Leadership Archives • My Quest for the Best

Category Archives for "Leadership"

Susan Packard, author of FULLY HUMAN

216: Develop Your Emotional Fitness as a Leader: Interview with Susan Packard

Susan Packard, author of FULLY HUMAN

Susan Packard and Bill Ringle discuss how to grow your emotional fitness in work, leadership. and life.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top 3 Take-Aways from this Interview

  • The essence of good leadership is to take care of yourself and others, and to do so requires emotional fitness.
  • Being fully human at work and in your life means committing to a wider range of standards than just output or productivity. 
  • Trust is the lifeblood of any organization, from a start-up to an enterprise like HGTV. 

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

Looking at time as a resource really helps you to navigate your life wisely.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetSometimes people need to air out the things that have kept them stuck.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetWe do what we have been trained to do.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetStart something that you personally love but do make sure that you have a market big enough to sustain your business.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetPeople want to work for people that they respect, trust, and feel connected to.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetIn anything you do, consider the customer first.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetIf you are running a business and not thinking about the customers, you are not going to be in business for long.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetIf you want to change your product, always talk with your customers.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To TweetAlways make sure you build titanium strength culture so you have the benefit of your people's experience as part of your decision making.>> #MQ4B Ep216 with Susan Packard (@PackardSusan), author of Fully Human Click To Tweet

Interview Insights

Read the Show Notes from this Episode

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Expert Bio 

Author and entrepreneur Susan Packard was one of a small number of women leaders who were a part of the newly created cable industry, helping in the launch of HBO and CNBC. She went on to be a co-founder of HGTV and Scripps Network.

An in-demand speaker at summits, TEDX, and corporate events, as well as a guest expert on television and radio, and op-ed contributor, Packard is a pioneer in both the industry she helped to shape and the workplace she works to redefine.

She is the author of New Rules of the Game and the just released Fully Human: 3 Steps to Grow your Emotional Fitness in Work, Leadership and Life.

MQ4B-Featured-Susan Packard, Author of Fully Human

Contact Info for Susan Packard

Web address: www.susanpackard.com

Travels from: Lakeville, CT

 Social  Media Links:

​Books Authored by the Guest

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

213: Asking Better Questions Improves Business: an interview with Warren Berger

Warren Berger, author of The Book of Beautiful Questions

Warren Berger and Bill Ringle discuss the power of asking proper questions and how these powerful questions will help you decide, create, connect, and lead better.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top 3 Take-Aways from this Interview

  • Curiosity is a business leader's most important quality.
  • What are the limits of a question?
  • The idea that every business leader should audit the quality of the questions she or he asks.

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

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Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

WARREN BERGER developed his inquiry skills as a journalist for The New York Times but first declared himself a “questionologist” with the 2014 publication of his best-selling book, A MORE BEAUTIFUL QUESTION. The book shows that questioning has been the starting point of everything from the cell phone, to Netflix, to the International Red Cross.

In the book, Warren introduces an original framework (the “Why/What If/How” cycle of inquiry) that can be applied to challenges and problems. A More Beautiful Question has been embraced by the NASA space program, the National Science Foundation, companies such as Starbucks, Chanel, Oracle, and Pepsi, as well as by major universities around the country.

Warren has keynoted at the DesignThinkers Conference in Toronto and the International Women’s Conference in Rome. He also regularly visits elementary and high schools around the country, urging teachers to try to encourage more questioning in the classroom.

In the fall of 2018, Warren released a follow-up book on questioning, THE BOOK OF BEAUTIFUL QUESTIONS: The Powerful Questions That Will Help You Decide, Create, Connect, and Lead.

In addition to authoring eight books (including the acclaimed GLIMMER, one of the first books on “design thinking”), Warren has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered, CNN, and NBC’s Today Show, and he contributes regularly to Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, and Psychology Today, where he writes the “Questionologist” column.

MQ4B-Featured-Warren Berger

Contact Info for Warren Berger

Web address: www.amorebeautifulquestion.com

Travels from: Mount Kisco, New York

 Social  Media Links:

Books Authored by the Guest

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

Here is the special offer that Warren referenced during the interview just for our listeners – a special list of:

10 questions to help you be a more effective leader

Thanks so much, Warren! 

207: Charming Cheaters – Interview with Nicole Kelly, M.D

Nicole Kelly M.D., Physician and Author

Nicole Kelly M.D. and Bill Ringle discuss how common and dangerous it is to work with sociopaths, and yet how seldom we think it could happen to one of us.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top Take-Aways from this Interview

  • Not everyone thinks like you do, to think otherwise is dangerous.
  • The differences between a psychopath, a sociopath, and a sexopath.
  • Just because someone is a jerk, it doesn’t mean that they’re a psychopath or a sociopath. Only a licensed medical professional can make that kind of diagnosis.
  • How recognition of certain dangerous characteristics can help in the hiring process, and why it’s so important to document questionable behaviors in new employees.
  • What the empathetic majority can do to better interact with those on the sociopathic spectrum. 

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

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Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

Nicole Kelly, M.D. is a board-certified physician in Nashville, TN who was victimized by a sociopath – who also turned out to be a sociopathic sex addict or sexopath – who embezzled over $700,000 from her medical practice. Using her ability to explain complicated medical concepts, Dr. Kelly makes clear one of the most important truths of our time: Not everyone thinks like you do—and to assume otherwise is dangerous.

For more about Nicole Kelly M.D., visit her website.

Contact Info for Nicole Kelly, M.D.


Web address: https://www.nicolekellymd.com/

Travels from: Nashville, TN

Social Media Links

Books Authored by the Guest

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

203: When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, Interview with Dan Pink

Dan Pink, Bestselling Author

Dan Pink and Bill Ringle discuss how entrepreneurs can organize their days to be the most productive and efficient. When it comes to success, the important question to ask is when. 

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top Take-Aways from this Interview

  • Why writing a book proposal can help you decide whether or not you want to write the book that you thought you were going to write.
  • The best time to do something depends on what it is you’re doing. For example, going to the doctor’s office in the afternoon is more dangerous than going during the morning.
  • How beginnings, midpoints, and endings affect us, and how to recognize temporal landmarks to use them for our benefit.
  • How to recognize the Larks, Owls. and Middles when coming up with time-based directives for your team.
  • Breaks make us better, certain kinds of breaks make us so much better. 

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Subscribe to My Quest for the Best on Your Favorite App

Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

Daniel H. Pink is the author of six books — including his newest, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, which has spent four months on the New York Times bestseller list. His other books include the long-running New York Times bestseller A Whole New Mind and the #1 New York Times bestsellers Drive and To Sell is Human. His books have won multiple awards and have been translated into 39 languages. He lives in Washington, DC, with his wife and their three children.

For more about Dan Pink, visit his website.

Contact Info for Dan Pink


Web address: www.danpink.com

Travels from: Washington, DC

Social Media Links

Books Authored by the Guest

Other Resources Mentioned During the Interview

199: Highly Sensitive Entrepreneurs – Featured Interview with Heather Dominick

Founder of A Course In Business Miracles®

Bill Ringle and Heather Dominick discuss the nuances of being a highly sensitive entrepreneur and how to use your abilities to thrive in business as other relationships.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top Take-Aways from this Interview

  • How to identify highly sensitive entrepreneurs
  • What to do when struggling with emotional overwhelm as a highly sensitive person
  • The roles of Royal Advisors and what they do for the world
  • The 3 HSE Coping Mechanisms
  • How a Highly Sensitive Dentist was able to overcome her tendency towards combo plattering and unify the office

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

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Read the Show Notes from this Episode

Subscribe to My Quest for the Best on Your Favorite App

Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

Can you be highly successful in business and highly spiritual at the same time. Let’s take this question a step further. Is there a direct relationship between your spirituality and great success?

Heather Dominick is a woman who is impressively successful, and highly spiritual. A former high school drama teacher who collaborated with none other than Bette Midler. A graduate of NYU where she received her first coach training. Heather is the winner of the 2015 Best of Manhattan Coaching Award and creator of the 2014 Stevie award winning virtual event A Course In Business Miracles®: 21-Day Discovery Series that attracted close to 6,000 official registrants from all around the world including: Iceland, Nigeria, Russia, Asia, South America, Australia, Europe and the U.S.

She has appeared on Lifetime Television and has been published in numerous books including Stepping Stones to Success alongside Deepak Chopra

An exceptional facilitator and teacher Heather is known for creating a safe, sacred community for true transformation whether she is teaching a Business Miracles® Class, delivering training online or in-person or mentoring members of her Business Miracles Community in her various Mentoring Programs. She has helped thousands of HSE®s release life-long limiting beliefs, overcome fears and learn how to build their business in a way that actually feels so good that they can’t help but create solid, sustainable, high level financial success.

Heather is also the founder and leader of the Highly Sensitive Entrepreneur® movement.

For more about Heather Dominick visit her website.

Contact Info for Heather Dominick

Web address: www.businessmiracles.com

Travels from: New York, NY

Social Media Links:

Resources Mentioned During the Interview

[yuzo_related]

193: The Go-Giver – Featured Interview with Bob Burg

Bob Burg, Speaker, Bestselling Author

Bill Ringle and Bob Burg discuss what it means to be a Go-Giver Influencer.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top Take-Aways from this Interview

  • What it means to be a Go-Giver. 
  • The difference between intrinsic and extrinsic value
  • Why it’s so important for salespeople to be in control of their emotions 
  • The five elements of value 
  • The right way to develop a mentor-protege relationship

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Subscribe to My Quest for the Best on Your Favorite App

Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

Bob Burg is a sought-after speaker at company leadership and sales conferences on topics at the core of the Go-Giver books. A former television personality and top-producing salesperson, Bob has shared the platform with some of today’s top business leaders, broadcast personalities, coaches, athletes, and political leaders, including a former U.S. president.

In addition to coauthoring the bestselling Go-Giver books with John David Mann, Bob has authored a number of popular books, including the critically acclaimed, Endless Referrals: Network Your Everyday Contacts Into Sales and Adversaries into Allies. His total book sales are well over a million copies.

The American Management Association named Bob one of the 30 Most Influential Leaders and he is one of Inc.’s 100 Great Leadership Speakers. Richtopia named him one of the Top 200 Most Influential Authors in the World.

Bob is an advocate, supporter, and defender of the free enterprise system and believes that the amount of money one makes is directly proportional to how many people one serves. He is also an unapologetic animal fanatic, and served on the board of directors of Furry Friends Adoption & Clinic in his hometown of Jupiter, Florida. For more information, articles and free resources, please visit www.burg.com.

Contact Info for Bob Burg


Web address: www.burg.com

Travels from: Jupiter, Florida

Social Media Links

Books Authored by the Guest

     

190: The Membership Economy – Interview with Robbie Kellman Baxter

Robbie Kellman Baxter, Author, Founder of Peninsula Strategies

Robbie Kellman Baxter and Bill Ringle discuss how small business leaders can take advantage of the membership economy to find their superusers, master the forever transaction, and build recurring revenue.

>>> Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top Take-Aways from this Interview

  • How a college networking connection led to being hired to consult at Netflix
  • The key question to ask when designing a membership offer
  • How to position your membership offer to take advantage of the low-hanging fruit, modeled after how Tony Robbins built his thought leadership empire

Tweet-Ready Insights from this Episode

Interview Insights

Read the Show Notes from this Episode

Subscribe to My Quest for the Best on Your Favorite App

Click to listen and subscribe on your favorite place to enjoy podcasts below so you are the first to know when a new episode is released. My Quest for the Best is the podcast where ambitious small business leaders discover strategies and tactics to unlock their growth potential.

Give us a 5-star rating and positive review to make it easier for other small business owners to find and benefit from our work!

Expert Bio 

Robbie Kellman Baxter brings over twenty years of strategy consulting and marketing expertise to Peninsula Strategies, a strategy consulting firm focused on helping companies leverage subscription pricing, digital community and freemium to build deeper relationships with customers. Her clients have included start-ups and mid-sized venture-backed companies as well as industry leaders such as Netflix, Oracle, Electronic Arts and eBay.

A sought-after writer and keynote speaker, Robbie has presented to alumni organizations at Stanford, Harvard and Haas, associations including the AICPA, the American Society of Association Executives, and the National Restaurant Association and organizations including the Wall Street Journal, and Coursera. She has been quoted on business issues in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and Consumer Reports, and has had pieces published in HBR.org, CNN.com, Associations Now and the Journal for Quality & Participation. Robbie has created and starred in eight video courses in collaboration with LinkedIn Learning on business topics ranging from innovation to customer success and membership. Robbie is also on the board of Amava, an organization dedicated to helping people stay active and engaged post-career.

As the author of The Membership Economy: Find Your Superusers, Master the Forever Transaction & Build Recurring Revenue, a book that has been named a top 5 Marketing Book of the Year by Inc.com, Robbie coined the popular business term “Membership Economy”, which is now being used by organizations and journalists around the country and beyond. Robbie’s expertise with companies in the emerging Membership Economy extends to include SaaS, media, consumer products and community organizations.

Prior to launching Peninsula Strategies, Robbie was a strategy consultant at Booz-Allen, a New York City Urban Fellow and a Silicon Valley product marketer. Robbie received her MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and graduated with honors from Harvard College.

 For more information, visit Robbie Kellman Baxter's website.

Contact Info for Robbie Kellman Baxter


Web address: https://peninsulastrategies.com/

Travels from: Menlo Park, Ca

Social Media Links

Books Authored by the Guest

188: Shift Ahead – Interview with Allen Adamson

Co-Founder of Metaforce.co

Allen Adamson talks with Bill Ringle about how small business owners can shift ahead and outsmart the problems that might limit, restrict, or confine the growth of your business.

Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Key Insights from this Interview 
  • The 7 Red Flags that mean a company is becoming less relevant
  • Why it’s so essential to transform your brand into an experience 
  • The story of Central Park and how they divided tasks to assign accountability to the conservancy rangers.
  • The importance of zooming out when it comes to increasing social media engagement.
  • What Jerry Seinfeld can teach us about being more observant

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:44 Allen recounts his experience interviewing with an ad agency immediately following graduation.

3:19 “Marketing is about making your products or service relevant in a rapidly changing world, and if you have no clue what’s going on in the world, you’re not going to be very good at marketing.”

4:11 What Allen reads and listens to in order to stay relevant. “Part of staying current is staying out of your desk.”

4:46 “I always look for clients that are facing challenges that don’t have any easy answer.”

6:39 “If you just really try to watch your customer and observe what’s going on, you’ll be a step ahead.”

7:10 Why you should be more like Jerry Seinfeld.

9:05 “If you just do what you did yesterday, [you’re] going to become less relevant.”

9:50 Why being myopic is the biggest red flag for your business.

10:58 The importance of paying attention to alternatives.

12:09 “A big problem for a business that has become irrelevant is pointing at the other guy.”

14:19 The story of Katz’s Deli and what they did to stay relevant.

15:32 “Sometimes luck matters.”

18:17 The story of the National Geographic Boats. “Instead of just taking a cruise to Alaska, you could take a cruise on National Geographic Boats…you’re living a National Geographic Experience.”

19:14 Why you should make your brand an experience.

20:22 “Everyone can provide a little extra to make their customers’ experience really unexpected. If it’s unexpected people will share it.”

21:11 The importance of zooming out when it comes to increasing social media engagement.

22:26 The story of Central Park and how they divided tasks to assign accountability to the conservancy rangers.

23:37 “If you can get your employees to own the problem or own the business totally with you…you’ll be far better off.”

23:59 “No one ever washes a rental car.”

24:21 The Lightning Round

Expert Bio

Allen Adamson is a noted industry expert in all disciplines of branding. He is Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Metaforce.co and the author of BrandSimple, BrandDigital, The Edge: 50 Tips from Brands That Lead, and Shift Ahead: How the Best Companies Stay Relevant in a Fast Changing World. Prior to Metaforce, Allen was Chairman, North America of Landor Associates, a global branding firm.

More information can be found on the Shift Ahead website: www.shiftaheadbook.com

For more information, visit Allen Adamson’s website.

Contact Info for Allen Adamson

Web address: https://www.metaforce.co/

Travels from: Scarsdale, NY

Phone: (914) 806-6647

Contact:

Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Allen Adamson:

     

187: How Women Rise – Interview with Sally Helgesen

Internationally Acclaimed Speaker, Leadership Consultant, and Bestselling Author

Sally Helgesen and Bill Ringle discuss how women rise in business settings by finding their voice and engaging their power.

Visit MyQuestforTheBest.com for complete show notes and more expert advice and inspiring stories to propel your small business growth.

Top takeaways from this interview:

  • Habits are behaviors you can control, so focus on making concrete changes that make a difference in how people treat you.
  • The 4-part change process explained so that it is no longer a mystery or secret. Women and men who lead at work benefit from knowing these steps.
  • By enlisting the help of your colleagues and friends, you benefit from their support, feedback, and upgraded perception of you.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:25 “I was inspired by the nuns of the school I went to.”

3:29 How one particular nun, sister Mary Lawrence

4:52 “These days my work is inspired by the women and increasingly the men in the audiences that I speak to.”

5:59 Why people hire Sally to speak. “Number 1 they’re struggling to develop their women leaders so they can move into much more senior positions…”

7:10 “I think there’s ever more recognition that engagement is key.”

7:39 On the global employee engagement survey. “What they discovered was that not just did people feel engaged or disengaged, they based on whether or not their voice was heard or actively heard by their immediate supervisor.”

8:15 “Engagement is correlated to safety. “

8:31 “What they needed to adopt into their culture was the ability to translate the message that employee engagement and inclusion were important down from the most senior level, where there was big buy-in about it, to the level of supervisory or on-site.”

9:52 “The most powerful way to create a career path that is satisfying, engaging, and rewarding and sustainable over time is to look at what you can control, what lies within your control. What lies within your control is going to be your own habits and behavior.”

10:40 “It’s very common that behaviors that serve you well early in your career can restrict you later on.”

12:50 “Women are often, for very good reasons, reluctant to use the “I” voice when claiming their achievements. Women can be proactively trying to ward off the charge of being ambitious, aggressive, or ‘all about myself’ for things that men would never be tagged as overambitious for saying.”

15:35 How to articulate the exact skills of what you brought to the table, rather than deflecting the credit to avoid looking overambitious.

17:26 The Change template 

17:46 The Change template Step 1 – “Start with one behavior that you can clearly begin to address.”

17:49 The Change template Step 2 – “Enlist other people as allies.”

18:41 The Change template Step  3 – “Let go of self-judgment.”

20:13 “I’ve been doing this for 30 years and I’ve never heard anyone say ‘I work for a perfectionistic boss and I love it.’”

21:40 “Leading your organization and leading it well gives you a platform for being a leader in your industry or sector or in your community as well.”

22:33 “Putting yourself out there and testing your own ultimate capacity for exerting leadership in a variety of venues is always going to be a benefit to you as a leader.”

23:46 Why you shouldn’t expect people to spontaneously acknowledge and reward your contributions, and how this applies to STEM fields.

27:39 How men can become more aware of some of the habits that do get in women’s ways.

29:13 The importance of honest and solicited feedback in an organization.

31:31 The Lightning Round

Expert Bio

Sally Helgesen has been named by Forbes as the world’s premier expert on women’s leadership and by Leadership Excellence magazine as one of the top 50 authorities on leadership in organizations. For the last thirty years, she has helped women leaders around the world to recognize, articulate and act on their greatest strengths and worked with organizations seeking to build more inclusive cultures.

Sally discusses topics from her most recent book, How Women Rise: Break the 12 Habits Holding You Back from Your Next Raise, Promotion, or Job, co-authored with #1 ranked executive coach Marshall Goldsmith, examines the behaviors most likely to get in the way of successful women. It became the top-selling title in its field within a week of publication.

Sally brings a global perspective, having delivered leadership programs for clients around the world including Chevron, Google, IBM, BHP Billiton Melbourne, Mellon Bank, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, The World Bank, The West Point Military Academy, Roschier LLP Helsinki, ING Amsterdam, HP Asia Pacific, The Distributed Education Network Oslo, and the Women’s Leadership Forum of Kuala Lumpur. She has consulted with the United Nations Development Program on building more inclusive country offices in Africa and Asia, led seminars at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and been visiting scholar at Northwestern University, U-Nordic Stockholm, and the Lauriston Institute AU. A contributing editor to Strategy+Business magazine and a member of the International Women’s Forum, Sally Helgesen lives in Chatham NY.

For more information, visit Sally’s website.

Contact Info for Sally Helgesen

Web address: SallyHelgesen.com

Travels From: New York, NY

Follow Sally:

Twitter  linkedin icon

Books by Sally Helgesen

  

186: Rebel Talent – Featured Interview with Francesca Gino

Professor, Harvard Business School

Francesca Gino and Bill Ringle discuss Rebel Talent – what it is and how to cultivate it to achieve greater success in your small business.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • Those with Rebel Talent aren’t just the troublemakers and show-offs. Rebelliousness has real advantages in business.
  • The 5 talents that comprise Rebel Talent: curiosity, perspective, diversity, authenticity, and engagement.
  • How Rebel Talents build on their strengths to create a stronger business

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:10 How Francesca’s dad inspired her to work hard, made sure that she engaged deeply with whatever she was studying, and taught her the importance of travel.

3:08 “I’ve always been fascinated by our human nature.”

3:35 “I began to look at breaking rules in a way that was constructive rather than destructive.”

4:26 How a non-traditional recipe book inspired her to create a non-conventional book of her own. She would later use the chef as a case study.

7:01 “Whenever we do case studies, we usually visit the business and have interviews right there in the city where the business is, but instead of just an interview, they put me to work.”

8:53 “For many people, despite the fact that they spend a lot of time at work, work is not a source of inspiration.”

9:50 “Rebelliousness has a lot of advantages for businesses.”

9:56 “We tend to think about rebels the wrong way.”

10:50 The story of a family who ate at the Michelin starred restaurant and what the chef did to appease the two smallest boys seated at the table.

12:41 “Rebels are those who break rules, whether for the constructiveness of destructiveness of the business.”

13:08 The 8 qualities of a rebel.

14:10 “Being a rebel means really being committed to adopting certain behaviors and talents.”

15:18 Why it’s remarkable for a chef to put on his coat and go out to clean the streets.

15:47 “Leaders who really are rebellious are those who also tend to be contagious because they’re modeling the behaviors for others.”

16:57 What a Tennessee/West Virginia fast food restaurant does to make their employees experts at their stations.

17:15 Why it was important for Francesca’s study to be multi-industry.

18:32 “Revealing yourself and reflecting is all about is focusing on strengths instead, and really finding opportunities to be authentic, and that sometimes means making ourselves vulnerable.”

21:24 “By being rebellious, or by being a curious leader you are showing the right behaviors for others.”

Expert Bio

Francesca Gino is an award-winning researcher and teacher, and a tenured professor at Harvard Business School. Her consulting and speaking clients include Bacardi, Akamai, Disney, Goldman Sachs, Honeywell, Novartis, P&G, and the U.S. Air Force, Army, and Navy. She has been honored as one of the world’s Top 40 Business Professors under 40 and one of the world’s 50 most influential management thinkers. Her work has been featured on CNN and NPR, as well as in the Economist, Financial Times, New York Times, Newsweek, Scientific American, and Psychology Today.

For more information, visit Francesca’s website.

Contact Info for Francesca Gino

Web address: https://www.rebeltalents.org/

Travels from: Cambridge, MA

Phone:(617) 792-1186

Contact:

LinkedIn Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Francesca Gino:

Take the Rebel Test 

183: The Road to Excellence: Featured Interview with David Mattson

President and CEO of the Sandler Organization

Bill Ringle and Dave Mattson discuss some of the crucial blind spots to building a successful business, as well as the 6 phases of the Excellence Process: Planning, Positions, People, Processes, Performetrics, Passion.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • Growth is continuous, so training to succeed should also be continuous
  • You have to become comfortable talking about money to reach higher levels of success as a small business owner
  • Surprising how many companies fail to take advantage of creating an onboarding playbook for success and the many forms it can take
  • How a sales manager can successfully link an employee’s personal and corporate goals
  • The 6 P’s in the Excellence Process

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:14 How his grandfather inspired Dave to have a strong work ethic.

3:55 “I came from a family of non-sales people.”

5:26 The importance of putting your own personality into sales.

5:39 How Dave started working with David Sandler.

7:09 Characteristics of entrepreneurs who need outside help

8:04 Why it’s essential for a team of sales people to use the same sales language.

9:54 How to recognize when you have a blind spot and what to do about it.

10:30 “Being an entrepreneur, it’s a lonely business.”

11:10 “People will work harder for themselves than they will for you.”

12:06 “In order to link the corporate goal to the personal goal, you should sit down and have a conversation that would look something like this.”

14:09 “Do you know the top 2 or 3 goals for the people who work for you? If not, you have a blind spot.”

15:21 “If you’re working on the business it’s really tough to work on the business.”

15:45 How having best practices allows your employees to mimic success.

17:06 “If someone’s stepping into that role, i want them to produce at the same level as the person who’s leaving that role.”

17:17 The 6 “P’s” in the excellence process.

18:19 “Where I want to be then affects where the company will be.”

22:12 How to set up your company’s practices so that if the leader or a pivotal employee leaves, the company isn’t paralyzed.

24:31 The Lightning Round

Expert Bio

David Mattson is the CEO and President of Sandler Training, an international training and consulting organization headquartered in North America. Since 1986, he has been a trainer and business consultant for management, sales, interpersonal communication, corporate team building and strategic planning throughout the United States and Europe. A Wall Street Journal bestselling author, his new book is The Road To Excellence: 6 Leadership Strategies To Build a Bulletproof Business.

For more information, visit David Mattson’s website.

Contact Info for David Mattson

Web address: https://www.sandler.com/about/our-story/dave-mattson

Travels from: Owning Mills, MD (Baltimore area)

Phone: 410-653-1993

Contact:

LinkedIn Twitter

Resources Mentioned by David Mattson:

Redeem Your Sandler Class Crash Offer: 

Click here to redeem your complimentary sales class with the Sandler Corporation!

Just message a nearby Sandler Training Center and say “I listened to Dave and Bill on the My Quest for the Best podcast, and I want to crash a class!”

Thanks so much for this generous offer, Dave!

  

Dr. Ron Stotts

170: Overscheduled by Success – Featured Interview with Dr. Ron Stotts

Author of Overscheduled by Success

Dr. Ron Stotts talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about how very successful leaders recognize the Hero’s Journey and make internal adjustments to create outstanding external results.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • How Ron started his inner journey after leaving the Marines and seeking to make sense of the dozens of basic training buddies who never returned from Vietnam
  • An explanation of why it is so important to leave your comfort zone in order to grow as a person, and how staying stuck in your comfort zone limits your ability to make effective decisions for your business and your team
  • What your “big mind” is and how to find it.
  • Overcoming old limitations
  • Ron’s morning routine that helps him stay present with his celebrity clients

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:32 How Ron went from being a Marine to following his inward journey. “I found I had to let go of all my training to be an all American boy was taking me.”

4:47 Details of Joseph Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey,” on leaving the comfort zone.

5:37 “I realized that comfort zone wasn’t comfortable for me any longer.”

6:08 “The hero’s journey is about taking your life up to the next level.”

6:59 How childhood experience affects the way humans act as adults, especially in regards to their choices and relationships.

7:36 Why people should “quit chasing the symptoms.” Symptoms are indicators of an opportunity to grow.

9:58 How Ron helped a client overcome his communication problems, specifically those surrounding how he communicated anger.

14:35 “Change begins to happen almost immediately.”

17:05 “We are nothing but energy. That’s physics, not metaphysics.”

18:07 Why lobsters, and humans, need to take the time to “shed their shell.”

19:24 Ron describes the Big Mind. – “The quieter my mind got, the more depth I had in my life.”

22:34 How Ron used Big Mind to create a $1M Japanese Garden.

24:01 “Most people think in terms of working harder. I think in terms of accessing different parts of who we are.”

26:30 “Money is not the answer.”

27:19 The source of why people so often sabotage their life, and why when you come up against roadblocks, it’s not necessarily a bad thing.

30:08 Some changes needed aren’t big changes, but small changes, that will make all the difference.

31:11 Ron’s morning routine for staying centered throughout his day.

Expert Bio

Dr. Ron Stotts was trained by some of the best in his field, with early mentors like Joseph Campbell, Buckminster Fuller, and other leaders of spiritual and personal growth. His service has evolved into working with those committed to their path and the influential leaders who have guided them along their way. While there are many who can help treat the symptoms of humanity’s deepest challenges, Ron’s unique work not only takes his clients to the deepest source of their challenges but guides them into transforming those challenges into great opportunities.

Ron lives in Santa Barbara, CA with his wife, Carol.

For more information, visit Dr. Ron Stott’s Website.

Contact Info for Dr. Ron Stotts

Web address: www.ronstotts.com

Travels from: Santa Barbara, CA

Phone:(805) 845-3881

Contact:

  

Resources Mentioned by Dr. Ron Stotts

Joseph Campbell's Hero's Journey

 

 

168: The Map Will Appear When the Car is in Motion – Featured Interview with Clay Scroggins

Author, Pastor of North Point Community Church

Clay Scroggins talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about the principles and pitfalls of how to lead when you’re not in charge.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • The risk of leading by authority or title, even when you’re the CEO, manager, coach, or parent
  • How Clay defines influence and its relationship to leadership
  • The 4 behaviors that allow anyone to lead without authority.
  • The one characteristic to develop to help others see you as a leader.
  • How to become less defensive and more open to feedback.
  • The importance of uncovering someone’s true motivation because we’re not all motivated by the same incentives
  • The relevance of the GPS message that “the map will appear when the car is in motion.”
  • When you can have time to pursue your most important objectives, without interruptions from the phone, staff, or outsiders.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

2:28 Clay explains why leadership and authority don’t always go hand in hand.

3:32 How an internship at the Georgia State House crafted Clay’s young understanding of leadership and decision making.

4:43 “When you believe that you have to be in charge in order to lead, that even when you are in charge and you try to leverage that authority to try to get people to move, it will work in the short term, but it does not work long term.”

5:09 The essence of leadership is influence. – “[Leadership is the ability to inspire people to move in order to accomplish something that they may not even realize that they want to accomplish.”

5:52 “Because leadership is influence, some people are born with more instinctual traits that give them influence.”

6:30 “What are my behaviors today that are gaining me influence? And what am I doing that’s costing influence?”

8:15 First of the four big behaviors to cultivate more influence.

8:41 “The easiest way to lead yourself is to ask others exactly where you are…You can’t get to where you wanna be unless you know exactly where you are.”

12:21 “There are things about yourself that everyone else knows, and that you probably know, but you have no clue that they are as aware as they actually are.”

14:20 Why influence is a commodity.

15:03 “Solicited feedback is always easier than unsolicited feedback.”

19:02 “What we have to [ask] as leaders, as managers, whether we’re in charge or not…is what is the incentive that’s causing them to work, what is motivating them?”

20:44 How to motivate people who are happy in their current position.

22:52  The big behaviors that cultivate influence.

23:52 “Every one of us has to bring value to what we’re working on.”

24:26 “The most dangerous enemy to not being in charge is passivity.”

26:48 How Clay rewards leadership behavior.

28:15 Why our greatest fear of taking leadership actions is fear of doing it wrong. – “The map will appear when the car is in motion.”

29:32 “A part of our role when we’re not in charge is to manage the anxiety of our boss.”

31:12 “Nothing so conclusively proves your ability to lead others as what you do on a day to day basis to lead yourself.”

32:13 Clay describes the steps he took in order to not only start, but finish the book.

33:11 Clay’s tips and tricks for staying productive and on task.

Expert Bio

Clay Scroggins is the lead pastor of North Point Community Church, providing visionary and directional leadership for all of the Alpharetta, Georgia church staff and congregation. As the original and largest campus of North Point Ministries, ranked numerous times by Outreach Magazine as the Largest Church in America, NPCC averages over 12,000 people in attendance. Working for Andy Stanley, Clay has worked his way through many organizational levels of North Point Ministries and knows all too well the difficulties of leading with influence and not authority. Clay holds a degree in Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech as well as a Master’s degree and Doctorate with an emphasis in Online Church from Dallas Theological Seminary. He lives in Forsyth County, Georgia, with his wife, Jenny, and their five children.

For more information, visit Clay Scroggins’s Website.

Contact Info for Clay Scroggins

Web address: https://clayscroggins.com/

Travels from: Alpharetta, GA

Phone: (404) 751-7117

Contact:

LinkedIn  

Resources Mentioned by Clay Scroggins:

 

165: Lessons Learned after hosting over 410 TEDx Talk Speakers – Featured Interview with Ajit George

TEDx Wilmington organizer and Certified Dream Builder™

Ajit Mathew George talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about his experience with running TEDx Wilmington and how the 410+ TEDx presentations have shaped and improved his life.
Ajit George

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:

  • How his family of engineers and doctors served as “reverse inspiration” on his entrepreneurial career path
  • The story behind becoming the TEDx Wilmington founder in 2011, which now has showcased over 627 speakers and received over 6 million YouTube views.
  • Keys to delivering a great talk in 12-18 minutes (hint: requires 50 hours of rehearsal!)
  • Background stories on two standout TEDx presentations: Actor Yvonne Orjii on why she has decided to stay a virgin, a direct contradiction to her choice in screen roles; and Yolanda Schlabach, whose 2016 talk raised the awareness of sexual trafficking along Route 95 between Washington DC and New York to the attention of the Governor of Delaware for legislative action.
  • How Ajit’s experience as a TEDx host has made him a better listener for his life coaching clients.
  • The legacy project of creating a hydroponic garden center run by former prison inmates to provide organic produce to restaurants within 200 miles of Wilmington.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:51 Ajit tells about growing up in a family where all his cousins were either engineers or doctors and how it made him want to do the opposite. “I wanted to not take a safe route.”

2:50 Ajit recounts the four years he spent in India as a youth working in a children’s league, and how a key leader in the league helped develop his organizational skills.

4:08 “It’s ok to fail…and recovering from failure is almost as important as failing.”

5:33 How Ajit became involved with TED and TEDx

7:00 Ajit gives tips on how to put together a TEDx talk.

7:07 “People feel the need to put everything they know into a talk, which is a huge mistake.”

7:31 “What is that one idea worth spreading?”

9:15 [How to resist the urge to condense multiple ideas] – “Write down every idea [you] want to share in a TEDx talk, it doesn’t matter whether it’s one talk or multiple talks. Once [you] write it down on a sheet of paper, I then say, ‘What is the one idea of all those ideas on the sheet of paper you want to share with the world if you never got an opportunity to do a second TEDx talk?’”

10:09 “[TEDx Wilmington] no longer let anyone come without a lot of rehearsal…It’s a very conscious, determined process that we have.”

11:14 [Ajit explains why TEDx talks don’t allow notes] – “A good TEDx talk takes at least 50 hours of rehearsal.”

13:26 Ajit describes the organizational challenges of running TEDx.

15:02 What makes a fascinating TED talk.

17:12 “Often what we try to do is give a global platform to people who have great messages, but who are not getting them across.”

19:05 What it means to be a good life coach.

19:15 “You can only show them how to walk and give them the directions.”

20:33 “It’s much harder to get people to gracefully surrender something that they passionately believe in.” 

21:00 Ajit tells about his upcoming project Second Chances Farm, an organic farm where individuals recently released from prison will have a place to get back on their feet, and the goals he has for its development.

24:43 How Ajit became involved with doing work with Wilmington prisons through the organization Breaking Bread Behind Bars.

25:52 [On hiring individuals recently released from prison] – “There’s a huge shortage of labor force in the United States right now.”

27:50 [The importance of prioritization] – “The key is remembering that there’s no such thing as multi-tasking…so at the end of the day you have to decide if you make a list of 25 things, what’s the one thing that you must do today?”

Expert Bio

Ajit Mathew George is a TEDx organizer, certified Dream Builder™ Life Coach, creative marketer, serial entrepreneur, philanthropist, gastronaut, wine aficionado, and dream catcher who divides his time between Wilmington, Delaware and Virgin Gorda, British Virgin Islands. He has over 40 years of experience in creative marketing, strategic planning, and business development in many different areas ranging from broadcasting, non-profits, resorts, and real estate development.

Through Magic Dust, LLC, he helps organizations and individuals build their dreams, accelerate their results, and create richer, more fulfilling lives through Life Coaching, strategic marketing, and event planning. Over the years, Ajit has sprinkled his “magic dust” to create some magical events such as First Night Wilmington, Meals From the Masters Celebrity Chef’s Brunch, Evening With The Masters, Cellar Masters Wine Auction, Evening of Style, Black Tie Monopoly Tournament, Virgin Islands Winemakers Dinners, MidAtlantic Wine + Food Festival and TEDxWilmington.

As the organizer and executive producer of TEDxWilmington (www.tedxwilmington.com) Ajit organized six annual TEDxWilmington Conferences, the 2018 TEDxWilmingtonED Conference, the 2016 and 2017 TEDxWilmingtonWomen Conference, 2017 TEDxYouth@Wilmington and 18 TEDxWilmingtonSalons between 2014 and 2017 including a very special TEDx Salon inside a prison in July 2015. These 29 different TEDx events featuring 397 speakers from around the world who gave 375 TEDx talks. As of March 5, 2018, the TEDx talks given at TEDxWilmington had over 6.351.709 views on YouTube.

Ajit is the Chairman of the American Wine Society’s First State Wine Guild. He was also the founder of the MidAtlantic Wine+ Food Festival that in 2015 consisted of a series of 33 acclaimed food and wine events in 4 states over 4 days featuring 60 chefs + 23 winemakers from 6 continents. He organized this annual Wine + Food Festival for 4 years.

Ajit is the founder of Second Chances Farm LLC, which is creating an organic vertical farm in Wilmington, Delaware that will exclusively hire people re-entering society after completing their prison sentence.

For more information, visit Ajit Mathew George’s website.

Contact Info for Ajit Mathew George

Web address: http://www.tedxwilmington.com/

Travels from: Wilmington, Delaware

Phone: (302) 521-9769

Contact:

LinkedIn  Twitter 

Resources Mentioned by Ajit Mathew George:

TEDx Wilmington

Second Chances

TEDx Videos Mentioned

Sex Trafficking in the U.S.: Young Lives, Insane Profit | Yolanda Schlabach | TEDxWilmington

The wait is sexy | Yvonne Orji | TEDxWilmingtonSalon

 

 

162: Scuba Tanks and Fierce Conversations – Featured Interview with Susan Scott

Founder of Fierce, Inc., Author of Fierce Conversations and Fierce Leadership

Susan Scott talks to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about fierce leadership and the benefits of learning how to have truly meaningful conversations.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • What is the real role of managers
  • Why leaders should offer their employees to challenge the way they’re thinking.
  • How meaningful conversation occurs in a culture where candor is valued.
  • How “putting on a scuba tank” can keep your meetings from being a waste of time.
  • Why practice can make you a better communicator

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:39 Scott talks about an early role model – her grandmother – the first to start the Tuxedo rental business.

2:07 [On starting Fierce] – “I had been running groups of CEO’s here in Seattle…and I would meet with each of them once a month for about 2 hours.”

2:45 [Inspired by Hemingway] “I had an epiphany that our companies and our careers and our relationships and our lives can succeed or fail, gradually hen suddenly, one conversation at a time.” 

3:08 “What gets talked about within a company, how it gets talked about, and who is invited to the conversation, determines what’s going to happen.”

4:22 [Paraphrasing Annie Dillard] – “How we spend our days is how we spend our lives.”

4:29 “Most leaders are spending their days in meeting after meeting after meeting, conversation after conversation after conversation.”

5:23 The importance of straight talk and straight listening.

5:38 “People are understandably frightened to disclose what they’re really thinking and feeling, and they don’t necessarily want to go for the biggest and baddest and toughest and most complicated issues.”

5:59 “People end up waterskiing through their conversations rather than putting on a scuba tank and going deeper.”

7:14 “Fierce Leadership is the book that if somebody’s going to read one book, they should read that one.”

7:57 [On making the conversation real] – “You have to decide whether or not you really care about the issues on the table. If you don’t care, then you’re not necessarily going to come out from behind yourself and be real.”

8:22 “I would hope that you are in a culture where candid candor is valued.”

8:31 “No plan will survive its collision with reality.”

9:31 “The person who’s holding the meeting fills that form before everyone comes together for the meeting.”

10:21 “A leader’s job is not to be right, a leader’s job is to get it right for the company.”

10:38 “If I’m the leader, I want to start by changing the way I’m holding my meetings.”

11:31 “There’s an easy and graceful way to put your perspective on the table even if it contradicts the leaders of the organization.”

12:14 “Most people aren’t even aware that they’re shutting people down.”

13:05 “In our training nobody does any role play, nobody pretends to be someone other than who they are.”

14:29 How practice can make you a better communicator.

14:51 “We teach people what accountability really is and how to raise the bar on accountability.”

16:05 How a meeting facilitator can help keep a meeting from derailing.

16:31 “We want the client to have gotten tremendous benefit from the training and actually make progress on an issue that is of great importance to them.”

17:12 People always amaze me at how brave, courageous, and skillful they can be very quickly, given the right tools and understanding of what’s at stake.”

17:59 “What is your role as a manager? It is not to have all of the answers, it is not to create the plan all by yourself.”

18:42 “If I as a manager am always just dictating to them what they should do, and sharing the brilliance of my own thinking with them, there’s not much room for them to shine. Plus, I am not always going to get it right.”

20:13 [On Managers changing mindset] – “Why would I want to go back to that lonely role of coming up with all of these ideas myself, when I’ve got some amazing people who came up with ideas is a short amount of time?”

22:05 “When everybody knows, and you tell them at the beginning ‘Before we conclude I’m going to ask every one of you to give me your best advice,’ when you do that, no one is going to be checking out.”

23:08 “If you haven’t heard from somebody in the meeting you call on them.”

23:38 “You teach people how to behave in these meetings and no one gets to hide out and shrink their subatomic particles and vanish off the radar screen. They’re invited to the meeting because their perspective is important.”

25:24 [Paraphrasing Will Rogers] – “Politicians are good at saying absolutely nothing and saying it all the time. Nobody’s listening and then everybody disagrees,”

26:43 Ask more questions, respond with fewer ‘Yes, but’s,” especially in regards to political discussions.

29:44 “Labelling people or groups of people is so counterproductive.”

30:30 “People are tired of having these 360 anonymous inputs…people want to have conversations.”

30:53 “Companies are shifting their performance management to be this ongoing conversation.”

31:00 The two major updates to Fierce Conversations

33:04 [On feedback] – “The time has come, we all know that we need it.”

33:36 “Let’s get away from the practice of holding people accountable and holding people able and modeling accountability.”

34:09 “Be very clear with people on what are their deliverables.”

34:44 “There’s no way I can hold you to a standard that is higher than the one I’m exhibiting myself.”

34:54 “Accountability is an attitude.”

35:03 “You have to create an environment in which people choose accountability.”

36:08 Feedback Scott has received from readers.

37:23 “You wasn’t people to come up with their own insights.”

38:59 [On fierce conversations] – “It’s one where we lean in, we really listen to one another, we totally disclose what we’re thinking, we share the goal of getting it right.

39:17 Five questions with Susan Scott

Expert Bio

Susan Scott is a best-selling author and leadership development architect who has enabled top executives worldwide to engage in vibrant dialogue with one another, with their employees, and with their customers for more than two decades. As CEO of Fierce Conversation, a company she founded in 2001, Susan sets the company’s strategic vision and creates the culture through her ongoing commitment to ensure employees are engaged, communication is candid, and learning is continuous.

Prior to starting Fierce, Susan spent 12 years running think tanks for CEOs designing and delivering training to peers working with CEOs across the globe. In 2002, ‘Fierce Conversations -Achieving Success at Work and in Life, One Conversation at a Time,’ was published in 4 countries. It was included on The Wall Street Journal and UPI best seller lists, and was one of USA TODAY’S top 40 business books of 2002. Her much anticipated second book – ‘Fierce Leadership: A Bold Alternative to the Worst ‘Best’ Practices of Business Today was published in 2009, and was also listed on The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times best seller lists. In May 2017 Susan re-released “Fierce Conversations” with 40% updated content, incorporating more data and technology that was developed through her experience in the industry over the last 15 years.

For more information, visit Susan Scott’s website.

Contact Info for Susan Scott

Web address: www.fierceinc.com

Travels from: Seattle, WA

Phone: (206) 818-2429

Contact: Sarah Mann

LinkedIn Facebook Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Susan Scott:

 

Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises

Henry David Thoreau’s Walden

Annie Dillard

Will Rogers

161: Sell with Authority – Interview with Mike Saunders

Positioning Authority Coach at Marketing Huddle

Authority Positioning Coach Mike Saunders talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about marketing huddles, learning from failure, and the phenomenon of creating “Done for You” assets.

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • Why strong companies don’t eliminate marketing completely when times get tough.
  • How having authority assets distinguishes you from your competitors
  • The importance of regular “marketing huddles.”
  • The biggest takeaway from failure.
  • What it means to have Authority Positioning.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:12 How the 2008 economic crisis was the impetus for Saunders to get his MBA in Marketing, and eventually form his marketing firm Marketing Huddle.

2:00 [On keeping the marketing budget in tough times] – “They would keep that momentum going knowing that their competitors were cutting back and they would gain that market share.”

2:05 “For the last 9 years I’ve focused on helping small business owners, entrepreneurs, consultants with their marketing with some real cutting edge marketing strategy.”

2:30 How Authority Positioning will grant you the distance you need between you and your competitors.

3:19 [On the term Huddle] – “A lot of times in business consulting you’ll see them recommend ‘Do a daily huddle, do a weekly huddle, get your team to come together to talk about what’s working, what’s not.”

5:05 [On Daymond John] – “He wants to see the people who have failed so he can learn from the failures.”

5:13 “Most of the time you hear that phrase, you win or you…and people are like ‘yeah yeah yeah, lose, win or you lose!’ No, you win or your learn.”

5:40 “If it doesn’t turn out the way you want it, take those lessons, move on to the next iteration of that plan and move on to build from that.”

6:40 You have to be wired to be an entrepreneur, otherwise you’ll run for the hills at the first setback.

7:20 “You need to have the strategy before the tactics because if you just start throwing tactics out there without a strategy then you’re really going in multiple directions.”

7:40 Points out the importance of Steven Covey’s phrase, “Begin with the end in mind.”

8:16 [The biggest takeaway] – “Maybe there was a small level of success, well let’s just do it again but do it a tiny bit better, or a little bit longer, or align with the right strategic alliances.”

8:55 “I don’t think anyone starts a business and has this consistent trajectory upward, there’s going to be those ups and downs.”

9:41 “The problem came where I was trying to be too many things to too many types of people, and I was never an expert in one specific thing.”

10:16 [On Writing Authority Selling] – “Everybody’s doing good content on social media, good content on a blog post, but not many people are out there writing a book.”

11:43 How writing his first book on business social media led him to find more opportunities.

11:57 “It was at that point I realized that if I had just given a two minute elevator speech about how people should do social media differently, it would’ve gone in one ear and out the other.”

13:32 [On being an influencer] – “We don’t have superstar celebrity movie star status, but guess what we do have. We have a message and we have some expertise that we are really good at in what we do for our customers and our clients.”

14:05 “A marketing consultant does a lot of things, but an authority positioning coach, now that’s interesting, how can that help me?”

14:30 “We all are selling, but when you can sell from the position of expertise and authority, your ideas will land that much better.”

15:50 “Having a position of authority helps you to sell or promote your business and your ideas from a whole different mindset than your competitors.”

17:21 How a graphic designer used Saunder’s Authority Positioning Model to differentiate himself. “I helped him become an Amazon bestselling author without writing a word.”

18:41 The importance of having long term authority positioning assets.

19:26 “Your prospects are googling your name and your brand, because maybe they were introduced to your name by a friend.”

21:59 “The ‘done for you’ model is so viable because people these days want something done for them, handed to them, and quickly without a lot of hassle.”

23:40 “There’s a disconnect between your head and your hands.”

25:16 [On establishing authority positioning] – “You gotta start small.”

27:00 5 Question Round

30:55 “Building your authority is your number 1 priority.”

Expert Bio

As the Authority Positioning Coach, I help entrepreneurs break out of obscurity by amplifying their hidden expertise to a position of status & prestige to become THE go-to Authority & Expert in their industry. The Authority Positioning Coach is a Boutique Marketing Agency providing “Done-for-You” Authority Positioning Packages to elevate your brand to a position of status and prestige.

I am the author of Amazon Bestselling book, Authority Selling™, contributor to The Huffington Post, Adjunct Marketing Professor at several Universities and member of the Forbes Coaches Council – an invitation-only community for the World’s Most Influential Business Coaches.

For more information on Mike Saunders, visit Marketing Huddle. 

Contact Info for Mike Saunders

Web address: http://www.marketinghuddle.com/

Travels from: Arvada, CO

        Phone: (720) 232-3112

Connect on Social Media:

LinkedIn Twitter YouTube

Resources Mentioned by Mike Saunders:

 

Daymond John 

Stephen Covey

Seth Godin

154: Better Leaders Equal a Better World – Featured Interview with Courtney Lynch

 

New York Times Bestselling Author, Keynote Speaker, and Leadership Expert

Courtney Lynch talks with Bill Ringle about how each of us can become better leaders and create a better world on My Quest for the Best.

 

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • How integrating leadership development for women allowed Walmart to solve problems at the store level
  • The common challenges that arise from people working together: conflicts or power struggles that need to be resolved; miscommunication around expectations, scheduling, and style; and much more
  • Tips for achieving human connection even when you’re working remotely
  • How to use feedback to be an inspiring leader instead of an alienating leader
  • What it means when high performance teams have the courage for candor

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:02 Lynch tells about how her experiences with the United States Marine Corps shaped her abilities as a leader.

2:48 “I’m not someone who would’ve been able to afford going to graduated school, but thanks to my military service – the GI Bill is a fantastic vehicle – and so I went to law school after my time in uniform, and through the opportunity was able to enter the profession as a full-fledged attorney.”

3:26 Lynch describes how working in the law firm wasn’t the kind of work that she found fulfilling.

4:05 [On creating the startup with Angie Morgan] – “Our firm’s 14 years old, but I still remember the startup days like they were yesterday…there’s a lot of vision, a lot of ambition and that phase of a business. You’re motivated to work hard, and you know you want to add value and you want to have a positive impact.”

4:35 [On having Walmart as a first customer] – “When you’re a tiny little startup and Fortune1 becomes your first customer, you learn a lot quickly.”

5:02 “We didn’t have a strong platform to stand on, but we were incredibly passionate about what we had to offer.”

5:54 [On getting Walmart as a client] – “Walmart was a cold call, but it was an informed cold call.”

6:21 “I realized that the problems Walmart had, the challenges Walmart had…when you’re such a big organization, you’re a cross section of society, just like the Marine Corps…so my thinking was, if they had leadership development experiences, especially for their female employees, problems could be caught at the store level.”

7:06 “We just happened to connect with someone inside their diversity department whose father had served in the Marine Corps and really understood the practical value of leadership development for making any work force better.”

7:54 “I say it’s kudos to Walmart rather than kudos to us for investing in a small, women-owned business.”

8:16 [On why clients contact them] – “It’s people right? Anytime there’s 2, 3, of or more people working together, there’s bound to be friction.”

8:28 “We hear consistent challenges. How do we adopt a better strategy? How do we empower employees? How do we work in a virtual environment? How do we hold people accountable?”

8:41 “The joy of our work is that we get to work across all industries, all verticles, because people are people everywhere they go.”

8:50 [On why organizations contact them] – “Organizations are typically having a pain point, and people not working together as efficiently or as effectively as they could, is what seems to be at the root of it, or, the opposite side is the client or companies experiencing a tremendous amount of success, and they’re having to scale very quickly.”

9:18 “We usually come in when things are going really tough, or when things are just going gangbusters.”

9:47 “Training and development is necessary and definitely a part of what we do, yet our clients bring us in and we integrate very deeply into their business. So everything that we do is about helping the client achieve their business goals.”

10:40 [On working with Facebook as things were moving quickly] – “It was the true pleasure of my career to see that company grow up on the inside and work with their most amazing talented professionals.”

11:30 “We work a lot in the energy industry, with a lot of engineers. “I sent the e-mail I asked for it to be done!” But really it’s about human connection.

11:47 “There’s lots of different ways to connect, and we like to help our clients see the practical ways even in a virtual environment, a fast-paced environment, or an environment of mathematicians, computer scientists, and engineers, greater human connection can happen.”

12:10 Lynch discusses the importance of maintaining spontaneous contact and agenda-less conversation.

12:34 “What can happen when we’re in a virtual world is we can get very task focused.”

13:19 Lynch describes her son’s “the practice after the practice,” noting how connection and bonding occurs in between the places where work and tasks are accomplished.

13:46 [On the inspiration for writing Spark] – “Spark is like our greatest hits album because it was really hard fought in the trenches…[Angie, Sean, and I spent thousands of hours inside the company, and it was such an exciting opportunity to be a student of the best leaders in the world.”

14:24 “Spark was written over a 5-6 year period, even though actually sitting down and writing the book only took about a year, it was those 5-6 years of learning and taking notes and working with so many different talented leaders that really led to “Hey, we learned a lot, and we want to share this so that everyone has an opportunity, everyone who picks up the book, to be a better leader.”

14:59 “Better leaders really do equal a better world, and that’s leaders at all levels.”

15:05 “Anyone has the potential to lead, and if we all just spent a little time practicing it, great things happen within our communities, and our greater world.”

15:50 “I think that our world is becoming more flat. Organizations are starting to trim the hierarchy, people have matrix relationships. So I would encourage someone who’s focused on what they don’t have, when it comes to authority or title, to shift their focus to what they do have.

16:15 Lynch explains how the best leaders guide while the worst leaders mandate and control.

16:51 Leadership is to influence and inspire other people.

17:00 “Some of the most front-line roles that we have in organizations: a front-line sales representative, a receptionist, a new account manager, a front-line invoice processor – these are the people that are making the company run, and if they demonstrate leadership behaviors, they’ll be able to influence their teams and the greater organization.”

17:55 “[Feedback] has to be delivered in a way that doesn’t disrupt ego and stability. There’s ways to give feedback well. I think that all feedback that is delivered effectively begins with a lot of accountability.

18:19 “Feedback isn’t well-received if someone is placing blame while they’re giving it.”

19:00 “There’s a fine line between feedback and complaining.”

19:24 Lynch illustrates the creative leadership model for feedback: giving feedback from a situation, behavior, and impact perspective.

21:17 “A lot of time feedback gets into a really tough place because it becomes accusatory or unduly emotional, and we need to talk about behaviors that people can change, and we need to do it in a way that sets the stage for grace and dignity.”

22:21 “I think that’s the mark of a high performing team: when you can talk about accountability.”

23:00 The four keys to being credible.

23:53 “Self-awareness is the accelerant to our leadership development. If we can anticipate our blind spots and work to take action, that’s growth and that’s where growth happens.”

24:55 The Say/Do Gap concept.

25:05 Lynch explains why leadership doesn’t only happen in the heroic moments.

25:38 “If you’ve made a commitment, are you doing everything it takes to meet those standards that you’ve set?”

26:52 Why you shouldn’t “hide the ball.”

27:23 How people who have been athletes or in athletics often make excellent leaders.

28:05 “When anyone enrolls in any professional development or any academic experience they’re saying, ‘Hey, I want to learn. I want to grow.’ And that growth mindset is highly relevant to us as professionals.”

29:07 Lynch describes a major bump in the road LeadStart faced, and the path they took to overcoming it as a team.

29:55 “Stress has a way of bringing up a lot of unproductive emotions.”

30:28 “People want to buy consulting services from the consultants, they don’t necessarily want to buy that from a third party sales professional.”

32:09 “In those earlier years we really had to ask for those referrals to get them.”

32:27 “Hope is not a strategy. We really needed to be explicit with our clients about what we needed.”

34:24 Lynch describes the differences between the company 14 years ago and the company today.

34:57 “I’m a multi-dimensional thinker. I think broadly, I like to think from a lot of different vantage points. Yet, when it comes to doing, I’m very linear.”

35:29 [On tools and tips for productivity.] – “I jot down the things I must do the next time I’m at work.”

Expert Bio

As a founding partner of Lead Star, Courtney works closely with all levels of leaders as she designs and delivers development programs designed to drive immediate results. Courtney is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling co-author of SPARK: How to Lead Yourself and Others to Greater Success and Leading from the Front, and has written numerous articles on behavior-based leadership and organizational excellence.

She’s been a guest on CNBC, FOX News, and CNN. Courtney’s efforts with Lead Star have been cited in business publications ranging from Fast Company and Inc. to The New York Times. In addition to her work with consulting clients, Courtney served as the Director of the Center for Creative Leadership’s Partner Network, convening and connecting leading consultancies with the Center’s innovative thought leadership, research and development solutions.
Prior to starting Lead Star, Courtney’s professional experiences included service as a Captain in the United States Marine Corps, an attorney at a large law firm, and a sales manager for Rational Software. She holds a law degree from William & Mary, an undergraduate degree from North Carolina State University and completed intensive studies at Cambridge University. Courtney lives with her husband and three children in Glen Allen, Virginia.

For more information on Courtney Lynch, visit the Lead Star website.

Contact Info for Courtney Lynch

Web address: www.leadstar.us

Travels from: Fairfax, VA

Phone: (703) 273-7280

Connect on Social Media:

LinkedIn Twitter YouTube YouTube

Resources Mentioned by Courtney Lynch:

152: Putting People First – Featured Interview with Jonathan Raymond

Jonathan Raymond, Owner of Refound

Jonathan Raymond talks with Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about the culture of accountability, the proper way to give feedback, and developing an organization that puts people first.

 

Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • Why organizations are putting so much thought into a “people first” culture
  • How to give feedback without micromanaging
  • How a software company gave their senior management the room to play at the level of their title
  • The one mistake organizations make over and over again
  • The importance of embracing uncertainty

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:10 Raymond recounts his first real experience in entrepreneurship, telling about the “driveway car wash’ he owned with his friends.

1:33 [On lessons learned from this early venture] – “One of the lessons was the operating costs are always higher than you think they are.”

1:50 “Any industry worth being in is crowded.”

2:15 How law school taught Raymond to show up in the world in a professional way.

2:53 “My education in law school really helped me write with some structure, rather than just stream of consciousness, but to actually put one idea after the next in a way where something builds.”

3:05 “A lawyer is able to string a series of good ideas together and build an argument, right? Which is what a good book or a good blog post is: it’s a good argument for advocating a a piece of change.”

3:45 Raymond describes what it was like working 3 jobs out of law school, and still barely being able to cover rent. 

4:04 [Paraphrasing Andy Warhol] – “You know you’re on track in your life when you’re using the best and the worst of what’s happened to you over the course of your journey.”

4:26 “If I want to have an impact in the world, I’m going to have to take some steps, and there’s going to be some painful moments along the way.”

4:52 [On Raymond’s Clients at Refound] – “I think the biggest problem we help people with, I would say, is overwhelm and ambiguity.”

4:55 “In most modern organizations, there’s a lot of thought being put into ‘How do we create a people first culture? How do we engage with employees? How do we create the conditions where people feel like they’re coming to work not just to create profit for owners and shareholders, but a sense of personal meaning.”

5:27 “What we’ve been able to do is offer a real tactical approach for how to do, in particular, feedback and accountability in an organization that really grounds the way people operate on a day to day basis.”

5:53 “Where organizations go sideways, and where things start to degrade, is in the actual conversations between managers and employees, between managers and one another, and, very importantly, between managers and senior executives.”

7:39 [Case Study Software Company in south bay, CA] – “There was this big aha moment, which is fairly common, where all of the managers in the organization [realized] how they were sort of playing a level down or two levels down from their title.”

8:26 “It’s incremental. Nothing changes overnight. Nothing worth doing changes overnight.”

9:09 “And that’s really the best part of this work for me. I get to see people take these tools and apply them in ways that I never would’ve thought, and have conversations that are meaningful to them.”

9:44 [On Raymond’s inspiration for writing the book] – “I bumped up against my own capacity as a leader, and I realized that I didn’t know what I was doing.”

10:23 How Raymond’s experience with cold, unfeeling training programs led him to create a work that was truly human.

10:26 “It’s not about being authentic, because “being authentic,” well, what does that mean? But, you know, how do you show up in a way that’s both professional and personal, that’s warm and kind and compassionate, but that also drives results?”

11:15  The type of feedback that makes people uncomfortable, and the scourge of the “Millennials boogeyman.”

11:57 [On the reluctance to new processes and change] – “People have been burned before.”

12:31 “This points to the tragedy of what’s happening right now in otherwise really interesting space in time, is that we’re radically over investing in technology to solve this problem, and radically underinvesting in training.”

12:59 [The mistake organizations make again and again] – “Buying tools and technology to solve human problems.”

13:39 Why managers are so hesitant to give feedback.

14:24 “To be able to embrace a communications methodology that says, ‘Actually, you know what, uncertainty is your best friend.’”

14:40 “If your feedback provides a solution, it’s not feedback, it’s micromanagement.”

15:12 “When we get a solution, when we get a ‘Here’s what you should do next,’ it’s quite disempowering.”

16:15 Raymond reveals some tips for managers.

16:25 “There are very few things we can do that will give us more value than not going into feedback situations cold.”

17:26 [On Accountability] – “We have to reframe what we think of when we say accountability. We can use the word, but if we don’t understand the meaning behind the word, we’re on the wrong track.”

18:07 “Accountability, all it means is responsibility for one’s actions.”

18:35 Why accountability without consequences is ineffective.

19:14 “Accountability is a gift.”

19:50 Raymond shares the layers of developing accountability in an organization.

20:25 [The key to accountability] – “The key is communication where people say, ‘You know what? I’m holding myself accountable for this, and you, Sir or Ms. Manager, I want your help.”

21:13 “We’re not very mindful as a species, we tend to be kind of reactive.”

21:35 How to “name what we feel” when giving constructive feedback.

21:58 “We can’t change behavior if we don’t know what the behavior is.”

22:33 “People will surprise you.”

22:47 “Oftentimes that’s what we need, we need boundaries. We need structure for what does excellent work look like.”

23:25 “If you get to do whatever you want, whenever you want with no consequences and no structure, you’re not really helping your teammates, you’re not really helping the organization in any directed, vision oriented way.”

23:44 “A good sales conversation has structure, it has flow – you have pieces that you want to cover; but it also has substance – it’s how you show up, and how you relate, and how you listen.”

24:49 How structure, communication, and substance go hand in hand.

25:37 “What unifies the organizations that are doing this well is participation from executives in a very specific way.”

26:10 [On the importance of recognizing where we are.] – “We’re very good at making big pronouncements of how it’s going to be in the future.”

27:14 “You actually have a lot more latitude, a lot more leeway with the people in your organization than you think.”

27:25 “You don’t have to fix the organization this afternoon. You just have to own that there are problems.”

27:49 “The frustration comes from when management and leadership tries to whitewash [problems].”

28:26 “I think it’s interesting that organizations have found themselves in this position of having to apologize for holding people accountable for being jerks.”

29:49 The problem with taking half measures.

31:12 “Don’t boast about what you’re going to do, let actions speak for themselves.”

32:05 What Raymond reads to stay on top of current trends.

33:02 The tools Raymond uses to stay productive.

Jonathan Raymond’s Bio

After twenty years of not being able to decide whether he was a business development guy or a personal growth teacher, Jonathan stopped trying to figure it out. He’s the owner of Refound, an online training startup that offers Good Authority training programs for owners, executives, and managers. He’s madly in love with his wife, tries not to spoil his daughter, and will never give up on the New York Knicks. Jonathan is the former CEO and Chief Brand Officer of eMyth, where he led the transformation of a global coaching brand and has worked in tech, clean tech, and the nonprofit world after graduating law school in 1998. He lives in Ashland, Oregon, a lovely town that’s too far away from a warm ocean.

For more information, visit Jonathan Raymond’s website.

Contact Info for Jonathan Raymond

Web address: www.refound.com

Travels from: Ashland, OR

Phone: (541) 690-5212

Contact:

LinkedIn Twitter

Resources Mentioned by Jonathan Raymond:

144: 9 Steps to a Better Bottom Line – Featured Interview with Dorriah Rogers

Founder of Paradyne Consulting Works

In this episode of My Quest for the Best, Dorriah Rogers talks with Bill Ringle about the principles and benefits described in Decide to Profit.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The impact a mentor had on Rogers’ life and career, and how he inspired her to be her own person.
  • How the Lego company used a single, unified goal to really turn things around.
  • The importance of not only giving everyone in the company or organization, not just the decision makers, a voice.
  • How to teach employees to tie their ideas to the overarching goal: making money.
  • Rogers’ 9 steps to a better bottom line.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:15: [On the mentorship of Tom Schumacher] – “[Schumacher] inspired me to be a problem-solver and a speaker, and he showed great faith in my abilities and always pushed me to be my own person.”

1:59: “I’ve never really been an employee. I’m what I call a serial entrepreneur.”

2:20: [On what it means to be your own person] – “Not being easily influenced by either peer pressure, social pressure, or any other types of pressure that may exist either in the workplace or in society.”

2:44: The 3 primary aspects of any business.

3.27: [On finding and keeping clients] – “I’ve started with a handful of people that I’ve come in contact with, and they saw what I was doing, they saw my work ethic and my reputation, and some of them gave me a chance. That’s really all it took, was getting my foot in the door.”

4:07 [Characteristics of an ideal client] – “I think one of the primary characteristics, more than anything, is openness. What I mean by openness is openness to change.”

4:36 [On client transparency] – “I’ve gone into situations where I talked to some of the key managers, and although they recognize they have a problem, they don’t recognize that they need to change. And they’re not willing to look in the mirror.”

6:30 [On asking the difficult questions] – “I may attend a meeting, and I may interrupt the meeting and say something to the leader, or maybe even the CEO or exec, and challenge them in front of the team. Saying ‘hey, why are you asking that question?’ or ‘hey, it may be a good idea for you to listen to some of the other input.’ Or perhaps, ‘We haven’t heard from Jim, let’s hear what Jim thinks.”

7:14 “I really challenge people to get outside of their own heads, to push them to think and behave differently.”

7:54 [On building trust with clients] – “Before I begin any of the real work, I will spend a lot of one on one time with the decision maker. I will get to know them as people. I will ask them a lot of questions. I will get them to what I call the comfort point. And also, I will ask their permission. I will let them know that I will ask hard questions, and get their permission to do so.”

8:55 Rogers’ Inspiration for writing Decide to Profit: The 9 Steps in a Better Bottom Line

10:40 The nine steps in a better bottom line.

12:00 [On the importance of understanding the goal] –  “A lot of people get mired in the day to day tasks and activities. And they kind of grind through their day. They have a tendency not to stay focused on the bigger picture.”

12:30 [The fundamental driving force behind the company] – “My whole purpose in writing both the book, and identifying the goal – as one of the steps, is to keep people focused on the bigger picture. And in any company, and any organization…the fundamental driving force behind the company is making money. So there’s an overarching financial goal.”

12:55 “And my idea was, have everybody within the organization tie every decision that they are making to the larger goals of the organization. Number 1 has to always be: making money.”

13:30 [On the importance of quality] – “The quality of your product, that also has to be a goal. You can’t make money and sacrifice quality, because that’s not sustainable.”

13:40 [Deciding the profit] – “Every organization can have 1, 2, or 3 goals that they are primarily focused on. And if you make sure that everyone knows what those goals are, and tie their day to day decisions to them, that’s how you can decide the profit.”

14:04 The importance of keeping day to day decision in line with organizational goals

15:10 The Lego study

16:09 [Sacred cows] – “In some of the companies that I’ve worked with, I see them hold on to business decisions, or I see them hold on to product. I even see them hold on to no-productive people. And all of this is counterintuitive, and it’s not in alignment with the overall goals of the organization.”

16:32 [On unified goals] – “[The lego study] shows how one single unified goal enabled a company to completely turn around.”

17:31 [On teams holding themselves accountable] –  “Have you ever been in a meeting where there’s a lot of discussion and a lot of ideas, and everyone leaves the meeting and 90% of the ideas and discussion has been forgotten? That’s what I experience in a lot of the companies I work with. There’s a lot of ideas, a lot of good discussion, a lot of innovative discussion, yet nobody ever captured the discussion, nobody ever circled back – there was no feedback loop, and there was no accountability.”

18:23 [On accountability] – “What makes people accountable can be something as simple as an action list. And I don’t mean minutes, I don’t mean a detailed list of who said what verbatim. I mean, a ‘we talked about this, we decided to do this, this person owns it, and this is when they’re going to get it done.’”

19:45 [On employee contribution] – “In the book I have a tool for employees to do a very straightforward return on investment analysis. One of the disconnects that I was increasingly becoming aware of is that managers would often miss ideas because they couldn’t see how that idea would benefit the organization.”

20:16  [On helping employees choose ideas that are tied to financial goals] “The benefit of the 9th step is that it provides employees a tool and a methodology to demonstrate both quantitatively and qualitatively how to give an investment to the organization and show how their idea will either improve the financial goals or other goals.”

21:38 The importance of checklists and forms for employees.

23:00 [On brainstorming] – “The people that make the decisions tend to shoot down the ideas of those that don’t make the decisions. Allowing people to free think, allowing for ideas to be equally valuable no matter who they’re coming from, is very, very important. All of the rules that I put down for brainstorming are a result of all of those rules being broken during brainstorming meeting I’ve been to.”

24:21 Rogers describes the timeline and process of writing Decide to Profit: 9 Steps to a Better Bottom Line

25:03 “The book isn’t written for specialists. The book is not meant to be a dissertation on continuous improvement or operational streamlining or productivity. It’s meant to be a comprehensive overview of all of it, and it’s meant to be understandable, and it’s meant to be utilized by both managers and employees.”

26:06 Discoveries Rogers made during the writing process.

26:50 [On staying humble] – “I found that I fall prey to a lot of the same things that executives fall prey to, which is, believing my own press, believing my ideas are the best, believing that only my opinions count. I’ve found that really listening to the people around me makes a big difference.”

27:00 Rogers discusses some of the milestones in her career, and the significant clients she’s worked with

28:42 The two primary factors of inefficiency, and the importance of time management.

30:12 Roger’s preferred tools for productivity during travel.

Expert Bio

Dorriah Rogers, Ph.D., began her career in the engineering and advanced technology industry in the late 1990s. She founded Paradyne Consulting Works in 2003, and brings almost 20 years of unique experience providing guidance to numerous Fortune 500 organizations throughout North America. She specializes in identifying and solving issues affecting efficiency, productivity, and profitability. Her client base includes Fortune 100 organizations, as well as the Department of Defense, U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. As CEO of Paradyne Consulting Works, she has led her team in the areas of productivity and process improvement, strategic business planning, operational streamlining, profitability, and organizational change management.

For more information, visit Dorriah Rogers’s company website.

Contact Info for Dorriah Rogers

Web address: http://www.paradyneconsulting.com/

Travels from: Thousand Oak, CA

Phone: 858-442-4295

Follow, connect, and learn from this guest’s social media channels:

LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube

Resources Mentioned by Dorriah Rogers on My Quest for the Best:

Joe Calloway

142: Focus on WOM – Featured Interview with Joe Calloway

Business Author, Consultant and Speaker

Joe Calloway, author of Magnetic, talks with Bill Ringle about being intentional about attracting new business and satisfying your existing customers.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The importance of committing to make every business experience to be a positive one for all involved
  • How to get more positive WOM (word of mouth)
  • The single most important strategic asset for many companies and how it relates to your relationship with your customers.
  • What he said to correct a misunderstanding, even when it came at significant out-of-pocket expense to replace 600 of the wrong title books sent to the meeting planner

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:03 Calloway recounts his childhood experience with entrepreneurship despite growing up in a small town with a father who was not, by any means, an entrepreneur.

1:53 “From an early age I was into selling stuff. I mowed a million yards, I raked a trillion yards. I think part of that came from my dad…if there was something special that I wanted, he would say ‘That’s great, how much money do you have saved up?’”

3:00 How Calloway transitioned from an interest in politics to a career in business.

3:49 [Recalling a stint in a real estate agency] – “The way I got paid was based on how much all the agents made, it was based on all the revenue generated in the firm, and that’s where I got big by the bug of ‘What can I come up with or what can I pass along in terms of ideas that will help other people be more successful?’ Because the more successful they were, it had an absolute direct impact on my own income.”

5:00 “I just am really good at paying attention. And that was my technique and my method, and I do it to this day, my job is to study the marketplace, and to look for individuals and organizations, businesses large and small, across the board, every kind of industry, and profession, and business you can imagine, and what I look for is quite simply this: who are the ones who are the market leaders who are successful and able to sustain that success?”

5:55 “What is it that top performers do that any of us could do if we just chose to?”

6:18 “It’s not easy to succeed in business, but it’s not a mystery. I don’t believe there are any secrets to success. I think the ideas that work are right out there in the open for all of us. So it’s a matter of getting intentional about using those ideas and doing the hard work necessary to execute on those ideas.”

7:58 Calloway describes why it’s important for people in this industry to stay relevant.

8:17 “I have to stay relevant, which means I’ve got to stay current on what is working in the marketplace.”

8:31 [On being hirable as a speaker] – “I work really hard at having a deep understanding of who is in my audience.”

9:04 The significance of tying what you’re speaking about to the audience you’re addressing, regardless of whether or not you’re an industry expert.

9:26 “You can have what you think is the greatest idea in the world, and be very passionate about it, but if other people don’t want it, if they don’t see the need for it, then you’ve got a hobby, you don’t have a business.”

11:00 Calloway asks the question: What’s the competitive advantage of being easy to do business with?

13:05 [On how to address people in an industry you’re not an expert in] – “What I can do is help make the link between ‘Here’s the principle, here’s the illustration of it, and here’s quite clearly what it has to do with you and your business.’”

14:20 “I perceive myself as being more of a facilitator than a speechmaker, because…I want to facilitate their thinking in a way that’s useful when they go back to work.”

14:50 [On what small businesses all say] – “How do I get customers, keep customers, and attract more customers?”

15:25 “It’s not what you say about yourself that matters one way or another, it’s what other people are saying about you, it’s what your customers are saying.”

16:08 [On using the internet and social media to you’re advantage] – “My biggest energy isn’t about what I post on social media, it’s about being intentional about creating a customer experience that is so compelling that my customers are saying things that drive new business to me.”

16:35 [On the worth of positive word of mouth] – “The biggest force in being magnetic is passed through word of mouth.”

17:25 The story of Western Water Works California and what they’ve done to become a market leader.

19:58 “The single greatest competitive advantage out there is satisfied customers.”

21:30 [On not apologizing to customers] “A lot of businesses [who] find themselves apologizing frequently to customers – well, hello, that’s a clue that you need to back up and solve whatever’s causing you to have to apologize.”

21:50 How a humble response to an honest mistake – but a big one since he sent 600 of the wrong title books sent to the meeting planner – kept chaos at bay and even made the situation better than expected.

23:14 “The point though is this, you don’t argue with a customer, you make it right, and you make it right so overwhelmingly that they say, ‘Ok, you just knocked my socks off. I’m going to talk about this.’

25:28 A nod to Warren Buffett and a discussion of the importance of using “no” to narrow your focus.

26:30 “Over the years, little by little, I’ve learned that it makes me a lot of money over the long haul to stick with what I do best and let other people do what they do best.”

27:45 How having a low tolerance level for jerks can be an effective filter in creating new business.

28:35 “I think it serves people really well to say ‘No’ more often, because it actually creates opportunity for the right things.”

29:20 Why you should say no to or walk away from those clients whose philosophy is in conflict with your philosophy.

31:15 [On saying no to clients who will be a drain on your energy] “Even though it’s money, it’s not good money.
32:35 The story of the Saint Paul Saints and how the owner’s dedication to hiring great people and getting out of their way makes the organization successful.

34:48 [The Saint Paul Saints method] – “If you hire the right people, you can totally turn them loose as long as they understand the direction that the business is going, you’ll be successful.

35:07 [The Saint Paul Saints method cont.] – “Fun is good.”

36:51 Pig-asso the baseball delivering pig.

37:10 “If people like doing business with you, that is a competitive advantage.”

37:55 How Old Dominion Trade Line simplifies their company language to encourage personal responsibility and ensure employees’ high performance.

40:00 [Paraphrasing Steve Jobs] – “If you can make things simple, you can move mountains.”

41:27 [On how expanding focus can lead to losing magnetic mojo] – “One trap that’s easy to fall into is to say ‘We could also do this, and we could also do that, and we can also this service, and we could also offer those products.’ Which might be the right thing to do, but we often stretch ourselves way beyond where we should be in terms of trying to do too many things.”

42:16 “For every ten ideas I have, for nine of them the market says ‘No, I don’t think so.’”

43:19 “You have to change to stay relevant. You have to improve, you have to innovate. But you’ve always got to create value in the eyes of the customers, otherwise it won’t work.”

43:45 [On reevaluating inventory] “We all need to periodically sit down with ourselves or with our teams and ask ‘Where are we spending way too much energy?”

46:02 Calloway’s daily rituals for productivity and success.

47:28 “You have to work at constantly being sure that you, and everyone else, are focused on what is most important.”

Expert Bio

Joe Calloway is a business author, consultant, and speaker who has served Coca-Cola, Verizon, and American Express among other well-known corporations. He also works with medical practices, law firms, and a range of professional services groups. Joe is the Executive in Residence at the Belmont University Center for Entrepreneurship.

Joe is the author of Be the Best at What Matters Most and five other business books that have been well-received by publications like The New York Times, Retailing Today, and Publisher’s Weekly.

His latest book is Magnetic: The Art of Attracting Business.

For more information, visit Joe’s website.

Contact Info for Joe Calloway

Web address: www.JoeCalloway.com

Travels from: Nashville, TN

Phone: (615) 429-7600

Contact:
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Resources Mentioned by Joe Calloway:

Julie Williamson

137: Purpose More, Transform Less – Featured Interview with Julie Williamson

Vice President of Strategy & Research for Karrikins Group

Julie Williamson talks with Bill Ringle about overcoming the obstacles to growth so you can create a company that matters to its employees, customers, and the larger community.
Key points that you’ll learn from this interview:
  • The connection between an unclear purpose and growth stagnation.
  • How when it comes to transformation, less is almost always better.
  • An example of a construction company transformation based on elevating its business relationships
  • A sure sign that technology is not being deployed effectively
  • A breakdown of how investing in customers, employees, and your community reflects both an abundance mentality and measurable ROI.

Expert Bio

Julie Williamson has worked with major corporations, helping them set and execute on strategy and transformation. She has also worked with smaller organizations (for-profit, non-profit, and government) to drive success as they seek to grow their revenue and their impact their communities.

Julie is an educator with experience at the undergraduate and graduate level, teaching organizational strategy, behavior, and change. Her students learn to connect theoretical concepts to real-world applications.

Her work with Peter Sheahan on the book MATTER: Create more value, move beyond the competition, and become the obvious choice highlights Julie’s commitment to shifting the focus of leaders to optimum levels.

For more information, visit Karrikin’s Group website.

Contact Info for Julie Williamson

Web address: http://www.karrikinsgroup.com

Travels from: Denver, CO

Contact:

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Resources Mentioned by Julie Williamson:

133: Make Learning Sweet – Featured Interview with Erika Andersen

Business Thinker, Speaker, and Author

Erika Andersen talks to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about leadership, strategic planning, and why it’s never ok to tell other people to do the things that you, yourself, are not doing.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • Why being a novice is so important for business leaders.
  • How executives have started to put resources behind developing their own leaders and managers to succeed at a higher level.
  • Why it’s important for learning to be sweet
  • What key inflection points made the biggest difference in growing Proteus in the last 10 years.
  • Six characteristics and skill sets of effective leaders.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:47 How Andersen’s work with Tim Galway in the 80s started her on her chosen career path.

2:10 “I really loved the whole focus on how organizations learn and don’t and how individuals learn and don’t.”

3:08 “I began Proteus in 1990 and it was really, from the beginning, the focus was helping our clients, both organizations and individuals clarify and work towards their hope for a future.”

4:35 [On her second book, Being Strategic] – “There really isn’t even a common definition about what it means to be strategic.”

4:50 [Definition of being strategic] – “Consistently making those core directional choices that will best move you towards your hope for a future. And that implies knowing what that hope for a future is.”

5:14 “If you don’t know where you’re trying to go, either individually or organizationally, and have some pretty clear stakes in the ground about what success will look like, and you don’t know where you’re starting from, you don’t have an accurate sense of your beginning point, then how can you make those core directional choices?”

6:13 “You need to know where you’re starting from, you need to know where you’re gonna get to, you need to be able to make those core statements of intention, which is what strategy is, and then consistency is filling them in with tactics.”

6:46 [Ideal Clients] – “Ideal clientness, in our mind, really has to do with openness. If someone is really open to new ways of operating, new ways of thinking about their situation, new skills, new techniques, new models…if someone is open, it makes it a 150M times easier to work with them.”

7:10 “Our ideal client is curious, honestly.”

8:07 “Even though our mission is very clear in helping people move toward their hope for a future, we have three practice areas where we work to do that.”

8:37 [On strengthening leaders] – “Even if you’re clear about your hope for a future, if you don’t have good, authentic leaders who can help you move in that direction, it’s probably not going to happen.”

9:10 What it means to have be at an inflection point.

10:04 “A lot of what I personally do is in that vision and strategy area.”

10:32 The story of how Andersen helped a media company be more mindful about their upcoming future.

12:09 “Quite often, in my experience, strategic planning is not satisfying. It is too abstract, too theoretical – people don’t often leave with a map, they leave with this huge binder that doesn’t really direct their actions.”

13:32 [On helping people open up to change] – “If it seems like there’s going to be a high degree of skepticism, we make sure to talk to people beforehand and explain the process to them, and, in some cases, show them.”

14:45 [On the benefits of making it fun] – “I’ve always felt as though when people feel powerful and engaged and ‘this is my thing,’ then they can learn. Learning doesn’t happen unless people feel like their having a good time.”

15:59 “The learning arises from inside the learner, and should be drawn out.”

17:06 “People are more interested in doing vision and strategy work than they were 3 or 4 years ago.”

17:27 “Senior executives are more cognizant of the fact that what helped them get through, and is still helping them get through, tough times is having great people who are really skilled, and smart, and productive, and committed to the enterprise.”

18:55 “My belief is that we are wired as human beings to look for certain characteristics in leaders.”

20:11 “I think whatever the circumstance, whatever the culture, people continue to look for these certain elements in people that they will allow to lead them.”

20:57 The six characteristics and skill sets of effective leaders.

23:07 [Definition of politics] – “The web and influence of power through which you need to navigate to reach your goals.”

23:24 [Politics in the workplace] – “To figure out in the organization who are your allies, who are your adversaries, and who are your fence sitters.”

25:05 The path that Proteus has taken to be successful and some important milestones along the way.

25:40 “It really shifts things when you have a book published. When it does well and it gets reviewed well and it gets published by a major publisher that really shifts the landscape and people really see you differently.”

26:50 [On tenability within Proteus] – “What an important thing it is for you to choose well and make certain that you’re well suited to your business partner.”

27:50 “We are really rigorous about practice what we preach.”

29:36 [The story of Mahatma Gandhi and the boy who ate too much sugar] – “It’s not ok to tell other people to do the things that you yourself are not doing.”

Expert Bio

Since 1980, Erika Andersen has developed a reputation for creating approaches to learning and business-building that are uniquely tailored to her clients’ challenges, goals, and culture. She and her colleagues at Proteus International, Inc. offer practical methods and skills for individuals, teams, and companies to clarify and then achieve their hoped-for-future.

Much of her recent work has focused on organizational visioning and strategy, executive coaching, and management and leadership development. In these capacities she has served as consultant and advisor to the CEOs and top executives of a number of corporations, including MTV Networks, Rockwell Automation, Turner Broadcasting, GE, TJX, NBC Universal, Union Square Hospitality Group, and Cablevision Corporation.

She has been invited to share her insights about managing people and creating successful businesses by speaking to corporations, non-profit groups and national associations. Her books and learning guides have been translated into several languages, and she has been quoted in a variety of national publications, including Glamour, Fortune, and The New York Times. She is the author of Growing Great Employees: Turning Ordinary People into Extraordinary Performers and Being Strategic: Plan for Success; Outthink Your Competitors; Stay Ahead of Change, as well as the author and host of Being Strategic with Erika Andersen on Public Television.

For more information, visit Erika’s website.

Contact Info for Erika Andersen

Business Phone: 212-830-9870

Web address: ErikaAndersen.com

Travels From: New York, NY

Follow Erika:

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Books by Erika Andersen

Steven-Snyder

132: What Does Success Teach Us? Nothing – Featured Interview with Steven Snyder

Founder of Snyder Leadership, Management Expert and Author

Management expert Steven Snyder talks to Bill Ringle about what leaders have in common, and why success is a bad teacher.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How consulting offers a post-graduate education in business.
  • Details about the what leaders find in common while advancing their business goals: change, tension points, and feeling off-balance at times.
  • The importance and value of embracing one’s own struggle story as a way to greater authenticity, clarity, and power.
  • When success can make a lousy teacher.
  • Different types of blind spots that leaders typically face.
  • How working to solve the wrong problem can be corrected.

Expert Bio

Steven Snyder is the founder and managing director of Snyder Leadership Group.

Snyder joined Microsoft in 1983, when the company was in its infancy. His work there, praised by Bill Gates, secured the relationship with IBM during a crucial stage in Microsoft’s growth and helped shape the history of the personal computer industry. Promoted as Microsoft’s first business unit general manager, Snyder led the company’s Development Tool business, where his team won PC Magazine’s Technical Excellence Award on three occasions.

In 1996, Snyder co-founded Net Perceptions, where he commercialized “collaborative filtering” – a technology that enables the real-time personalized recommendations that have become central to the online shopping experience. This groundbreaking work won Snyder the first-ever World Technology Award for Commerce in 1999 for “contributing to the advance of emerging technologies for the benefit of business and society.”

Snyder holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School, where he was a Baker Scholar, and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Minnesota.

Leadership and the Art of Struggle is his first book.

For more information, visit Steven’s website.

Contact Info for Steven Snyder

Web address: Snyderleadership.com

Travels From: Orono, MN

Contact:

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Books by Steven Snyder:

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Michael Stanier

122: Great Work vs. Good Work – Featured Interview with Michael Bungay Stanier

Author, Speaker, and Senior Partner of Box of Crayons

Michael Bungay Stanier talks with Bill Ringle about practical ways to do more great work instead of only good work.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The importance of structuring training that includes objectives for employee self-sufficiency
  • Understand what it means to great work vs. good work
  • Criteria for asking great questions
  • What effective coaching most resembles
  • How to overcome “hacking your own productivity systems”
  • When it makes sense NOT to coach as a manager

Expert Bio

Michael Bungay Stanier is the Senior Partner of Box of Crayons, a company that helps organizations do less Good Work and more Great Work. On the way to founding Box of Crayons ten years ago, Michael lived in Australia, England, the US and now Canada. As an innovation expert he helped invent new products and services, and as a change management consultant he supported companies as they evolved.

He’s written a number of books, the best known of which are Do More Great Work and the philanthropic project End Malaria; created a series of short internet videos, such as The Eight Irresistible Principles of Fun; and designed a wide range of training programs that are being used around the world.

He was the first Canadian Coach of the Year and a Rhodes Scholar. An internationally acclaimed professional keynote speaker, Michael is a popular speaker at business and coaching conferences around the world, including International Coaching Federation conferences, the OD Network, the International Association of Facilitators, CSTD and SHRM. He’s also Thinker in Residence at Knowledge Blocks, a resource for readers of business books. He’s been the Creativity Coach for David Allen’s Getting Things Done online community.

For more information, visit Michael’s website.

Contact Info for Michael Bungay Stanier

Business Phone: 416-532-1322

Web address: BoxofCrayons.biz

Travels From: Toronto, Canada

Follow Michael:

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Books by Michael Bungay Stanier

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Russell Bishop

121: Clear Your Focus – Featured Interview with Russell Bishop

Bestselling Author and Managing Partner of Bishop & Bishop

Bestselling Author Russell Bishop talks to Bill Ringle about how selective focus allows you to stay on track and be productive.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • What it means to have a solo focus rather than an organizational focus
  • Why strategy and objectives DON’T matter
  • A perspective on complaining that can transform the conversation into one of contribution
  • How good questions provoke clear thinking
  • Two simple questions to ask yourself to stay on track and productive

Russell Bishop talks with Bill Ringle about alignment and empowerment within organizations as key growth drivers.

Expert Bio

Russell Bishop is Managing Partner for Bishop & Bishop, a boutique consulting and coaching company. His seminars, coaching, and consulting expertise offer individuals and organizations a new approach to integrating personal and spiritual values into their personal and professional lives. As an internationally regarded speaker, educator, and consultant, his corporate clients include Fortune 500 executives in aerospace, healthcare, pharmaceutical and biotechnology, information technology, telecommunications and oil and gas.

Having started five different organizations in his career, Russell is well versed in the growth and expansion challenges faced by founding entrepreneurs and CEO’s. Executives and senior teams frequently engage his services on issues of leadership, growth and work-life balance. In 1978, he created Insight Seminars, one of the largest and most successful personal transformation programs in the world, with well over one million graduates in 34 countries.

In addition to his bestselling book, Workarounds That Work: How to Overcome Anything That Stands in Your Way at Work, he is the author of hundreds of articles on the power of choice and awareness and a frequent contributor to the Huffington Post. He has also lectured on productivity for the executive MBA programs at UCLA, University of Texas and Washington University in St. Louis.

For more information, visit Russell’s website.

Contact Info for Russell Bishop

Web address: RussellBishop.com

Travels From: Los Angeles, CA

Follow Russell:

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mike figliuolo2

120: How Good Managers Become Great Leaders – Featured Interview with Mike Figliuolo

Managing Director of thoughtLEADERS, LLC

In this interview, Mike Figliuolo discusses the components help good managers become great leaders, and why the focus of leaders should always be on the people they’re leading. 

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The distinction between managing and leading, advocated by Admiral Grace Mary Hopper
  • Stages to building a profitable, scalable training company
  • What leaders did to deepen trust and improve communications at a Fortune 100 company
  • Why boundaries are so elusive for leaders and how to make them work better
  • The mindset needed to grow your company in a short period of time

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:12 How Figliuolo’s experiences at WestPoint launched him into a career in leadership.

2:52 “I think the biggest realization in terms of people leadership is getting to know people as individuals and treating them that way.”

3:23 “To lead [people] effectively you couldn’t treat them like a cog in the machine, you needed to understand who they were, what motivated them, who inspired them in order to get the best out of them.”

4:47 “I say to them, ‘Tell me what you’re spending your time on,’ and invariably a lot of that time is spent in meetings, on email, on powerpoint, or in excel. The question I then ask is, ‘Help me understand how replying to e-mails and clearing out your inbox is more important and more impactful than sitting down with a member of your team for ten minutes or fifteen minutes trying to figure out what they’re working on or what they care about.”

5:50 [On the biggest myths in leadership] – “We confuse management and leadership.”

6:22 [Paraphrasing Admiral Grace Mary Hopper] – “You manage things and you lead people.”

7:07 “If you didn’t understand your people and you burn them out in the process and your people felt like you didn’t care about them as you got all these things done and managed well, I would think that you’re not really a good leader, you’re a poor one.”

7:24 “The best leaders I know are the ones who do both. To be a great leader you also have to be a really good manager.”

8:08 The importance of giving people room to make mistakes, and also to stand up for them.

9:20 [On Figliuolo’s Ideal Client] – “Most of our clients tend to be large corporations, Fortune 1000’s types of organizations, because we spend a lot of time with their executives as well as their learning development professionals.”

10:06 [On problem-solving communication issues] – “We tend to go in and teach people a method for being clearer, being more succinct, and being more impactful.”

11:00 [On decision-making issues] – “We all see the analysis paralysis which can grip an organization, and we help them understand how they can make decisions more quickly, how can they reduce the risk in the decisions they’re making, and how can they break that gridlock.”

11:45 “The reason I built the course was: I was seeing a lot of folks who were spending more time managing than they were leading, and I was seeing some confusion around that. I was seeing folks miss major aspects of leadership, which were causing major problems.”

12:55 What leaders did to deepen trust and improve communications at a Fortune 100 company.

13:05 “When people really understood a lot better what drove the other members of the team, you could see the connections happening in the classroom.”

14:30 [On leadership skills] – “One thing that I see as a need is being able to let go and give people space.”

15:17 “As companies grow, we might outgrow our leaders. And the very mature organizations I’ve seen and the successful ones I’ve seen have a recognition of: we need that next level of talent and how do we get there?”

16:05 “I think the role of that senior executive is really setting that direction first and foremost, because the pressing needs of the daily operations tend to pull us down and we focus on the minutiae in front of us.”

16:55 “You have plenty of people on your team who can solve those day to operational issues, but you have very few people on your team who are doing that longer range look at where you’re taking the organization.”

17:36 “One of the reasons we don’t have balance in our work or in our lives is that we don’t set those boundaries, we don’t think about them. Or even if we do think about them we don’t always articulate them to the people around us and share what those boundaries are.”

20:09 [On the Leadership Maxim] – “It’s that individuals responsibility to spend that time reflecting and being introspective on what is important.”

20:55 Why it’s important for employees to talk to leaders to ascertain how to be better aligned with the company’s goals, and why leaders should create space for these conversations to happen.

21:45 “If you don’t know what motivates and inspires your people, it’s really hard to motivate and inspire them.”

22:39 “Once you understand what that person wants, you’re better able to get that higher performance out of them, because you have an understanding of what’s important to them.”

23:08 [Challenges of owning your own company] – “You are fully responsible for the success or failure of your organization as an entrepreneur. I like to say, ‘If I don’t sell, I don’t eat.’”

23:50 [On benefits of owning your own company] – “When your organization is extremely successful, you know it’s because of all of your hard work, and there’s a direct correlation between the input and the output of the organization.”

24:31 [On letting go] – “If I send one of these senior people out, I need to be comfortable that they’re going to conduct the training in a manner that’s most effective for them.”

26:15 Figliuolo’s path from part time consultant to full time entrepreneur.

28:09 How Figliuolo is inspired by his clients.

29:02 “We get to ask ourselves, ‘Is what we’re building and delivering meeting the needs, meeting the latest challenges of our clients?’”

30:23 “We’re always trying to make that what we’re delivering is going to help the organization at a broader level.”

31:00 What Figliuolo looks at to gauge progress in his organization.

Expert Bio

Mike Figliuolo is the Managing Director of thoughtLEADERS, LLC, which he founded because he believes practitioners make the best instructors and because he has a passion for people development and organizational improvement. Mike’s book, One Piece of Paper: The Simple Approach to Powerful, Personal Leadership, is designed to help leaders define who they are and what their personal leadership philosophy is.

Before founding thoughtLEADERS, Mike was a United States Army Officer, a management consultant at McKinsey and Company, Group Manager at Capital One Financial, and Vice President of Strategic Planning at The Scotts Miracle-Gro Company. He was named the Columbus, Ohio Small Business Leader of the Year for 2010 by the Columbus Chamber of Commerce and Business First.

For more information, visit Mike’s website.

 

Contact Info for Mike Figliuolo

Business Phone: 804-241-9757

Web address: ThoughtLeadersLLC.com

Travels From: Columbus, OH

Follow Mike:
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Books by Mike Figliuolo

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Doug Conant2

116: Turning the Coin Over – Featured Interview with Doug Conant

CEO of ConantLeadership and former CEO of Campbell Soup Co.

Former CEO of Campbell Soup Co. Doug Conant talks to Bill Ringle about personal leadership and taking charge of the things you can actually control.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How getting fired can lead to new and better opportunities
  • What it means to “turn the coin over” when presented with a problem
  • The two top qualities of mind that set exceptional leaders apart from well-intentioned leaders
  • How you can use the criteria to win in the marketplace in your own business
  • What resulted from combining the social agenda with the value agenda at Cambell’s Soup for employees and other stakeholders

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:12 Where Conant started his career, moving from Kellogg in Chicago to General Mills in Minnesota.

2:05 [On how to get things done] – “I learned very early on that most of the people I worked with had full lives. If they were going to be helpful to me, I generally needed to be helpful to them.”

2:53 How getting fired from General Mills played a pivotal role in Conant’s career, and how meeting executive outplacement counselor Neil McKenna helped get Conant made the difference in getting him back on his feet.

4:45 “It reaffirmed for me the importance of just trying to be helpful, to be helpful in a thoughtful caring way, with intentionality to move the enterprise forward.”

5:27 [Lessons learned: The Importance of Empathy] – “My first thought was one of betrayal and devastation, I had given everything to this company for nine years, and I felt it was incredibly insensitive the way it was handled. And that was a good thing too because I’ve had to make tough calls too, but I’ve made them in a caring way.”

6:45 Turning the coin over after devastating news.

8:09 [Paraphrasing Louis L’Amour on Perseverance] –  “He never knew when he was licked, so he never was.”

9:37 “Great things are having powerful incremental impacts in the moment with people.”

10:21 “Life is just a sequence of interactions. And if I’m really alert and thinking abundantly I find that I can be helpful in those small interactions, and cumulatively over time, I develop enormous credibility, which Stephen Covey might call a very positive emotional bank account with people. And as we build the emotional bank account up, it’s amazing what we find we are able to do collectively and individually.”

11:01 “It’s about making it personal. People are either at work or thinking about work, more than anything else they do, including spending time with their families. I think we sort of have to honor that as sacred ground, their work, and I think we have to take it personally.”

11:19 “I have found that if I make it personal and it I lean into creating a personally fulfilling work experience for people, they lean into the agenda of the company in a more personal and committed way.”

11:41 “Make it personal, be alert to the moment – be helpful in the moment, are two of the foundational ideas that I have…The third one would be that leadership, ultimately, it starts with personal leadership and getting comfortable with the things you can control.”

12:20 “If you really want to be good at leadership, my observation is that you have to treat it as a mastery model. You have to apprentice at it, you have to work at it, you have study it, you have to be thoughtful about it, you have to think through your philosophy of how you want to walk in the world and how you want to lead.”

13:06 “I take issue, for the most part, with this concept of born leaders. Some leaders have a capacity to lead at a certain level that may be above average, but to be great I guarantee you they all work at at.”

13:17 Jack Welch’s leadership work ethic.

14:14 Some of the problems Campbell’s faced internally and externally before Conant took leadership in the company.

16:33 “We were overpraising and under delivering and making bad decisions to patch up the performance.”

18:29 Conant lists the four criteria you need to win in the marketplace.

21:01 [On challenges in taking over leadership at Campbell’s] – “It literally took a few years to get the kind of traction we needed and get the company on solid footing.”

23:04 “I was going to bed thinking about all of the things we needed to do 365 days a year for the first three years.”

23:45 “Employees are not mind readers. You need to tell them what’s expected and how to expected to deliver that performance.”

24:25 “The more clear we could be, the more accessible the whole came to every employee.”

24:34 How Conant used the “Balanced Scorecard” create clarity and direction for employees.

25:50 “The single most important thing in any of these organizations is employee engagement.”

26:32 “I have found over time that if I just focus on the people, the people take care of the business. But if you have to put one over the other, you put the people first.”

27:02 The Campbell Success Model – metrics for management.

29:14 The Boston College reputation institute.

30:17 [Campbell’s success model] – “Winning in the workplace, winning in the marketplace, winning in the community, and winning with integrity.”

30:59 “It helps to have metrics, it helps to create focus for the organization that says, at a high level, this is what we stand for as a company.”

32:04 “The more engaged people can become in the work of the enterprise, the better you’ll do.”

32:15 Four things which drive employee engagement.

33:15 “Driving an aggressive social agenda, while we were driving an aggressive economic value creation agenda was very synergistic. Because we were saying, ‘Here’s how you can leave a legacy of contribution through your work that transcends your ordinary work experience while you’re making a living, while you’re feeling valued, and while you’re learning.”

33:44 “The more we leaned into building a better world, the more engaged our employees got, and the better we performed in the marketplace.”

35:14 “I think the challenge in the next decade is going to be for corporations to build this intuitively obvious practice more into the fabric of how they run their companies.”

36:01 Examples of companies building a better world by building better companies.

37:11 “All organizations aspire to be relevant in the world, to certainly create economic value, but they also are committed to enduring success. All leaders want to be associated with enduring success. And they see the value in being good citizens.”

38:12 “It’s important that once you declare yourself, you deliver on it.”

39:24 What Conant reads for inspiration.

Expert Bio

Doug Conant is the founder and CEO of ConantLeadership, which is dedicated to helping improve the quality of leadership in the 21st century. He is passionate about employee engagement and firmly believes in the importance of coming up with your own leadership model.

Doug was appointed President and CEO of Campbell Soup Company in 2001. Under his leadership, Campbell reversed a precipitous decline in market value and employee engagement; the company has won many recognitions since, including the prestigious 2010 Catalyst Award. When Doug retired in 2011, he received the American Society of Training and Development (ASTD) 2011 Champion of Workplace Learning and Performance Award.

Doug joined Campbell with 25 years of experience from three of the world’s leading food companies: General Mills, Kraft and Nabisco. He began his career in 1976 in marketing at General Mills. After 10 years, he moved to Kraft where he held top management positions in marketing and strategy. Immediately prior to coming to Campbell, he was President of the $3.5 billion Nabisco Foods Company where he led his team to improved marketplace performance and five consecutive years of double-digit earnings growth.

During his tenure at Campbell, Doug established the Campbell CEO Institute to train the company’s future leaders and ensure that the company’s highest-potential employees were well-equipped to handle the challenges and surprises that inevitably create a leader’s impact and legacy.

He is now a sought-after speaker on leading with integrity and other business topics, and is the co-author of the New York Times bestselling book TouchPoints: Creating Powerful Leadership Connections in the Smallest of Moments.

For more information, visit Doug’s website.

 

Contact Info for Doug Conant

Web address: ConantLeadership.com

Travels From: Philadelphia, PA

Follow Doug: Twitter

Books by Doug Conant

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mette norgaard

115: Share Your Code to Become a Better Leader – Featured Interview with Mette Norgaard

Strategic Leadership and Learning Expert and Author

Mette Norgaard talks to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about how you communicate with your team will make or break you as a leader.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • What leaders who care about the human side of business can be observed doing regularly
  • How the Finnish Broadcasting situation was turned around one lunch conversation at a time
  • What distinguishes a conversation from a Touchpoint opportunity
  • Why sharing your “code” with your team can make you a better leader
  • How to combine your words and energy in an interaction to produce extraordinary impact
  • What you can do to sidestep the myth of “no time to slow down”

Expert Bio

Mette Norgaard, Ph. D., MBA, is an expert on strategic leadership and learning. She works with executives to design and deliver learning solutions that advance the company’s strategy. She has also designed and participated in executive dialogues and workshops with thought leaders such as Stephen Covey, Jim Collins, John Katzenbach, Rob Goffee, Margaret Wheatley, and Ram Charan.

Over the years, Mette has taught thousands of leaders from a wide range of organizations, including Procter & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, GE Capital, Estée Lauder, the US Armed Forces, and Harley-Davidson. In addition, she has worked closely with the executive teams at companies like Metro International, Pandora Jewelry, and Finnish Broadcasting. Finally, she has been a long-term partner on the development of high-potential leaders at companies like Campbell and Microsoft.

Her latest book, co-authored with Doug Conant, CEO of Campbell, is TouchPoints: Creating Powerful Leadership Connections in the Smallest of Moments. She is also the author of the international bestseller The Ugly Duckling Goes to Work: Wisdom for the Workplace from the Classic Tales of Hans Christian Andersen, which has been published in many languages, including Spanish, Portuguese, Japanese, and Chinese.

Prior to starting her own practice, Mette worked with FranklinCovey Co for ten years. She was the director of Principle-Centered Leadership Week, an executive retreat at Sundance, UT. In addition, she was part of a small team of consultants who led large-scale change processes for Fortune 500 firms and the US Government. Before joining FranklinCovey Co, Mette served as a leader in both healthcare and manufacturing, and she knows first-hand the incessant pressures to do more with less and do it faster.

For more information, visit Mette’s website.

Contact Info for Mette Norgaard

Web address: MetteNorgaard.com

Travels From: New York, NY

Follow Mette:

 Twitter LinkedIn

Books by Mette Norgaard

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paul heagan

106: The Leaders Climb – Interview with Paul Heagen

President and Founder of Defining Moments Consulting

Cincinatti, OH

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How an early start in news radio led to a career in executive coaching
  • What to do when you find yourself going too fast and fighting too many decisions
  • The similarities of a movie script to a life script
  • How having a professional code of behavior makes it easy to be consistent and credible
  • How publishing a book creates a public standard and personal challenge for congruence

Expert Bio

Paul Heagen, President and Founder of Defining Moments Consulting, is an executive coach who guides executives through crucial events and phases of their business and personal lives. His belief that reputations, purpose, and even destiny are shaped by how leaders capitalize on such “defining moments” has distinguished his work for more than 30 years, with clients ranging from Disney to Cisco to Fidelity Investments.

He has been an instructor with the Cincinnati-based Goering Institute and is a high-ranked presenter at conferences and workshops on topics ranging from personal branding and the role of storytelling in propelling business growth. He is also the co-author of The Leader’s Climb: A Business Tale of Rising to the New Leadership Challenge and the author of Real Owls Don’t Bark: Commonsense Lessons of Ordinary Life.

For more information, visit Paul’s website.

Contact Info for Paul Heagan

Business Phone: 513-260-8330 

Web address: DefiningMoments.me

Travels From: Cincinatti, NY

Follow Paul: Twitter

Books by Paul Heagan

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kevin cashman

104: Leadership from the Inside Out – Interview with Kevin Cashman

Bestselling Author, Global CEO Coach, and Senior Partner at Korn/Ferry

Minneapolis, MN

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The value of both outer tools (strategy, communications, team building, finance,…) and inner tools (self-awareness of values, character, talents, vision,…) for great leaders
  • What it takes to transform the volatility, unpredictability, complex, and ambiguous elements to those of vision, understanding, clarity, and agility
  • How it took 9 years of research and 1 year of writing to create The Pause Principle book
  • What steps Kevin took to add a “pause environment” in his home

Expert Bio

Over the past 30 years, Kevin Cashman has been involved in coaching and developing thousands of senior executives and senior teams in more than 60 countries. He is recognized as a pioneer in leadership development and executive coaching, focusing on optimizing executive, team, and organizational performance. He was recently named one of the top ten thought leaders by Leadership Excellencemagazine.

Kevin joined Korn/Ferry Leadership and Talent Consulting in 2006 via its acquisition of LeaderSource, a firm he founded and that was ranked as one of the top three in leadership development globally. Kevin is also the founder of the Executive to Leader Institute®, an interdisciplinary approach to leadership development and executive coaching, and Chief Executive Institute®, a comprehensive, integrated, globally delivered leadership development and coaching program for CEOs and CEO successors.

A frequent keynote speaker at conferences and corporate events, Kevin is a senior fellow of the Caux Roundtable, a global consortium of CEOs dedicated to enhancing principle-based leadership internationally. He is also a board member for the Center for Ethical Business Cultures fostering ethical leadership in corporations.

Kevin is the author of five books on leadership and career development, including The Pause Principle and Awakening the Leader Within. His breakout bestseller, Leadership from the Inside Out, was named the #1 bestselling business book of 2000 and one of the top twenty bestselling business books of the decade by 800-CEO-READ. He has written numerous articles and papers on leadership and career management, and has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Chief Executive, Human Resource Executive, Fast Company, Strategy & Leadership, Oprah, CNN, National Public Radio, and other national media. Kevin was formerly the host of CareerTalk.

For more information, visit Kevin’s website.

Contact Info for Kevin Cashman

Business Phone: 612-746-5166 

Web address: LeadershipFromTheInsideOut.com

Travels From: Minneapolis, MN

Follow Kevin: Twitter

Books by Kevin Cashman

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peter bregman

103: 18 Minutes – Interview with Peter Bregman

Award-winning Author and CEO of Bregman Partners, Inc.

New York, NY

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The right environment to train business leaders who must have dangerous conversations
  • What makes the “You can have it all” myth so important to burst
  • How to use 5 boxes on your daily planner to accomplish the most important objectives each year

Expert Bio

Peter Bregman is the CEO of Bregman Partners, Inc., a global management consulting firm that advises CEOs and their leadership teams. He speaks, writes, and consults about how to lead and how to live.

He is the author, most recently, of 18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, and Get the Right Things Done, which was the winner of the Gold Medal from the Axiom Business Book awards, named the best business book of the year on NPR, and selected by Publisher’s Weekly and the New York Post as a top 10 business book of the year. He is also the author of Point B: A Short Guide to Leading a Big Change and co-author of five other books. Featured on PBS, ABC and CNN, Peter is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Forbes, National Public Radio (NPR), Psychology Today, and CNN, as well as a weekly commentator on Fox Business News.

Peter began his career teaching leadership on wilderness and mountaineering expeditions and then moved into the consulting field with the Hay Group and Accenture, before starting Bregman Partners in 1998. Peter has advised CEO and senior leaders in many of the world’s premier organizations, including Allianz, American Express, Brunswick Group, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Deutsche Bank, JPMorgan Chase, FEI, GE Capital, Merck, Clear Channel, Nike, UNICEF, and many others.

Peter bases his work on the notion that an organization, at its core, is a platform for talent. By unleashing that talent, focusing it on business results, and aligning it with a compelling vision, both the individual and the organization thrive. Since 1989, Peter has trained and coached all levels of management and individuals to recognize their leadership, exhibit leadership behaviors, model and stimulate change, and foster their own development and growth as well as that of their teams and colleagues.

For more information, visit Peter’s website.

Contact Info for Peter Bregman

Web address: PeterBregman.com

Travels From: New York, NY

Follow Peter: Twitter

Books by Peter Bregman

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rodger dean duncan

101: Change Friendly Leadership – Interview with Rodger Dean Duncan

Founder and CEO of Duncan Worldwide

Kansas City, MO

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • What newscaster Jim Lehrer taught Rodger about good interviewing
  • Why it is important to set up and maintain an environment to challenge the status quo
  • How an losing agra business turned itself around in 12 months and yielded a $252 million profit
  • Points of effective communication with a change initiative
  • The importance of being wiling to be influenced

Expert Bio

After an early career as an award-winning journalist and university professor, Dr. Rodger Dean Duncan founded Duncan Worldwide in 1972 to serve the needs of organizations seeking to boost performance. His client roster ranges from American Airlines, IBM, Consolidated Edison, and Sprint, to Black & Veatch Engineering, eBay, Federal Reserve Bank, and presidential cabinet officers in two White House administrations.

A highly-sought-after speaker, trainer, and executive coach, Rodger is widely known for his expertise in the strategic management of change – for individuals as well as for organizations. He has been the keynote speaker at many industry conferences and workshops related to human performance and organizational effectiveness. In addition to his consulting practice, Rodger headed worldwide communication for Campbell Soup Company and was vice president of a global energy company.

Rodger is the author of Change-friendly Leadership: How to Transform Good Intentions into Great Performance. The Duncan Report, his Internet column on leadership and organizational effectiveness, now reaches opt-in business subscribers in over 130 countries.

For more information, visit Rodger’s website.

Contact Info for Dr. Rodger Dean Duncan

Business Phone: 816-415-1605 

Web address: DoctorDuncan.com

Travels From: Kansas City, MO

Follow Rodger: Twitter

Books by Dr. Rodger Dean Duncan

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nick sarillo

100: A Slice of the Pie – Featured Interview with Nick Sarillo

Author, Speaker, and CEO of Nick’s Pizza & Pub

Chicago, IL

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • The most important aspect of a business is not it’s product or people or process, but another “p” word
  • The importance of making your company values current and present to each employee so that employees can use values in day-to-day decision making
  • The case of the burned bottom pizza, and the broader lessons any business owner can draw from it
  • Why you need to oversee multiple health dimensions of a business for all stakeholders
  • What exceptional factors drives higher profits and lower turnover in a traditionally slim margin and low commitment business that you can model in your business

Expert Bio

Nick Sarillo is the founder and CEO of Nick’s Pizza & Pub, the sixth busiest independent pizza company in per-store sales in the United States. Founded with the purpose of providing the community with an unforgettable place where families could relax and have fun, Nick’s Pizza & Pub has margins nearly twice that of the average pizza restaurant and boasts an 80 percent employee retention rate in an industry in which the average annual turnover is over 150 percent.

A regular speaker at entrepreneurship and HR conferences, Sarillo credits his company’s success to his purpose-driven culture. Nick is also the author of A Slice of the Pie: How to Build a Big Little Business, which offers small business owners a handbook for creating a culture that will support a business through good times and bad – even in an industry where turnover is high, expectations are low, and a college degree is not required.

For more information, visit Nick’s website.

Contact Info for Nick Sarillo

Web address: NickSarillo.com

Travels From: Chicago, IL

Follow Nick:
Twitter LinkedIn Facebook

Books by Nick Sarillo

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matthew may

82: The Simple Elegance of Shibumi: Featured Interview with Matthew May

Founder, Shibumi Creative Works; Innovation Consultant; Speaker; Bestselling Author

Matthew May talks to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about creative marketing and the importance of embracing Shibumi in your business.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How Matt’s career took off with the publication of his book.
  • How the refinement of a loom design factors into Toyota’s heritage and culture.
  • What shibumi means for business leaders.
  • How to combat crippling complexity in organizations.

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:12 How Matthew got started in his career as a speaker, author, and coach.

1:27 May tells about how a three day coaching gig with Toyota turned into an 8 year stint, and launched his coaching career and to the publication his first book, The Elegant Solution: Toyota’s Formula for Mastering Innovation

3:18 “My entire world was sort of trying to help [Toyota] create and launch Toyota University, and I found myself up against a brick wall there halfway through my time.”

3:52 [On the story of Sakichi Toyoda] – “He spent the entirety of his adult career developing not an automobile, but an automatic loom for spinning and weaving. His entire quest was to have a loom that would stop working whenever a single thread broke.”

4:57 “It’s not about doing, it’s about stop doing.”

5:28 [On Shibumi] – “It’s this sort of effortless elegance, this elegant simplicity,– the ability to achieve the maximum effect with the minimum means.”

6:08 “As I look around me I see a crippling complexity, excessive waste, whether it’s in a product or whether it’s in government, whether it’s in policy, no matter what it is, there just seems to be too much of everything.”

6:39 “I approach companies and teams about finding elegant solutions, generally by looking at a problem and looking at it from a consumer’s point of view or a user’s point of view.”

8:05 “About 10 years ago Toyota failed miserably trying to market the Toyota brand to new millennials…it was a car that Mom and Dad drove.”

8:38 “They realized they needed a new product, a new brand to appeal to this upcoming generation…but they quickly learned that they didn’t understand that generation.”

9:29 How Toyota’s “field agents” were able to infiltrate the younger customer base and create the XB, a customizable model that couldn’t stay in dealer lots.

10:11 “The kids picked it up, spent another 15 grand outfitting it…It was nothing about the car, it was everything to do with what you could do to the car.”

12:05 [On training salespeople on selling this new kind of car] – “There was a number of dimensions that came to light in terms of how to talk to this new population. Gen Y’ers, new Millennials do not like advertising.”

14:45 “We are not used to doing what designers do, which is to get out of our cubicles and offices and walk a mile in the shoes of our customer.”

15:53 “I think a lot of times organizations aren’t exactly sure how to pull creativity and innovation from their employee base.”

16:22 Why suggestion boxes are really complaint boxes.

17:02 “People don’t want to change unless it’s their idea.”

17:20 “When the direction of flow of information and attention is reversed, where someone is coming to you saying ‘I don’t know how to do this. I want to change certain things, how do I do it?”

18:12 How change begins with a pocket of interest.

18:26 [On creating a space for shared ownership] – “It’s a pull, rather than a push. I think when you’re trying to push something through an organization…even though they might not say it, if it’s your idea, then it will always be your idea. The trick is to A) find folks who are interested in the first place or B) if they’re not, and a higher level executive is telling a middle level manager that they need to do this, the trick is to make it their idea.”

20:47 Where May gets his regular inspiration for writing his columns, and how he is able to curate those ideas for a broader audience.

22:30 [On the significance of curation] – “In the name of excess, we’re overwhelmed by knowledge. One way that I can add value to the world and this business conversation is to help others in a radar screen or filter kind of fashion, looking for things.”

23:58 “The new exciting world of social media is allowing people to go beyond the good old job description and be able to add insight and value in new and exciting ways.”

25:11 “People are starting to work more like artists and scientists did and do. They’re trying to focus on a question that’s important to them in the confines of their work, use the resource constraints that are being imposed on them, because we all are facing them right now, and use them as a creative challenge.”

26:20 “I think people are more resourceful, more ingenious, and ready to ply their ingenuity.”

Expert Bio

Matthew E. May is an internationally recognized author, speaker and coach on creativity, innovation and design strategy. In 2011, he launched Shibumi Creative Works, an innovation consultancy dedicated to improving human creative capital in business, work and life.

A popular speaker and confidential adviser, Matt lectures each year to corporations, governments, and universities around the world, as well as facilitates creative teams and coaches senior leaders in companies of all sizes. He spent nearly a decade as a close adviser to Toyota and is a master kaizen coach. His articles have appeared in national publications such as USAToday, Design Mind, and MIT/Sloan Management Review. He has been featured and quoted in The Wall Street Journal, the New Yorker , and on National Public Radio.

Matt is the author of three bestselling, award-winning books: The Shibumi Strategy: A Powerful Way to Create Meaningful Change; In Pursuit of Elegance: Why the Best Ideas Have Something Missing, named to the BusinessWeek 2009 Best Business Books list in the Design/Innovation category; and The Elegant Solution: Toyota’s Formula for Mastering Innovation, which won the Shingo Research Prize for Excellence and was selected as one of 800CEORead’s “Best Business Books of 2006.”

For more information, visit Matt’s website.

Contact Info for Matthew E. May

Business Phone: 805-230-2908

Web address: MatthewEMay.com

Travels From: Los Angeles, CA

Follow Matthew: Twitter

Books by Matthew E. May

Resources Mentioned 

Seth Godin

Chris Brogan

Guy Kawasaki

Dan Pink

Bill Taylor

Helen Walters

Richard Florida – the Rise of the Creative Class

scott klososky

76: The Shifting Marketplace – Featured Interview with Scott Klososky

Author, Social Technology Expert, and Founder of Alkami Technology

Scott Koslosky talks to Bill Ringle on My Quest for the Best about changing marketplace technology and how to know when you’re ready to expand your business.

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How a dyslexic boss showed how to find a willing market and build a business from the ground up
  • What it took to sell to larger companies as a startup
  • Mistakes made and lessons learned from overly ambitious business expansion
  • What CEOs need to know now about leadership skills in the age of digital marketing and social media

Interview Insights

Click to Read the Show Notes

1:05 Scott discusses how he got his start in business with a start-up that he joined at 18.

2:13 Scott describes how he worked his way up this company straight out of high school, then began his own business.

6:19 “The first things I learned right off the bat were how much accountability there was when you’re the one who now owns [the company]. There’s no one really that’s going to come to your rescue. You have to make all the decisions.”

7:08 It took four months to get his company to stability.

8:04 Scott realized he was no longer in “start-up mode” when his company picked up big orders from large companies, as well as when they opened new stores.

9:03 However, he does admit that his naivety caused his company to grow too fast, and later had to file for bankruptcy.

9:54 Scott talks about the problems faced by young entrepreneurs.

11:50 “You have to be good at looking forward into the future.”

13:15 Scott always recommends that a company gets a two-year lead on the competition with how they use technology.

13:41 There are two areas to think about when trying to grow one’s technology use in the business: back of house and digital marketing.

18:12 Scott wrote his book “The Velocity Manifesto” because he was working with so many leaders who didn’t understand the difference that technology makes in the marketplace, and they needed to cultivate new skills regarding technology strategies.

23:01 Every company should be able to access all customer information in one platform.

23:30 Digital marketing engines are also a necessary technology to keep up with their competitors.

24:35 Some indicators of sustainability that Scott always looks out for in his company are profitability and profit growth, as well as how well the company is helping clients succeed.

29:00 The customization of how people market to specific businesses and demographics will continue to change.

30:43 Every day, Scott digests as much information as he can so that he can be more valuable in the marketplace and a more effective leader.

32:06 “The marketplace is changing, and technology is driving that change.”

Expert Bio

Scott Klososky, a former CEO of three successful startup companies, currently serves as founder and Chairman of the Board of Alkami Technology, which focuses on providing online account management solutions to the financial services industry. Scott also works with senior executives in organizations ranging from Fortune 500 corporations to universities and nonprofits, including Cisco, Ebay, Volvo, and the American Payroll Association. He helps his clients integrate social technologies into their strategic direction as well as improve their utilization of technology as a tool.

Scott is the author of three books: The Velocity Manifesto: Harnessing Technology, Vision and Culture to Future Proof Your Organization, Enterprise Social Technologies: Helping Organizations Harness the Power of Social Media, Social Networking, Social Relevancy, and Managing with Social Technology, a McGraw Hill Brief Case Series Book that is targeted specifically at giving managers a roadmap for implementing and using social tools in order to improve productivity and results.

For more information, visit Scott’s website.

Contact Info for Scott Klososky

Business Phone: 405-359-3910

Web address: http://www.fpov.com/scott-speaks/

Travels From: Detroit, MI

Follow Scott:

Twitter

Books by Scott Klososky

sally helgesen

70: The Female Vision – Interview with Sally Helgesen

Sally Helgesen, Internationally Acclaimed Speaker, Leadership Consultant, and Bestselling Author

 

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How senior leaders are looking to use women’s leadership more strategically.
  • How technology allows customers and prospective employees to evaluate the opportunities for doing business with your organization.
  • What a leading Scandinavian law firm changed in their business to allow people to make a greater contribution.
  • The connection between diversity, openness to change, extraordinary customer experience, and the future of business.

Expert Bio

Sally Helgesen is an internationally acclaimed author, speaker, and consultant, and one of the world’s brand-name experts on women’s leadership.  Her most recent book, The Female Vision: Women’s Real Power at Work, explores how women’s insights can transform organizations. She is also the author of the best-selling The Female Advantage: Women’s Ways of Leadership, hailed as “the classic work” on women’s leadership style, translated into 11 languages, and continually in print for over twenty years. An earlier book, The Web of Inclusion: A New Architecture for Building Great Organizations, was cited in The Wall Street Journal as one of the best books on leadership of all time.

Sally develops and delivers leadership programs for corporations, partnership firms, universities and non-profits around the globe. Clients have included Microsoft, IBM, Johnson & Johnson, Prudential, KPMG, The World Bank, The United Way, the Council of Independent Colleges, West Point USMA, The Office of Public Management UK; The Global Forum on Women, Society and the Economy, Paris; The Center for Distributed Education, Oslo; and ING Amsterdam.

Sally has consulted with the United Nations Development Program on building more inclusive country offices and on strengthening women’s programs in Africa and Asia. She has led seminars at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and Smith College, and been visiting scholar at Northwestern University and the Lauriston Institute in Melbourne Australia. She is a contributing editor to the magazine strategy+business, and a member of the International Women’s Forum and Executive Networks. Articles about her work have been featured in Fortune, The New York Times, Fast Company, and Business Week. She contributes a weekly blog at Forbes.com.

For more information, visit Sally’s website.

Contact Info for Sally Helgesen

Web address: SallyHelgesen.com

Travels From: New York, NY

Follow Sally: Twitter

Books by Sally Helgesen

    

john bernard

66: Business at the Speed of Now – Interview with John Bernard

Bestselling Author and Chairman, Mass Ingenuity

Wilsonville, OR

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • Why corporations hire consultants and how the best consultants serve organizations.
  • The 3 Gears of NOW Management.
  • What skews the perspective for organizational leaders.
  • The critical implications of adapting to the shift from a work culture of mass production to one of mass customization.

Expert Bio

As the Founder and Chairman of the company Mass Ingenuity and principal architect of the NOW Management System, John Bernard’s passion focuses on leveraging best-practice management with social media inside an organization to engage employees, sharpen focus and accelerate execution. He has been building and reengineering organizations to enable them to aggressively grow the top and bottom line for 30 years, consulting with senior executives at all levels in high technology, health care, insurance, banking, forest products, distribution, manufacturing, and a wide range of service companies, along with many large government agencies.

John is the author of the bestselling book Business at the Speed of NOW, published in December 2011. He’s a top-rated speaker for the Conference Board and discussion leader on the Harvard Business Review blog, and his monthly newspaper column is syndicated to 41 Business Journals across the United States.

For more information, visit John’s website.

Contact Info for John Bernard

Business Phone: 503-705-6920

Web address: MassIngenuity.com

Travels From: Portland, OR

Follow John: Twitter

 

Books by John Bernard

lenora billings-harris

65: Trail Blazers – Interview with Lenora Billings-Harris

Diversity Strategist, Author, and Certified Speaking Professional

Greensboro, NC

Listen to this interview to learn:

  • How to bridge gaps created by perception
  • Reminders of being your best by being who you authentically are
  • The importance of attending to your verbal and non-verbal messages and micromessages that you send
  • Examples of reaching out to emerging markets in a way that’s not (unintentionally) condescending
  • A technique for raising your awareness of what it feels like to be a minority so you can become a better leader

Expert Bio

Lenora Billings-Harris is a diversity strategist who partners with organizations to help them make diversity a competitive advantage. She has been included as one of 100 Global Thought Leaders on Diversity and Inclusion by The Society of Human Resource Management, and was named by Diversity Woman Magazine as one of the twenty top influential diversity leaders in the US. Her award winning diversity leadership research is recognized in journals internationally. Lenora’s ability to transform multifaceted diversity and inclusion concepts into immediately applicable “how to’s” have enabled her to help Fortune 500 companies, professional associations, government agencies, and educational institutions facilitate change to attract and retain top talent, expand multicultural markets, and heighten the number of engaged employees.

Lenora is the author of The Diversity Advantage and co-author of TRAILBLAZERS: How Top Business Leaders are Accelerating Results through Inclusion and Diversity, and she is often an expert guest on TV and radio internationally. She serves on the adjunct faculty of the business schools of Averett University and the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, and leads a full service diversity consulting firm. She is a Certified Speaking Professional and has presented to audiences in over eighteen countries on six continents.

For more information, visit Lenora’s website.

Contact Info for Lenora Billings-Harris

Business Phone: 336-282-4443

Web address: www.ubuntuglobal.com

Travels From: Raleigh, NC

Follow Lenora:

Twitter

Books by Lenora Billings-Harri