and Richard Fenton talk with Bill Ringle about using the power of no to create the results you want in business and in life.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:22 Waltz  tells about her first real job working for LensCrafters: how she met Fenton and launched into her own business at a young age.

2:44 Fenton –  “From my earliest memories, my earliest ages, I had always had a desire to be a professional speaker and to write books.”

3:29 Fenton – Tells about meeting Fenton and meshing on what it meant to be a high performer and achiever.

4:50 Waltz – [On quitting their jobs to start the new company] – “We knew that in order to really make the business work and to burn our ships…we knew that we had to leave and be completely dedicated and completely focused.”

5:44 Waltz – On getting their first client JC Penney.

6:25 Fenton – [On working with JC Penney] – “We worked for them over the course of the next 10 years, we probably did over 25 different projects for them, and over the course of time we did well in excess of $250,000 worth of business.”

7:58 Waltz talks about hers and Fenton’s self-published book The Secrets of Retail Magic and how their “Go For No” concept allowed them to become an essential resource to JCP.

9:03 Waltz tells how Fenton’s boldness got them their first client.

11:08 Waltz – “Our ideal client has a sales force and, ideally, we like working with companies with large sales forces. Right now we focus on doing keynote presentations at the annual conferences. We don’t focus on a specific industry, although we’re very popular in the direct sales and network marketing industry.”

12:00 Waltz – “The problem is that people have a fear of hearing the word ‘No.’ They have a fear of failing, looking like a failure, a fear of rejection. And that’s the problem that we solve.”

12:35 Waltz – “All of the great sales skills that [employees] get trained on are a waste if they are still too scared to use them.”

13:10 Fenton – “It’s far easier to spread your wings within an organization and to expand your reach working from the top down than it is from then bottom up.”

13:55 Fenton describes how changing their positioning to keynoters gave them a better footing with decision makers at an organization.

14:52 Waltz-  “The first thing that we do is that we help people see that they are probably avoiding hearing the word ‘No,’ and we have them identify the facts that they actually have a relationship with the word No. Because one of the things we always ask is that when you get a no, how do you respond?”

15:23 Waltz“80% of our audiences, when they heard the word no they stop, or they assume that they’ve done something wrong or that they are a failure.”

15:53 Waltz discusses the creation of “No Awareness.”

16:17 Fenton – “We try to get people within organizations to do something which is completely counterintuitive, and what we do is teach people to stop setting, at least exclusively, what we call ‘yes goals.’”

16:52 Fenton – “Instead of setting ‘yes’ goals for your business, what if you were to set ‘no’ goals instead?”

17:37 Fenton – “When we work with companies to set ‘No’ goals, we say ‘Ok, what if you were, instead of setting the goal to sell 1 copy machine, what if you were to set the goal to have 10 companies tell you ‘No?”

18:04 Fenton – “In a ‘Go for Yes’ world, most companies slow down when they hit their quota. In a ‘Go for No’ world, if you made your first call and they said ‘Yes’ to you, you still have 10 ‘No’s’ to get.”

18:43 Waltz – “To have no become a positive rather than a negative, so when you do achieve a  goal, like hitting your ‘no goals,’ it does become positive and it is something that you can celebrate.”

19:06 Waltz – “When you only reward yourself for the yes’s, the no’s do become so deflating, depressing, and that ultimately slows people down.”

20:05 Fenton – [On their process] – “It was a shifting in our mental attitude about how we rewarded ourselves for our performance. Traditionally, most people when they set a goal and hit the goal they reward themselves for hitting the goal. Well, Andrea and I realized that we were kind of telling people to do that, but in our real world we weren’t doing that.”

20:37 Fenton – “We said, ‘What if we started celebrating and rewarding ourselves every time we heard the word ‘No.’ And we stopped celebrating and rewarding ourselves every time we heard a ‘Yes?”

21:57 Fenton – “If the shortest distance between you and success is a straight line, the last thing you need is to be going up and down.”

22:00 Waltz and Fenton discuss what they do to overcome the emotional rollercoaster.

 

Expert Bio

Andrea Waltz and Richard Fenton are the co-founders of Courage Crafters, Inc., through which they teach people how to reprogram the way they think about the word NO, and to fail their way to success. They have brought their message to many organizations over the last 15 years, including American Express, Kodak, Pep Boys, Harry & David, and more.

Richard’s background includes working in Distribution Sales for Disney and as Training Director for Hart, Schaffner & Marx and LensCrafters. Andrea originally wanted to work with George Lucas, but after getting rejected (she was 8 years old) she went on to build a career in sales and management at LensCrafters, where was was the youngest General Manager in company history.

Together Richard and Andrea have written four books, the most popular of which is Go for No!, which has been on #1 on Amazon’s ‘Sales & Selling’ Best Seller list and has remained in the top 20 for the last two years. Their articles have been published in Success Magazine and hundreds of online and offline journals. They are members of the National Speakers Association and the Direct Selling Association U.K.

For more information, visit Andrea and Richard’s website.

Contact Info for Andrea Waltz and Richard Fenton

Business Phone: 800-290-5028

Web address: GoForNo.com

Travel From: Orlando, FL

Follow Andrea:
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altBooks by Andrea Waltz and Richard Fenton

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118: What Do You Really Want? – Featured Interview with Michael Bungay Stanier

Author, Speaker, and Senior Partner of Box of Crayons

Michael Bungay Stanier, author of The Coaching Habit, talks with Bill Ringle about how to strengthen your management effectiveness by giving less advice.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • What it means when managers create an environment to stay focused, engaged, and learning as the standard
  • How to avoid being an advice-giving maniac
  • Tactics to get beyond the first answer to a deeper question (which is not the only answer and rarely the best answer)
  • Why your organization will become more productive when there is less of a rush to action
  • What makes up 50% of our waking behavior and rarely gets the attention it deserves

Show Notes

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:23 Stanier describes how his high school peers’ teenage angst inspired him to begin coaching.

1:51 “The typical thing was we’d go out dancing, or something like that, and on the drive home I’d be sort of listening to somebody in the car…I remember feeling right there at the time going ‘you know what? I am obviously ok with this whole listening thing.”

2:34 “When I went to university one of the things I did was I took a telephone crisis counseling course, so effectively a suicide hotline for teens, and that was my first kind of formal training in this area. So I had a sense of how you might respond when somebody’s struggling.”

3:28 [On transitioning from coaching to training] – “But of course these days I actually don’t do very much coaching anymore myself. My real focus is training managers and leaders to be more effective coaches in their day to day working lives.”

4:20 [On the negative connotations of coaching] – “If you’re getting coaching you’re probably broken, you know you’ve screwed up somehow. You know coaching, it’s just a code word for ‘We’re going to fire you in three months time but we’re going to do this token thing before we get to the year 2000.”

4:37 Stanier discusses Daniel Goleman’s HBR article about Emotional Intelligence: Leadership Against Results.

5:00 “You can identify coaching as a style of leadership but [Goleman] said you know even though it really has a great job driving engagement and driving kind of cultural change and driving even bottom-line success, it’s perceived as taking too long and too much effort for it to be a much used leadership style.”

5:24 [On the importance of engaging employees with meaningful work] “What I’ve noticed over the time is that the focus now has turned into: ‘We know that we need to keep our people focused on the stuff that matters and we need to keep people engaged so that they’re doing work that’s meaningful for them.”

6:40 [On John Whitmore’s view of Coaching] – “Its not you unlocking a potential but helping others unlock their own potential and then [Whitmore] says it’s about helping people learn rather than teaching them.”

6:53 Stanier discusses the key distinction between teaching someone and helping them learn.

7:10 [On what really helps people learn] – “Helping them learn is when you help them make their own connections and that’s when new neural pathways kind of happen in the brain that’s when people with potential and capacity and self-sufficiency all increase.”

8:11 Stanier’s tools for leaders in helping their employees get to the next level.

8:19 [On the benefits of offering curiosity] “[The tool] to make your life more effective is to give a little less advice and to offer up a little more curiosity.”

9:07 [The focus question] – “The focus question acknowledges that in many organizations people are very busily, very creatively, with best of intentions coming up with answers to solve the wrong problems.”

9:26: “The focus question is about helping slow down the rush to action and actually spend time trying to figure out what the real challenge might be. So what is that question? Well, it’s pretty simple: it’s simply to ask, ‘What’s the real challenge here for you?”

10:43 [On persisting with the focus question] – “If we stick with that question for a little bit you’re going to find you’ve got better focus on what really needs to be done, but you’re also going to walk away with some insight as to how you’re part of the issue and what you need to do to overcome your own challenges so that you can better answer this problem that’s in front of you.”

12:05 How asking your people the right questions can help them change their behavior.

12:37 [On the benefits of employees taking ownership] – “It’s a very sweet thing when, actually, the person you’re working with understands what’s happening as well as you do because it makes the system even more effective and more efficient.”

13:08 Stanier discusses his company Box of Crayons and its role in managerial training.

13:42: [On why most training programs don’t work] – “Most training programs don’t think hard enough about the behavior change that’s required. How do you shift from new insights into new actions? How do you help people do things differently when they walk out the door? But the other key sites where these things fall short, in my opinion, is that they’re often, I would say, non-strategic; meaning there’s a kind of ad-hoc ‘let’s just throw some training at people and hope that works.’

14:32: How a Canadian company upped their bench strength for better problem solving.

15:42: The best coaching question in the world.

16:38 “The first answer somebody gives you is never the only answer, and it’s rarely the best answer.”

16:59: [On the importance of slowing down] – “The other thing we’re trying to achieve is a
little less rush to action just slow down the action a little bit so that when you move you move more effectively and more efficiently.

17:55 [On the benefits of strategic laziness for managers] “We actually want people to be lazy so that they’re better able to coach the other person. The other person gets to do the work and gets the benefit of the learning, increasing their own capacity, increasing their own potential.”

18:13: “[If] manager finds him or herself working too hard the focus is probably back on them providing [their employees] with the solution rather than helping develop and cultivate the kind of thinking that will make them a more valuable asset to the company.”

19:18 [On helping people use the tools Box of Crayons provides] – “if there’s one thing at the very heart of it all…it’s about teaching people how to build new habits because habits are the building blocks of our behavior.”

19:38 “At least 50% of our waking behavior is purely habitual.”

20:08 Best of the available information concerning habit building.

20:36 The three parts of Stanier’s new habit forming formula.

21:41 [On asking instead of telling] – “Asking a question always takes less than a minute.”

23:17 [On the practical nature of the formula] – “It’s not mystical you don’t have to go up on a retreat you don’t have to sacrifice a small animal, you don’t have to entice a life coach or do anything like that. It’s really practical it feels like this is accessible to anybody.”

23:31 The difficulty of forming new habits to replace old ones.

25:24 “There’s definitely a role for [managers] to play to support and encourage and
help and hold accountable and check in with people, but I wouldn’t write their habits for them…nobody wins from that.”

26:17 “If you’ve got the discipline and the courage and the willingness to be in service to the people who you lead and influence, then you’ll have that greater commitment to be able to. in the moment, be more coach like – which is where the power lies.”

26:53 The characteristics of organizations who are ready to adopt behavioral change.

27:30 “If you were a culture which is massively disengaged, where people have kind of opted out, then this behavior change won’t in itself be sufficient to shift things.”

28:15 Stanier discusses the process of writing the book, and how hiring an editing “coach” helped him create the best version of it.

31:05 “I’m not saying never give anybody any advice ever again, I’m just saying slow down the rush to [give] advice until you really know what the challenge is.”

32:42 “Often advice creates resistance so the very help that you’re offering…it really creates a breakdown in trust and influence when you go for authority first rather than truly looking to understand a problem.”

33:08 [On Edgar Schein’s Helping] “The more you try and thrust help upon people the more you create resistance.”

33:53 The research process for the books – testing with real people.

35:30 The miracle question.

36:08 “I don’t imagine it being 10% better, I imagine it being 10x better.”

36:46 [On the most powerful question: What do you want?] “Once people are clear on what they want that’s actually a strong foundation for some really interesting action.”

37:10 [On the lazy question] – ‘It’s a bit of a paradox of a title because the question is, ‘How can I help?’ And when people hear that they go, ‘That doesn’t sound like a lazy question at all that sounds like it’s more work for me…but [the lazy question] forces them to make an explicit request rather than an implied request.”

37:54 Why explicit requests are far better than implied requests.

41:00 The importance of being clear of what you want in your own mind before asking for it.

Expert Bio

Michael founded Box of Crayons, a company that helps organizations all over the world do less Good Work and more Great Work. The Box of Crayons company is well known for their coaching programs that help time-crunched managers coach in 10 minutes or less.

Michael left Australia 22 years ago to be a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, where he fell in love with a Canadian and explains why he now lives in Toronto. He is the author of Do More Great Work, which has sold over 100,000 copies, and several other books, including his most recent, The Coaching Habit: Say Less, Ask More & Change the Way You Lead Forever.

For more information, visit Michael’s website.

Contact Info for Michael Bungay Stanier

Web address: http://www.boxofcrayons.biz

Travels from: Toronto, ON

Phone: (416) 532-1322

Contact:

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Resources Mentioned by Michael Bungay Stanier:

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michael tchong

117: Ubertrending – Featured Interview with Michael Tchong

Change Agent and Founder of Social Revolution

Michael Tchong talks with Bill Ringle about Ubertrends and how they are shaping our business opportunities and personal lives.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • Why analytics will become increasingly important to companies in planning
  • The Ubertrends of multitasking and control freak that technology has created
  • What to look for in global competition
  • How it is smart to use the technology you write about for clients to gain an advantage in your own business
  • Favorite sources to study to learn about Ubertrends in society, technology, and global business

 

Expert Bio

Michael Tchong is an innovation specialist, change agent, entrepreneur, and speaker. He is the founder of five startups, including MacWEEK and ICONOCAST, and has pioneered ventures in desktop publishing, personal information management, internet analytics, and online marketing. His latest startup is Social Revolution®, which aims to reinvent America by crowdsourcing innovative solutions.

As a speaker, Michael uses his knowledge of marketing, media, and technology to help audiences better grasp how massive waves, which he calls “Ubertrends,” are reshaping society, as well as the opportunities and innovations these Ubertrends propel. His ability to identify emerging trends was refined at such prestigious ad agencies as DDB and Chiat/Day. He is the author of Social Engagement Marketing, an easy-to-navigate guide to the world of social media.

For more information, visit Michael’s website.

Contact Info for Michael Tchong

Web address: MichaelTchong.com

Web address: ubercool.com

Travels From: San Francisco, CA

Follow Michael:

Twitter LinkedIn Facebook

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Doug Conant2

116: Turning the Coin Over – Featured Interview with Doug Conant

CEO of ConantLeadership and former CEO of Campbell Soup Co.

Former CEO of Campbell Soup Co. Doug Conant talks to Bill Ringle about personal leadership and taking charge of the things you can actually control.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How getting fired can lead to new and better opportunities
  • What it means to “turn the coin over” when presented with a problem
  • The two top qualities of mind that set exceptional leaders apart from well-intentioned leaders
  • How you can use the criteria to win in the marketplace in your own business
  • What resulted from combining the social agenda with the value agenda at Cambell’s Soup for employees and other stakeholders

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:12 Where Conant started his career, moving from Kellogg in Chicago to General Mills in Minnesota.

2:05 [On how to get things done] – “I learned very early on that most of the people I worked with had full lives. If they were going to be helpful to me, I generally needed to be helpful to them.”

2:53 How getting fired from General Mills played a pivotal role in Conant’s career, and how meeting executive outplacement counselor Neil McKenna helped get Conant made the difference in getting him back on his feet.

4:45 “It reaffirmed for me the importance of just trying to be helpful, to be helpful in a thoughtful caring way, with intentionality to move the enterprise forward.”

5:27 [Lessons learned: The Importance of Empathy] – “My first thought was one of betrayal and devastation, I had given everything to this company for nine years, and I felt it was incredibly insensitive the way it was handled. And that was a good thing too because I’ve had to make tough calls too, but I’ve made them in a caring way.”

6:45 Turning the coin over after devastating news.

8:09 [Paraphrasing Louis L’Amour on Perseverance] –  “He never knew when he was licked, so he never was.”

9:37 “Great things are having powerful incremental impacts in the moment with people.”

10:21 “Life is just a sequence of interactions. And if I’m really alert and thinking abundantly I find that I can be helpful in those small interactions, and cumulatively over time, I develop enormous credibility, which Stephen Covey might call a very positive emotional bank account with people. And as we build the emotional bank account up, it’s amazing what we find we are able to do collectively and individually.”

11:01 “It’s about making it personal. People are either at work or thinking about work, more than anything else they do, including spending time with their families. I think we sort of have to honor that as sacred ground, their work, and I think we have to take it personally.”

11:19 “I have found that if I make it personal and it I lean into creating a personally fulfilling work experience for people, they lean into the agenda of the company in a more personal and committed way.”

11:41 “Make it personal, be alert to the moment – be helpful in the moment, are two of the foundational ideas that I have…The third one would be that leadership, ultimately, it starts with personal leadership and getting comfortable with the things you can control.”

12:20 “If you really want to be good at leadership, my observation is that you have to treat it as a mastery model. You have to apprentice at it, you have to work at it, you have study it, you have to be thoughtful about it, you have to think through your philosophy of how you want to walk in the world and how you want to lead.”

13:06 “I take issue, for the most part, with this concept of born leaders. Some leaders have a capacity to lead at a certain level that may be above average, but to be great I guarantee you they all work at at.”

13:17 Jack Welch’s leadership work ethic.

14:14 Some of the problems Campbell’s faced internally and externally before Conant took leadership in the company.

16:33 “We were overpraising and under delivering and making bad decisions to patch up the performance.”

18:29 Conant lists the four criteria you need to win in the marketplace.

21:01 [On challenges in taking over leadership at Campbell’s] – “It literally took a few years to get the kind of traction we needed and get the company on solid footing.”

23:04 “I was going to bed thinking about all of the things we needed to do 365 days a year for the first three years.”

23:45 “Employees are not mind readers. You need to tell them what’s expected and how to expected to deliver that performance.”

24:25 “The more clear we could be, the more accessible the whole came to every employee.”

24:34 How Conant used the “Balanced Scorecard” create clarity and direction for employees.

25:50 “The single most important thing in any of these organizations is employee engagement.”

26:32 “I have found over time that if I just focus on the people, the people take care of the business. But if you have to put one over the other, you put the people first.”

27:02 The Campbell Success Model – metrics for management.

29:14 The Boston College reputation institute.

30:17 [Campbell’s success model] – “Winning in the workplace, winning in the marketplace, winning in the community, and winning with integrity.”

30:59 “It helps to have metrics, it helps to create focus for the organization that says, at a high level, this is what we stand for as a company.”

32:04 “The more engaged people can become in the work of the enterprise, the better you’ll do.”

32:15 Four things which drive employee engagement.

33:15 “Driving an aggressive social agenda, while we were driving an aggressive economic value creation agenda was very synergistic. Because we were saying, ‘Here’s how you can leave a legacy of contribution through your work that transcends your ordinary work experience while you’re making a living, while you’re feeling valued, and while you’re learning.”

33:44 “The more we leaned into building a better world, the more engaged our employees got, and the better we performed in the marketplace.”

35:14 “I think the challenge in the next decade is going to be for corporations to build this intuitively obvious practice more into the fabric of how they run their companies.”

36:01 Examples of companies building a better world by building better companies.

37:11 “All organizations aspire to be relevant in the world, to certainly create economic value, but they also are committed to enduring success. All leaders want to be associated with enduring success. And they see the value in being good citizens.”

38:12 “It’s important that once you declare yourself, you deliver on it.”

39:24 What Conant reads for inspiration.

Expert Bio

Doug Conant is the founder and CEO of ConantLeadership, which is dedicated to helping improve the quality of leadership in the 21st century. He is passionate about employee engagement and firmly believes in the importance of coming up with your own leadership model.

Doug was appointed President and CEO of Campbell Soup Company in 2001. Under his leadership, Campbell reversed a precipitous decline in market value and employee engagement; the company has won many recognitions since, including the prestigious 2010 Catalyst Award. When Doug retired in 2011, he received the American Society of Training and Development (ASTD) 2011 Champion of Workplace Learning and Performance Award.

Doug joined Campbell with 25 years of experience from three of the world’s leading food companies: General Mills, Kraft and Nabisco. He began his career in 1976 in marketing at General Mills. After 10 years, he moved to Kraft where he held top management positions in marketing and strategy. Immediately prior to coming to Campbell, he was President of the $3.5 billion Nabisco Foods Company where he led his team to improved marketplace performance and five consecutive years of double-digit earnings growth.

During his tenure at Campbell, Doug established the Campbell CEO Institute to train the company’s future leaders and ensure that the company’s highest-potential employees were well-equipped to handle the challenges and surprises that inevitably create a leader’s impact and legacy.

He is now a sought-after speaker on leading with integrity and other business topics, and is the co-author of the New York Times bestselling book TouchPoints: Creating Powerful Leadership Connections in the Smallest of Moments.

For more information, visit Doug’s website.

 

Contact Info for Doug Conant

Web address: ConantLeadership.com

Travels From: Philadelphia, PA

Follow Doug: Twitter

Books by Doug Conant

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Dave-logan

111: The Oracle Question – Featured Interview with Dave Logan

Co-Founder and Senior Partner of Culture Sync, Author New York, NY

In this interview, Dave Logan talks to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about the role of management in business.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • What’s easy vs. important.
  • What to do if something unexpected comes along. 

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

0:59 Dave discusses how he became interested in business, and talks about the role that management plays in business.

1:34 Dave’s father enjoyed his job until management changed, which is what Dave considers the catalyst of interest in working on fixing the “conspiracy toward mediocrity.”

4:10 “Running a company… requires a lot of raw intelligence.”

7:22 “When people are struggling, they do what’s easy rather than do what’s right.”

7:55 Dave talks about an addiction to the status quo, and that often businesses don’t want to rock the boat when they really should be changing with the times.

9:03 Even when it’s uncomfortable, often the best thing for businesses leaders is to get out of the way of others who can do their job better.

10:14 Business leaders must follow their gut and intuition when answering important questions.

10:40 Dave brings up the Oracle Question: “What is likely to happen in the business if nothing unexpected comes along?”

11:05 People act as if their answer to the Oracle Question is the right answer, but depending on their answer, this can negatively impact the business.

11:41 Dave lists the ways in which this sense of superiority can cause a lack of forward movement and growth.

12:21 “Even if they are preaching vision and change and growth… when you actually examine what they do, there’s a default future, the answer to the Oracle Question, that is something other than they are preaching, and they and other people are actively bringing that about. And I think that’s the most important question that business leaders can ever ask.”

12:51 Dave gives an example of a business with which he has worked that was not aware of this questioning process, which led to an undesirable default future.

18:34 “When you actually figure it out and implement it, there’s this wave of enthusiasm and relief and passion and innovation, and every thing that people want ends up happening naturally. You don’t need to bribe people into innovating; they just do it.”

19:34 Dave tells us that there are four things that a business needs to get right, and that there is at least one of the four that need attention: Strategy, Structure, Systems and Processes, and Culture.

20:23 There is an instrument on Dave’s website that can help a business leader find which of the four needs to be reviewed.

21:26 Most of what analysts have written about Culture is dead wrong, and Dave’s book Tribal Leadership discusses how to get it right.

22:14 DaveLogan.com contains a free download for the audiobook of Tribal Leadership, a free instrument called Fix Your Company, and other instruments that can rate a business’ culture.

22:50 The objective of these free instruments on his website is to help a business leader see what is really going on in one’s company.

23:12 Dave was surprised to learn that very few employees would devote themselves to the company’s values, regardless of the bottom line.

25:20 One of the most widespread problems in management is that many of the management techniques are out of date.

Expert Bio

Dave Logan studies how people communicate within a company — and how to harness our natural gifts to make change within organizations. He looks at emerging patterns of corporate leadership, organizational transformation, generational differences in the workplace, and team building for high-potential managers and executives.

He’s the co-founder and senior partner at CultureSync, a management consulting firm, and works with Fortune 500 companies, governments, and nonprofits. Much of CultureSync’s work is derived from a ten-year study of over 24,000 people published at Tribal Leadership (2008), which shows how organizational culture evolves over time and how leaders can nudge it forward.

For more information, view Dave on CultureSync.net

Contact Info for Dave Logan

Web address: CultureSync.net

Follow Dave: Twitter linkedin facebook

 Books by Dave Logan

tribal-leadership

kevin cashman

104: Leadership from the Inside Out – Interview with Kevin Cashman

Bestselling Author, Global CEO Coach, and Senior Partner at Korn/Ferry

Minneapolis, MN

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The value of both outer tools (strategy, communications, team building, finance,…) and inner tools (self-awareness of values, character, talents, vision,…) for great leaders
  • What it takes to transform the volatility, unpredictability, complex, and ambiguous elements to those of vision, understanding, clarity, and agility
  • How it took 9 years of research and 1 year of writing to create The Pause Principle book
  • What steps Kevin took to add a “pause environment” in his home

Expert Bio

Over the past 30 years, Kevin Cashman has been involved in coaching and developing thousands of senior executives and senior teams in more than 60 countries. He is recognized as a pioneer in leadership development and executive coaching, focusing on optimizing executive, team, and organizational performance. He was recently named one of the top ten thought leaders by Leadership Excellencemagazine.

Kevin joined Korn/Ferry Leadership and Talent Consulting in 2006 via its acquisition of LeaderSource, a firm he founded and that was ranked as one of the top three in leadership development globally. Kevin is also the founder of the Executive to Leader Institute®, an interdisciplinary approach to leadership development and executive coaching, and Chief Executive Institute®, a comprehensive, integrated, globally delivered leadership development and coaching program for CEOs and CEO successors.

A frequent keynote speaker at conferences and corporate events, Kevin is a senior fellow of the Caux Roundtable, a global consortium of CEOs dedicated to enhancing principle-based leadership internationally. He is also a board member for the Center for Ethical Business Cultures fostering ethical leadership in corporations.

Kevin is the author of five books on leadership and career development, including The Pause Principle and Awakening the Leader Within. His breakout bestseller, Leadership from the Inside Out, was named the #1 bestselling business book of 2000 and one of the top twenty bestselling business books of the decade by 800-CEO-READ. He has written numerous articles and papers on leadership and career management, and has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Chief Executive, Human Resource Executive, Fast Company, Strategy & Leadership, Oprah, CNN, National Public Radio, and other national media. Kevin was formerly the host of CareerTalk.

For more information, visit Kevin’s website.

Contact Info for Kevin Cashman

Business Phone: 612-746-5166 

Web address: LeadershipFromTheInsideOut.com

Travels From: Minneapolis, MN

Follow Kevin: Twitter

Books by Kevin Cashman

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rodger dean duncan

101: Change Friendly Leadership – Interview with Rodger Dean Duncan

Founder and CEO of Duncan Worldwide

Kansas City, MO

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • What newscaster Jim Lehrer taught Rodger about good interviewing
  • Why it is important to set up and maintain an environment to challenge the status quo
  • How an losing agra business turned itself around in 12 months and yielded a $252 million profit
  • Points of effective communication with a change initiative
  • The importance of being wiling to be influenced

Expert Bio

After an early career as an award-winning journalist and university professor, Dr. Rodger Dean Duncan founded Duncan Worldwide in 1972 to serve the needs of organizations seeking to boost performance. His client roster ranges from American Airlines, IBM, Consolidated Edison, and Sprint, to Black & Veatch Engineering, eBay, Federal Reserve Bank, and presidential cabinet officers in two White House administrations.

A highly-sought-after speaker, trainer, and executive coach, Rodger is widely known for his expertise in the strategic management of change – for individuals as well as for organizations. He has been the keynote speaker at many industry conferences and workshops related to human performance and organizational effectiveness. In addition to his consulting practice, Rodger headed worldwide communication for Campbell Soup Company and was vice president of a global energy company.

Rodger is the author of Change-friendly Leadership: How to Transform Good Intentions into Great Performance. The Duncan Report, his Internet column on leadership and organizational effectiveness, now reaches opt-in business subscribers in over 130 countries.

For more information, visit Rodger’s website.

Contact Info for Dr. Rodger Dean Duncan

Business Phone: 816-415-1605 

Web address: DoctorDuncan.com

Travels From: Kansas City, MO

Follow Rodger: Twitter

Books by Dr. Rodger Dean Duncan

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nick sarillo

100: A Slice of the Pie – Featured Interview with Nick Sarillo

Author, Speaker, and CEO of Nick’s Pizza & Pub

Chicago, IL

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The most important aspect of a business is not it’s product or people or process, but another “p” word
  • The importance of making your company values current and present to each employee so that employees can use values in day-to-day decision making
  • The case of the burned bottom pizza, and the broader lessons any business owner can draw from it
  • Why you need to oversee multiple health dimensions of a business for all stakeholders
  • What exceptional factors drives higher profits and lower turnover in a traditionally slim margin and low commitment business that you can model in your business

Expert Bio

Nick Sarillo is the founder and CEO of Nick’s Pizza & Pub, the sixth busiest independent pizza company in per-store sales in the United States. Founded with the purpose of providing the community with an unforgettable place where families could relax and have fun, Nick’s Pizza & Pub has margins nearly twice that of the average pizza restaurant and boasts an 80 percent employee retention rate in an industry in which the average annual turnover is over 150 percent.

A regular speaker at entrepreneurship and HR conferences, Sarillo credits his company’s success to his purpose-driven culture. Nick is also the author of A Slice of the Pie: How to Build a Big Little Business, which offers small business owners a handbook for creating a culture that will support a business through good times and bad – even in an industry where turnover is high, expectations are low, and a college degree is not required.

For more information, visit Nick’s website.

Contact Info for Nick Sarillo

Web address: NickSarillo.com

Travels From: Chicago, IL

Follow Nick:
Twitter LinkedIn Facebook

Books by Nick Sarillo

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neil smith

99: How Excellent Companies Avoid Dumb Things – Interview with Neil Smith

CEO of Promontory Growth and Innovation

Manhasset, NY

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • Identifying the structural and human obstacles to change
  • About how Bank of America generated 150,000 ideas for improvement and engaged on the path to improvement through this process
  • Why the fear of the unknown is always a give with change programs, and how to handle it
  • Examples of how to create the right environment for change

Expert Bio

Neil Smith, CEO of Promontory Growth and Innovation, has for the last 20 years focused on helping large corporations dramatically improve performance and profitability by growing revenues and innovatively reducing costs. Neil has led initiatives across a number of industries with some of the strongest companies in the United States, including Mellon Bank, Willis, and North American Van Lines. He recently spearheaded the highly-visible initiative across Bank of America and a firm he co-founded was responsible for projects at Heinz, Detroit Edison, and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee. His efforts have helped increase profits at top companies by 20 percent or more.

Neil is the co-author of the book How Excellent Companies Avoid Dumb Things, which illustrates eight key barriers that are holding back even the world’s best organizations and twelve principles that are important in any process for change.

Neil has an MBA from the Harvard Business School where he was a Knox Fellow and a B.A. in Physics and Economics from the University of Keele in England, where he graduated with Honours. He is a member of the International Advisory Board of British American Business, the President of the North American Foundation for Keele University and head of the university’s alumni association in North America.

For more information, visit Neil’s website.

Contact Info for Neil Smith

Business Phone: 212-542-6850

Web address: NeilSmithInsights.com

Web address: PromGrowth.com

Travels From: New York City, NY

Books by Neil Smith

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lisa gansky

92: Why the Future of Business is Sharing: Featured Interview with Lisa Gansky

Marketect, Author, and Business Advisor

Lisa Gansky talks to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about how capital flows into startup, entrepreneurship, and the early days of the internet.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How successful companies are built on incredibly talented, committed people
  • An early insight about how the Internet would level the playing field led to forming a startup acquired by AOL
  • Implications of how technology advances have lowered the barriers to entry dramatically
  • Where to find entrepreneurs creating new ideas and companies in major cities
  • Where on the balance sheet many companies can find underutilized and undervalued assets
  • How the meshing.it database became the foundation for both the book as well as an open source resource
  • Clues and tips for finding life-work balance

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:32 [On being an entrepreneur] – “The ability to see an opportunity or to hear someone with a really great idea and recognize it, that’s the number one thing.”

2:13 “Being an entrepreneur is more jazz than symphony, it’s more impromptu.”

2:59 Gansky tells the story of her Russian Immigrant entrepreneur grandfather and his linen business – “I learned many things from him. One of which was his incredible way of reading people and interacting with people, making people really comfortable, and trying to understand what they were trying to do with their business.”

4:15 “Though I didn’t finish college, I was trained in science, and I’ve always had a real interest in science/biology especially.” 

5:30 Gansky tells about GNN, the first commercial website. – “I started to see the internet when it was in its most extreme infancy.”

7:00 [On the birth of the internet] – “There were all sorts of media types – video, audio. There were all sorts of people with crazy ideas and applications that this could appeal to.”

7:37 [On selling GNN to AOL] –  “It was just being around really great people, at the right time.”

8:05 How the tech industry’s culture of collaboration fostered the rise of the major internet companies.

9:33 [On photography in the pre-kodak era] – “I just really loved taking pictures, but I really hated the business of being in the distribution business – printing and writing little notes and going to the post office and doing all that.”

11:02 [On the reaction shift from film to digital] – “It became really clear to us how rapidly this shift was taking place, and we started to build out what was the first photo sharing and printing service, which got bought 2 years later by Kodak.”

11:45 How Gansky’s team developed oFoto and generated $60M in revenue. – “I look at oFoto as kind of the first social network that connected eCommerce.”

14:30 [On selling oFoto to Kodak] – “Once I lost control of the brand, it was going to be very challenging to keep the service as it was.”

15:35 Gansky explains what her team goes through now to vigorously test new ideas. “If it goes through this process and survives, then we go and get this thing funded.”

17:28 “What often happens is that new of our working on something leaks out and investors are in a conversation even before we’re ready to talk.”

18:30 The role of “meshy” collaboration.

18:52 [On how Mesh came about] – “There were two things that brought it together for me. One was that there was this idea that we raise $60M to do oFoto, and I looked around in 2008 and thought: ‘If I were going to start oFoto today,’ I asked myself the question, ‘what would I need to do it?’”

20:00 “The entry point of being an entrepreneur is so low right now, you can create a little idea or a product and get it to market in all sorts of ways.”

21:12 “All ventures should be social, if we aren’t making the customers’ we’re targeting lives better, then it’s not a sustainable business.”

22:34 “Cities are places where there’s lots of people and less space.”

24:36 How SaaS has changed the game. “It’s available as a buy the drink business model, as opposed to having to own the whole thing.”

24:58 [On the new business model] – “We don’t have to own things but we can access what we want, when we want it, and pay for just what we use is gaining traction.”

25:36 “Last century was a century of ownership, and we’re moving to a world in which access to goods, services, and talent triumphs over ownership.”

26:02 “Unused value = waste.”

27:50 How co-working spaces help Gansky work while on the road.

29:02 “If I’m really wanting to not be disturbed, I sit on a plane or go home and work…Being in a co-working space is a really vital, really exciting environment. I really enjoy it. It’s social when you want it to be, but it has a little bit of everything.”

31:07 “You bring the part that you’re great at to people who are looking for your part of the puzzle.”

33:21 Types of car services capitalizing on the idea of unused value = waste.

35:19 [On Gansky’s database] – “Each author or each artist can determine how they want their work distributed.”

35:58 [On how Gansky stays focused and productive] – “I start my day and end my day by going outside, because it if I didn’t force myself to do that…then I would get sucked in, and it still happens.”

36:33 The enjoyment of unnecessary travel. “It’s allows me to get out of my own head and observe people, and listen to conversations.”

38:19 “I think it’s really helpful to not take things so seriously.”

Expert Bio

Lisa Gansky is, at heart, a marketect and “impact junky” with a strong interest in breaking the edges of formerly happy business models and bringing together not-so-likely characters in the form of new offerings, teams and partnerships. She is the author of The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing.

As CEO, co-founder and chairman of Ofoto, Lisa drew on her entrepreneurial spirit and experience developing global web services. Lisa and the team worked to develop Ofoto into a world-class consumer services offering which she left once Kodak Gallery reached over 45M customers in 2005. In addition to her roles at Ofoto and Eastman Kodak, she was a Co-founder and CEO of GNN, the first commercial website, acquired by AOL in 1995, where she then directed Internet Services for AOL through 1997.

Lisa has been an investor and board member of more than twenty internet and mobile services companies. Currently, she serves as an advisor and investor in New Resource Bank, Vayable, Loosecubes, TaskRabbit, RelayRides, Scoot Networks, Squidoo, Greenbiz, Pixelpipe, Mingoville, and Honest Buildings.

For more information, visit Lisa’s website.

Contact Info for Lisa Gansky

Web address: LisaGansky.com

Web address: Meshing.it

Travels From: San Francisco, CA

Follow Lisa:

Twitter Facebook

Books by Lisa Gansky

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josh linkner

91: Disciplined Dreaming – Featured Interview with Josh Linkner

Bestselling Author and Founder and CEO, Detroit Venture Partners

Detroit, MI

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How creativity is the new currency of success
  • The most exciting news about creativity (hint: it’s something we can all tap within ourselves)
  • What one corporation did to encourage calculated risk-taking among all employees
  • What creating an arch enemy does for boosting creativity at all levels in a company
  • A novel technique for overcoming timid ideas in brainstorming sessions

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:35 How an interest in jazz music sparked Linkner’s early passion for creativity.

1:55 “Creativity, truly, is the currency of success.”

2:08 “Today with the challenges of our times more difficult than ever, creativity has shifted from a ‘nice to have’ to ‘mission critical.’”

2:31 “In business we’re often heads down and doing task-oriented things and are following a manual, procedure, or process. In creativity involves using your imagination to come up with new ways, whether it’s a new product or service, or new way to communicate and tell the story of your business.”

2:59 “What we’ve found is that following the operating manual is no pathway to success. If anything that we learned from the financial crisis of 2008, it’s that the rules of the game have fundamentally changed.”

3:25 Why improvisation is such a valuable skill in the marketplace.

3:44 “In today’s world of dizzying speed, exponential complexity, and ruthless competition, creativity has really become job #1. A recent survey of 1500 CEO’s across 32 countries reveal that the #1 most important attribute for success in the next 5 years of business, in fact, is creativity.”

4:09 “What we need more than ever aren’t people who can just do what they’re told and follow the rules and cut costs, we need people that can think on their feet and who can innovate new products and services, and reimagine the way they do work. The people that are always obsessed with finding a better way.”

4:19 “Creativity is fundamentally a learned behavior, which means that all of us as human beings have enormous creative potential, we just need a systematic approach to unleashing it.”

5:13 “Most of us are brought up in environments that restrict creativity. We’re taught in school to follow the rules, there’s only one right answer, and whatever you do don’t make any mistakes. The problem is that if you run that game plan in the real world, if you run that game plan today, it’s a surefire path to mediocrity. Doing exactly the opposite is what allows us to reach our potential.”

5:41 Examples of companies who are fostering creativity well.

6:34 “So many individuals in companies spend their lives trying to play it safe, only to discover playing it safe has become the riskiest move at all.”

6:47 “The companies that embrace making mistakes and failing along the way, understanding that mistakes are the portals of discovery, are the ones that truly thrive and are building sustainable organizations.”

7:15 The story of ePrize and how they used creativity to stay ahead of competitors, even the ones they invented themselves.

9:52 “The most important natural resource of all is the human creativity that lives inside your team…Your job as a leader is not just to manage costs, but to help unleash that creative capacity.”

10:27 Why the way leaders interact with their teams affect productivity or, in some cases, keep employees from unlocking their creative potential.

11:50 How 3M fosters continually fosters innovation.

12:41 “No matter how big or successful you get, you always want to be focused on reinvention. You always want to be the force of disruptive change. Because it’s always more fun to be the disruptor than the disruptee.”

13:20 The difference between incremental and disruptive change.

13:29 “Disruptive thinking has to start with the ability to imagine what can be, instead of what is. It’s about imagining the possibilities and not being restricted by the way things currently are.”

14:25 The story of Detroit and its innovative early years, complacent middle years, and its rebirth of innovation in current years.

15:51 [On Detroit’s future] “Creativity can be applied not only to small companies, but even to troubled cities.”

16:38 “Sometimes the only way to make progress is through bold action.”

17:55 What if the Founding Fathers had not taken bold action?

18:30 The prevalent myths of creativity.

19:16 “Everyone in an organization, irrespective of job title, not only has the ability to be creative, has the responsibility to be creative.”

19:50 Why it’s important to spend time doing things you enjoy away from work.

20:15 The art of role-storming, rather than brainstorming.

Expert Bio

Josh Linkner is the New York Times bestselling author of Disciplined Dreaming: A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity, named one of the top 10 business books of 2011. He is also the CEO and Managing Partner of Detroit Venture Partners where, together with business partners Earvin “Magic” Johnson and NBA team owner Dan Gilbert, Josh is actively rebuilding urban areas through technology and entrepreneurship.

Josh is the Founder, Chairman, and former CEO of ePrize, the largest interactive promotion agency in the world providing digital marketing services for 74 of the top 100 brands, and has founded three other successful technology companies. He is also Adjunct Professor of Applied Creativity at the University of Michigan.

He has been honored as the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year and the Detroit News Michiganian of the Year, and is a President Barack Obama Champion of Change award recipient. Josh is a regular columnist for Fast Company and Inc. Magazine, and his work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, USA Today, and The New York Times.

Josh is also a Berklee-trained professional jazz guitarist who performs regularly in jazz clubs throughout the United States. Most importantly, Josh is on a mission to make the world more creative.

For more information, visit Josh’s website.

Contact Info for Josh Linkner

Business Phone: 760-603-8110

Web address: JoshLinkner.com

Travels From: Detroit, MI

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